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billionbucks25
October 28th, 2008, 06:08 PM
I think I almost learned perfectly fluent english by the time is was in preschool but learning Urdu or French is difficult. If I learnt Urdu(a language) first, would English still be a breeze to pick up.

I also had a friend who lived in Quebec uptil grade 7 and he spoke perfect french and english.

ErickaVolt
October 28th, 2008, 06:12 PM
English is easier to pickup because it is an international language and people in my country speak English. You can even learn just by listening.

wakachamo
October 28th, 2008, 06:14 PM
Compared to some of the other languages that I know, English is an incredibly easy language to pick up.

Shem
October 28th, 2008, 06:15 PM
My german teacher says that once you are around twelve you lose your natural ability to learn a language.

4th Gen Matt
October 28th, 2008, 06:18 PM
My german teacher says that once you are around twelve you lose your natural ability to learn a language.

I really don't believe that.

Although younger people are a lot more open minded, which is why it is a lot easier for them to learn it.

I think when you get older, you can still learn the language, but it is just harder.

suicidesal
October 28th, 2008, 06:18 PM
I'm not sure how this applies but I have been told that English is one of the hardest languages to master and as a result many anglophones are discourages from learning another language because english was so difficult

True Reign
October 28th, 2008, 07:22 PM
I would say English is easy to pick up on then the other languages, since English is the international language of trade, and most people wouldn't get around without knowing atleast a little bit of English.

>Feelings<
October 28th, 2008, 07:43 PM
English is one of the easiest language to pick up, and Japanese/Chinese are one of the hardest ones

Tamaki
October 28th, 2008, 08:12 PM
I've actually heard English is one of the hardest languages, because of all the werid rules, pronunciation/spelling and idioms.

I'm learning Spanish, and you can tell how to pronounce a word just by looking at it. Would someone who doesn't know English know how to say "measure," or "fruit?"

Volkner's Apprentice
October 28th, 2008, 08:17 PM
I've heard English, by grammar and writing, is one of the most difficult (because we have all these inane rules...but I'm one to talk, I use oxford commas religiously :P)

But I can safely say, especially when you're younger (because yes, it's true when you're little it's easier to start pronouncing/learning another language: every teacher in my school district though teaching french or spanish to elementary students would have been a good idea) it's easier to learn another language.

English also, I can tell, is easy to pick up speech-wise.

Aphrodite
October 28th, 2008, 08:37 PM
From my opinion, English is actually quite hard to grasp. With all the major grammar and wod translations, it's quite complex.

This is coming from a frenchy though.

Aurafire
October 28th, 2008, 08:47 PM
I've heard mixed things on this...Some say it's very hard to pick up, some say it's not. Of course, I'm not a very good judge...I've been speaking it all my life, so the concept of english being difficult to speak is very foreign to me.

Tyrantrum
October 28th, 2008, 08:55 PM
YES!!!

I'm taking Spanish class in high-school, so I can understand the Spanish Pokémon hacks. xD
Unfortunately, I can never remember what I've learned. ;-;

It really stinks.

Hiidoran
October 28th, 2008, 09:11 PM
As infants, deficiencies aside, we are all born with the same ability to remember and mimmick sounds we hear around us. An infant's mind is like an empty canvas that will quickly be painted with all sorts of twists and tricks of the tongue.
When we are this young, we are all able to learn any language equally. As we grow, our minds grow as well and in order to hold the massive amounts of sounds we hear often, some other not so familiar sounds are quickly forgotten. While a native English speaker remembers the sound "th" pretty darn quickly, a native Spanish speaker may have more proclivity towards "nyo".

As our minds develop and try to expand upon more knowledge, the ability to recognize and quickly process sounds that are not native to us are lost very rapidly. We remember sounds we have heard over and over and can quickly stream them together to form thoughts and words, however sounds that are foriegn to our ears force our minds to slow down and process the incoming information more slowly. Because our minds at a younger age are rapidly learning things, we inadvertently learn to ignore these sounds.

This explains why it is easier to pick up on another language while we are young versus when we are older. This also explains how one can grow up learning two different languages fluently.
(Learning to differenciate between the two languages is a skill learned later by the child, however.

Sorry, I often study linguistics and the psychology of such on the human brain. It is actually quite interesting to see just why our brains don't like to try and process strings of sounds that we don't recognize. xD

Now, I've heard English is harder to completely master as a foreign language. Mostly due to the many lingual influences that created English, the pronunciation of many words may not seem to follow any sort of universal rule or system. It may seem random to those that are not native to the language. That, mixed with our wide abundance of sharp and loose sounds as well as our sometimes crazy grammatical rules, makes English a pretty tough little cookie to crack. xD

Ayouki Emerald
October 28th, 2008, 09:20 PM
Well, it depends really. I speak four languages and English is one of them. I was taught English when I was three years old. Maybe, yes. English is easier to speak then Japanese! o_O

Zet
October 28th, 2008, 09:45 PM
well this is really a hard question to answer, it really depends if you are a fast learner or not since english is one of the hardest languages to learn due to the grammar, spelling and pretty much just everything, though I guess you could say learning english would be helpful if you visit another country

Sounds
October 28th, 2008, 09:47 PM
To me English was really much easier to learn than any other langage
(French{born langage} German and a bit Italian)

Idiot!
October 28th, 2008, 11:38 PM
Young children had their more active LADs to help them.

It truly depends. Language is caught, not taught. If you live with English speakers, you will be one.

Motsuko Live
October 29th, 2008, 02:22 AM
I'd probably say English is one of the hardest languages to learn. We have so many different words that mean the same thing. I know there must be other languages with the same issue, but we have got to be one of the worst. Think about it; how many different words can you come up with that (basically) mean the same things as 'sad'? Thank God for thesaurus', I guess. o.o;;

Franceschi
October 29th, 2008, 02:37 AM
I feel as though English is a much harder language to learn. As Ritsuki has said, there are a lot more words for the same meaning, which makes a lot of people go, "WHUT? O-O;"
We have more uses for the same word and some of the same sounding word has a different spelling. It's just freaking hard. XD;

RYOUKI
October 29th, 2008, 03:29 AM
Erm, I guess.

English is my second language, but I kinda picked it up well.

wobbadude1
October 29th, 2008, 04:22 AM
I am English and I think learning English is WAY easier than most languages as:

*We don't have masculine or feminine nouns.
*We don't have any accents on words, like circonflexes, aigus, graves, umlauts, cedillas, etc. Apart from borrowed words.
*When conjucating a verb in English it only changes in third person i.e: I have, you have, he has.

I'm sure English have aspects that are hard but compared to most languages it's easier!

Adventure
October 29th, 2008, 04:37 AM
I'm Swedish, and here we have English around us every day. We hardly ever dub English movies or tv-shows, commercials are in English or the things have English names, all our games are in English, and so on and so forth. In seventh grade, we're supposed to be able to discuss serious things in English in school, and write long stories or essays in the language.

I've never had much problem with English, but that's probably because of this; we have it all around us when we grow up, here in Sweden. Mush more so nowadays than when I was little, actually :/

AND, I've heard German is a technically easier language, because the words and idiomatic thingys are more "natural" than the English... if that made any sense ( I still can't always express myself perfectly in English xD )

Furanty
October 29th, 2008, 07:58 AM
There is a scala on which languages are on a certain level of learning, depending on some features or criteria. English is one of the easiest to learn, because of the missing genders of a word (Spanish has two (male and female) and German even has three (male, female, neutral)), then, there a nothing really like casus (Latin has 5 casus, German 4 and finnish 19).
All in one, English is easier than for example German, French, Japanese or Chinese.

Alakazam17
October 29th, 2008, 08:32 AM
From what I've heard in school, English may very well be the hardest language to learn. It is so different from other languages in many regards. For one thing, every "rule" in English has an exception(ie. "I before E except after C" works for piece, but not neighbour. XD). And this rule itself has an exception, in that "Q must always be followed by U" is the only English rule that stands 100% of the time (Iraq isn't English, folks, XD).

Another thing that I've noticed is silent sounds(ie. the words "know," "gnaw," etc), and different letters sounding the same way(ie. "F" & "PH," "EE" & "EA," "K" and hard "C").

So unless you grow up speaking it, English can be quite a challenge for some. Although those who speak the other Germanic languages(French, Italian, German, etc) should have an easier time than most.

Furanty
October 29th, 2008, 09:08 AM
From what I've heard in school, English may very well be the hardest language to learn. It is so different from other languages in many regards. For one thing, every "rule" in English has an exception(ie. "I before E except after C" works for piece, but not neighbour. XD). And this rule itself has an exception, in that "Q must always be followed by U" is the only English rule that stands 100% of the time (Iraq isn't English, folks, XD).

Another thing that I've noticed is silent sounds(ie. the words "know," "gnaw," etc), and different letters sounding the same way(ie. "F" & "PH," "EE" & "EA," "K" and hard "C").

So unless you grow up speaking it, English can be quite a challenge for some. Although those who speak the other Germanic languages(French, Italian, German, etc) should have an easier time than most.
Well, English is different, but in the way that it is easier. These letters with the same sound exist in almost all languages. Only a few don't have it (Spanish or Esperanto). You also mentioned just orthography, but grammar is more important. orthography must be learnt by everyone, also by native speaker.

Motsuko Live
October 29th, 2008, 11:33 AM
*We don't have masculine or feminine nouns.

... Waiter/Waitress, Actor/Actress, Prince/Princess, etc? o.o;

Furanty
October 29th, 2008, 11:50 AM
... Waiter/Waitress, Actor/Actress, Prince/Princess, etc? o.o;
That are not many forms. In German does any job have a female form. (Koch - Köchin, Archeologe - Archeologin, Lehrer - Lehrerin, Chef - Chefin and so on.)

Virtual Chatot
October 29th, 2008, 12:04 PM
English is supposedly one of the hardest languages to learn.
I know a bit of French which wasn't hard at all to learn because their language shares many of the same grammar rules that English does.

Right now I'm learning Hebrew independently through the Rosetta Stone program, and I'm having trouble remembering all the grammar rules.

That are not many forms. In German does any job have a female form. (Koch - Köchin, Archeologe - Archeologin, Lehrer - Lehrerin, Chef - Chefin and so on.)
French dives deeper, even using the words un and une to signify masculinity and femininity.

.inLOVE
October 29th, 2008, 12:24 PM
English is very easy to pick up because it is spoken around the world AND there are no dialects or super-fast words. When I was a child, I found it easier to speak English than Italian so spoke it around the house more often than my parents.

Zebra Thunderhead
October 29th, 2008, 03:13 PM
I'd say English is harder than most languages to learn, simply because we have so many rules and then we go and break the standard rules. For example, I know it's impossible for French people to say "squirrel." They just can't roll it off their tongues. There are so many grammatical things that don't make sense to a lot of people, even native speakers of English.

El Gofre
October 29th, 2008, 03:51 PM
This was an example used by a belgian pen pal of mine:

Spanish words for "the"- El, la, las, los, and more
English words for "the"- The

Of course being English myself I have no grasp of how much harder it would be to learn this language over another. But according to the afformentioned Belgian, English is simpler in that it has a single set of pronouns rather than hordes of prefixes and suffixes. Of the french and spanish I know, this is a valid arguament since I had extreme problems learning all of the different word endings, being as specific as ownership and whether or not the verb was premanent ect.

Wish
October 29th, 2008, 05:57 PM
I believe it is one of the hardest languages to learn due to the amount of rules and exceptions. Also, there are many words which mean the same thing. Since I grew up with the English language, I caught up pretty quickly. Although, I can imagine myself as a foreign speaker and try to learn English. I take Spanish at school, and it seems much more easier to learn by a foreign speaker rather then a foreign speaker learning English.

Glitter Stain
October 29th, 2008, 06:13 PM
English has a whole bunch of weird rules and irregularities, but...

As Gofre said, there are so many different words in other languages for "the" and other articles. Plus, there's something you've got to do in other languages called conjugating which is rarely used in English other than simply saying things like running, ran, and runs over "run". And there's irregularities in any language.

I'm not sure how to answer this, to be honest.

Loki
October 29th, 2008, 06:21 PM
Yeah, apparently people like to say that English is really difficult, but I think it's just a matter of the fact that we don't even speak our own language correctly. We have so many slang words that just jumble up the mix, putting 'like' where it doesn't belong, and then saying things like "Get on the car" instead of "Get in the car", which both generally mean the same thing to us, y'know?

But I learned English as my second language, and from the little that I can remember, it wasn't a difficult transition. The most important thing about learning any language is to be able to hear it on a regular basis, and it's not so hard if you have people who can tell you right or wrong. [/shruggg] But it becomes a problem when we're just starting to learn slang. I remember I couldn't figure out what "Fart" meant for the longest time. xD;

Actually though, I'd say it depends on which language you're transitioning from, really. Like, from French or Spanish, or a romance language, perhaps it wouldn't be as difficult...?

Vernikova
October 29th, 2008, 06:29 PM
I am English and I think learning English is WAY easier than most languages as:

*We don't have any accents on words, like circonflexes, aigus, graves, umlauts, cedillas, etc. Apart from borrowed words.

Actually, the proper way to spell coordinator is cöordinator or coördinator. I forgot, but most spell it coordinator these days. It's a rule about two "o"s seperated by a syllable. A famous magazine in New York magazine still spells it that way.

icomeanon6
October 29th, 2008, 07:08 PM
I would hate to have to learn English as a second language. Just by looking at the grammatical structures that I'm learning about in German, I can tell that English is simply much more difficult to learn when older. English has more rules than almost any other language, and the only thing it has more of than rules are exceptions. Don't get me started on number of words. The English vocabulary is basically all of the Germanic words and all of the romance words mixed together.

English is very easy to pick up because it is spoken around the world AND there are no dialects or super-fast words.
English actually has several dialects. There are significant differences between British and American English: colour vs. color, civilisation vs. civilization, etc.

That brings me to another issue: arbitrary spelling! English spelling is about as far away from being phonetic as is feasible. Did anyone here know that "fish" could at one time be spelled as "ghoti"? I'm serious: gh as in rough, o as in women, and ti as in nation. There are so many different ways to pronounce the same combinations of letters that English spelling has to be memorized more than actually learned and understood.

I'd say the only way that English is simpler than any other language is in the lack of noun genders. And, no, I'm not talking about words like "waitress." For those who don't know, in languages such as German and Spanish, nouns like "chair" and "window" have genders. Aside from that one aspect, English is definitely more complicated. It may not be as hard anymore to learn basic conversational English because of its widespread international usage, but it is definitely one of the hardest languages to learn how to write in.

Sounds
October 29th, 2008, 07:39 PM
English is supposedly one of the hardest languages to learn.
I know a bit of French which wasn't hard at all to learn because their language shares many of the same grammar rules that English does.

Right now I'm learning Hebrew independently through the Rosetta Stone program, and I'm having trouble remembering all the grammar rules.


French dives deeper, even using the words un and une to signify masculinity and femininity.

Yes French is much harder than English,although its my born language its still much harder to use than English,the Grammar is harder,there is more words,it is just much harder to learn than English,heck,french is much harder than English at my school.

icomeanon6
October 29th, 2008, 07:41 PM
Yes French is much harder than English,although its my born language its still much harder to use than English,the Grammar is harder,there is more words,it is just much harder to learn than English,heck,french is much harder than English at my school.
Wrong. English has far more words than French, it's not even close.

SnowRaven
October 29th, 2008, 08:14 PM
School growing up taught both Russian and English at the same time. In my family we would speak English in the home and Russian everywhere else, so I've lived with both languages my whole life, but I must say that I personally found Russian easier to learn. The rules of the Russian language are more set in stone, there aren't so many exceptions to the rules like there is in English.

Ayano Katagiri
October 29th, 2008, 08:29 PM
I learnt English as a second language and I do remember it being pretty difficult at times with the grammar and speaking. But since I picked it up at an early age I don't think it was as difficult as if I had tried it now instead.
Even now I find in depth analysis of English literature texts pretty difficult, especially the language techniques.

Having experienced learning other languages (I've taken French and Spanish lessons before and currently take Japanese), my opinion is that it really does depend on the person. I seem to be able to take on a new language pretty easily as long as I have the interest and desire to actually learn it.

Silverwings-Lumina
October 29th, 2008, 08:46 PM
I think Chinese is much more easier than English... I hate the rules and stuff in English, and my English... Can be terribly bad due to Grammar mistakes. Chinese however, IMO, is less complicated.
Probably because I grew up learning Chinese first, then English. I guess it all does depends on you yourself. If you're willing to learn, I'm sure you'll make it.

... Ah well.

Sounds
October 29th, 2008, 09:13 PM
Wrong. English has far more words than French, it's not even close.

do you even know how to speak french?
I know what I'm saying when i say that french is harder,it didn't take me more than 3 month to learn English

Jorah
October 30th, 2008, 02:19 PM
From what I've heard in school, English may very well be the hardest language to learn. It is so different from other languages in many regards. For one thing, every "rule" in English has an exception(ie. "I before E except after C" works for piece, but not neighbour. XD).


That's because that's not the whole of the saying, the rest is "except when the sound is "a"" (which is what Lisa said on the Simpsons XD) but then "weird" is an exception

English is very easy to pick up because it is spoken around the world AND there are no dialects or super-fast words.

There may not be dialects in America, but there are many different accents and dialects in different areas of Britian. There are literally hundreds of different accents and dialects in Britian. Not to mention confusing words that have different meanings in the UK and US, eg

UK jam = US jelly
UK jelly = US jello (?)
UK crisps = US chips
UK chips = US french fries

Edit: Wow. 1 mistake.

This explains why I always got confused as to how you could make a peanut butter and jelly sandwhich...

Words are sometimes pronounced differently, eg Americans don't pronounce the "h" in "herbs", us Brits do

And some words that just aren't used over in America, like "wellies" and "chav" (what do Americans call wellington boots?)

And there is slightly different grammer in places. But I suppose it's like that with other languages?

I know it's Wiki, but it's still interesting http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_and_British_English_differences

Actually, the proper way to spell coordinator is cöordinator or coördinator. I forgot, but most spell it coordinator these days. It's a rule about two "o"s seperated by a syllable. A famous magazine in New York magazine still spells it that way.

In British English we sometimes write it co-ordinator, (although I've seen it coodinator here, it just looks odd to have 2 o's that aren't an "oo" sound) we usually use more dashes than America, I think

Vernikova
October 30th, 2008, 05:13 PM
do you even know how to speak french?
I know what I'm saying when i say that french is harder,it didn't take me more than 3 month to learn English

He said that English has more words than French, which is a fact. He never said anything about which is harder.

Fun fact: Qwerty is the only word in English that doesn't follow the "QU" rule.

Trap-Eds
October 30th, 2008, 07:38 PM
I know it's Wiki, but it's still interesting http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_and_British_English_differences


Dang. I knew Americans and Britsh said things different, but...sheesh. :cool:
And I think we would call "wellington boots" rubber boots or something...


Fun fact: Qwerty is the only word in English that doesn't follow the "QU" rule.

Hey yeah, but I don't think "qwerty" is really a word.

I before e except after c, or when sounded like a as in neighbor and weigh. How come nobody ever remembers that part?

I wouldn't say the english languge is the toughest to learn, just one of the toughest.
"The dove dove through the window." If you didn't know the two ways to say dove, that wouldn't make much sense, now would it?

Can aynbdoy raed tihs snetnece? If you can, it's bceasue Egnilsh-sepainkg poelpes raed the wrod as a wolhe. Or smoetinhg lkie taht. ;)

Barney.
October 31st, 2008, 01:28 PM
It is supposedly one of the harder languages to learn due to some the silly Grammar and different sounding letters in certain words, E.G:

Take this made up word:
Ghoti
This word could be pronounced: "Fish"
Ok so:
The:F
Gh makes an "f" sound in words such as: Enough, Rough, Tough.

The:I
An "o" sound becomes an "i" sound when we pronounce the word: Women

The:SH
Ti becomes a "Sh" sound in words such as: Station

:D

----------------
Listening to: Hot Chip - Wearing My Rolex (BBC Live Lounge) (http://www.foxytunes.com/artist/hot+chip/track/wearing+my+rolex+(bbc+live+lounge)) via FoxyTunes (http://www.foxytunes.com/signatunes/)

Jorah
October 31st, 2008, 01:37 PM
Hey yeah, but I don't think "qwerty" is really a word.


Well, "qwerty" is a name (English keyboards are qwerty keyboards) so I suppose it doesn't count

Vernikova
October 31st, 2008, 03:53 PM
Well, "qwerty" is a name (English keyboards are qwerty keyboards) so I suppose it doesn't count

Of course it counts. Even in your example, you used qwerty as an adjective. :P

Naturalistick
October 31st, 2008, 04:14 PM
I can't accurately state if it's hard or not, imo it depends on perspective.
Countries which their languages have similar etymological origins learn each others' language faster, and the reverse for the opposite situation.

Personally I can defend English is one of the easiest languages to pick up. To start with, the conjugation of verb tenses is much easier (at least, compared to my language).
Although I've naturally grew amongst it, and the habit makes learning much smoother.

/Circa
October 31st, 2008, 04:58 PM
The reason I hate English is because you have to know it where I live, and it takes away my foreign accent and I cant pronounce words I could before.

It's only easy to learn because you hear and see it everywhere.

Azzurra
October 31st, 2008, 05:30 PM
English is actually quite a hard language to learn, if it's not your first language.
However, if you actually were born into an English speaking world, it would be very easy to pick up on.

Glitter Stain
October 31st, 2008, 06:42 PM
I think Traditional British English is much harder to learn than American English. There's slang in both, but Traditional English has even more odd rules than American English

And don't try to say "dood english has a bunch of rools" trying to prove it the most difficult language to learn -- I've had to remember a lot more rules for Spanish class. And there's words that mean the same thing in any language. ^_~

UK jam = US jelly
UK jelly = US jello (?)
UK crisps = US chips
UK chips = US crisps
What? This post is just ignorant. I'm assuming you're from the UK because most of that is wrong. First of all, we have both jam and jelly. They are two different things. Second of all, Jell-O is a brand name. What you're thinking of is gelatin. Finally, we don't call anything crisps. If you ask for crisps in the McDonald's drive-through, they'd put you through to the mental institution. Those are called french fries, my friend.

wobbadude1
November 10th, 2008, 02:37 PM
I still say English is easy as it is the only language without the subjunctive and there aren't numerous ways to say a particular verb I have/he would have/they might have, etc.

Working Class Hero
November 10th, 2008, 02:44 PM
Oh how untrue. If it were:

1. Rosetta Stone would no exist.
2. Language classes would not be in High School.
3. No one would be bilangual or mulilangual because when you are 12 technically you are still learning English.

So yeah.

I have friends in many countries. Japan, China, Saudi Arabia (Omg, I am like the only non-biast American! [not really but... lol you fail @ people who hate muslims), France, Mexico, South Africa ect. And they all agree that English is REALLY easy. Mainly because most of it's grammar is easy. It isn't like...Spanish where "Vivar" is written as...

Vivar, Vivo, Vivas, Viva, Vivamos, Viváis, Vivan, Vivó, Vivaste, and like 40 more things. o.o

Soul Eater
November 10th, 2008, 02:52 PM
I think all the languages are equal because we always say that Japanese is hard right? But if you think about it, the Japanese will tell you our language is just as hard. It's the same for every language.

Though, I think English is harder to pick up because we have more complicated words and our vocabulary is insanely large...something like that.

Jorah
November 10th, 2008, 02:56 PM
What? This post is just ignorant. I'm assuming you're from the UK because most of that is wrong. First of all, we have both jam and jelly. They are two different things. Second of all, Jell-O is a brand name. What you're thinking of is gelatin. Finally, we don't call anything crisps. If you ask for crisps in the McDonald's drive-through, they'd put you through to the mental institution. Those are called french fries, my friend.

Wow. No need to be so rude. I got one of them wrong because I accidently copy and pasted the wrong thing because I was pasting about 3 things around. I know UK chips = US french fries and I know you call nothing crisps. It easy enough to see that I pasted the word in the wrong place because it was 11pm. I never said US jam and jelly are the same thing, at least read it before you go into a rant about how I'm so ignorant, seriously. Jell-O is why I put the question mark there, I've just heard it on American programmes.

And I don't go to McDonald's, blah.

Trap-Eds
November 10th, 2008, 03:20 PM
Spanish where "Vivar" is written as...

Vivar, Vivo, Vivas, Viva, Vivamos, Viváis, Vivan, Vivó, Vivaste, and like 40 more things. o.o

To live, I live, You live, She live, <:laugh: We live, We live, [Spain,] They live, live in past tense and where oneself lives....I think.
And I think it's live as in: "I live here," not as in "She's on live TV!!"

Surf
November 11th, 2008, 02:09 AM
I don't think it is easy
It has so many rules to learn
I picked up french fast and it's easier than english class LOl

Sora_8920
November 11th, 2008, 03:01 AM
Well, since I've lived in the US all my life, yeah, it's very easy.

It's a bit different if English is your second language, though.

Archer
November 11th, 2008, 03:14 AM
I think Traditional British English is much harder to learn than American English. There's slang in both, but Traditional English has even more odd rules than American English
Ok, there are a few spelling differences which were changed when the US tried to make a point of being different. In many cases, the US spelling is more phonetic, although the "UK" (pretty much everyone else uses it...xD) English has evolved over time, retaining spellings from extinct pronunciations. I personally prefer the UK spelling, as it just looks fancier in most cases. EG: "Programme" as opposed to "Program"

And don't try to say "dood english has a bunch of rools" trying to prove it the most difficult language to learn -- I've had to remember a lot more rules for Spanish class. And there's words that mean the same thing in any language. ^_~
There are rules that may seem wierd in any language, they just vary. English has some strange rules, as does French. You have to remember, the majority of active languages have evolved, retaining strange rules and inexplicable wordings.

What? This post is just ignorant. I'm assuming you're from the UK because most of that is wrong. First of all, we have both jam and jelly. They are two different things. Second of all, Jell-O is a brand name. What you're thinking of is gelatin. Finally, we don't call anything crisps. If you ask for crisps in the McDonald's drive-through, they'd put you through to the mental institution. Those are called french fries, my friend.

Ok, in Australia:
Jam - A fruit-based spread that usually goes on bread.
Jelly - A flavoured, sugary, wobbly thing.
Chips - Usually describes the dry packaged flakes in bags.
Hot Chips - Deep fried chips, hot and usually in a cup/tray. Good with Tomato Sauce (Ketchup)

As you can see, everyone has variations. Australia has a footwear that carries the same name as a undergarment in other countries.

I think every language has points that make it easier and harder, it would really depend on your persistance with it.

Ravecat
November 11th, 2008, 04:08 AM
What? This post is just ignorant. I'm assuming you're from the UK because most of that is wrong. First of all, we have both jam and jelly. They are two different things. Second of all, Jell-O is a brand name. What you're thinking of is gelatin. Finally, we don't call anything crisps. If you ask for crisps in the McDonald's drive-through, they'd put you through to the mental institution. Those are called french fries, my friend.

Well, that's practically the way it compares to Australian English, so he's certainly not all wrong.

Weatherman, Kiyoshi
November 11th, 2008, 08:13 AM
English is easy. Only to some, though.
Like, lets say a mexican, who has been speaking Spanish all his life,
Immigranted to America, and has to learn English to find a job.

Since English breaks it's rules of speech (I before E except after C: is one) all the times, spelling would become a big issue as well.
It's not hard to learn a language, It's just that would can't memorize 50 words per day.
>>"

FairyGarland
November 11th, 2008, 11:13 AM
English is easier to pick up because it's everywhere and borrows so many foreign words and phrases.
Though with the right motivation anyone could learn any language.
I do Chinese at school (no background) and I've noticed that people who speak English are rather reluctant to accept foreign languages. It's rather saddening. People who don't speak English make an effort to learn English but people who speak English are too lazy to learn other languages. That's how I see it.

シーツー
November 11th, 2008, 12:08 PM
It depends on where you live.
For example your native language is a Germanic one, then it's a lot easier to learn English cause there are many words that are almost the same. But if you live somewhere in Asia like China or Japan I would say that it's hard to learn English even if English is everywhere.

The advantage of English is that there aren't any articles than "the" and "a". For example in German you have "der, die and das" instead of a simple the.

Well, though English is my favorite language I gotta say that I'm kinda happy that it isn't my native language. That way I can speak two languages fluently. I guess it's difficult to learn foreign languages if you're native speaker of English. But that's anyone's guess.

Plant360
November 11th, 2008, 03:57 PM
A German foreign exchange student came to our school, and he was able to speak English pretty fluently within about the first one or two months, and other languages seem much harder to learn.

Michii
November 11th, 2008, 05:11 PM
The advantage of English is that there aren't any articles than "the" and "a". For example in German you have "der, die and das" instead of a simple the.

Der, die, das, den, dem, dein, deinen, deine, ein, einen, eine, ein again, ughhh German was soo difficult when we took it in middle school. Although it was only for a couple months and the actual learning experience of the language was what feels like hundreds of years ago, I still see it as uber hard xD. Though, I'm speaking as a natural born english speaker, so I can't talk.

I believe most people pick english so fast relative to other languages is because of its link to many other languages. If you think about it, many of our words stem from latin, french, and many common languages. It's related to so many other languages that it's just easier to pick up. Also, we don't have the umlouts from German or weird curve things under the letters in French (never payed attention in that class) or other addons that different languages have. Personally, I think it's much easier to take things away in a language than add them. :/

Gumball Watterson
November 11th, 2008, 07:30 PM
It was very easy for me, I learned it when I was about 5 very fluently and my Mothertoungue was Spanish. I take advanced English classes so that explain my superior english ability. And its not like english wil be easi to forgette, as I lern mor Italian,
ai epicly pun at teh at of englicsh, ok? Aim beter than u nau! JAJAJAJA!

Oye, que paso? Se me olvido el Ingles! :(

Caelus
November 11th, 2008, 07:38 PM
I know several people (Counting me) that came to america with a lack of any english yet, when a month or so passes by, they can undertand it. So yeah, I do consider English to be more easier to pick up than most foreign languages.

pokéfandan
November 11th, 2008, 08:16 PM
For children who go through an english based class like in the united states; you will have no problem with english but if it's your second or third language it's very very hard to pick up. But English is my first language and Korean is my second :)

Dusclord
November 12th, 2008, 05:18 AM
Wokay... English is THE EASIEST WRITTEN LANGUAGE I'VE EVER LEARNT \o/ : no gender and number agreements with the adjectives, no verb classes, only a few preterit and present perfect exceptions, etc.

But right, it only depends on your mother tongue. If you need to learn the alphabet with it's... lol

Btw the problems are the pronounciation and the oral comprehension (ok native french speaker all have problems with that/I suck ok) 'cause the colloquial english is not a very clearly spoken english ;_;

Smarties-chan
November 12th, 2008, 06:32 AM
It varies from language to language, really. I just naturally learned English by watching American cartoons so I can't really say how hard it is to learn by actually studying. All I know is that I'm better at English than Swedish despite having learned it a few years later. I've seen a lot of people struggling with all the grammar and pronunciation, not to mention the spelling so I wouldn't really say English is all that easy. From about a year of studying German, I'd say it seems to be a lot easier to pick up than English. Sure there's der, die, das, objective forms and all that to keep track of, but it doesn't really seem much worse than English. I'd hate to have to learn all the rules of the English language in any other way than simply observing and listening.

Still, anyone saying English or French or whatever is hard should try learning Finnish. We have ridiculously many needlessly complicated rules and suffixes and there's just so incredibly much to keep track of. I've spoken Finnish all my life and I've always been good at it and there are still times when I really don't know what's correct and what isn't. Finnish is a very flexible language, but also a very complicated one. Don't we all love words such as:

Kahdennentuhannennen viidennensadannen kuudennenkymmenennenkahdeksannen. (the 2568th's)

I'm not even sure if I spaced that correctly. <.<

♣Gawain♣
November 12th, 2008, 11:08 PM
English is the universal language, and it's the most easiest to learn. I bet you can be fluent in that in 5 weeks than in Japanese.