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Dakota
November 29th, 2008, 03:07 PM
18 Amendment: Banned all alcohol selling, drinking, etc in the US

Then, they stopped it!

Do you think it should be put back into place?

I do. Drunk Driving is the cause of so many deaths nowadays....

Virtual Chatot
November 29th, 2008, 03:11 PM
I see many pro's, and absolutely no con's to reinstituting the 18th amendment. Alcohol is poison, that effects more than just the person drinking. My father died due to drunk driving, and while he was alive he would come home drunk and always screamed and yelled at me and my mother, calling us names.

Drunkenness is a disease

Signomi
November 29th, 2008, 03:13 PM
A topic like this would welcome further discussion, therefore this thread would better belong in Other Chat.

~Moved

Yuoaman
November 29th, 2008, 04:26 PM
Well my father was an alcoholic for a time, though he changed after my sisters were born and my Mom moved out for a while. I believe that it is up to a person to decide how they live their life, and it is wrong for a government to try to control a population, for if given a choice most people will choose to do the sensible thing.

Patchisou Yutohru
November 29th, 2008, 04:37 PM
I agree with this:

Well my father was an alcoholic for a time, though he changed after my sisters were born and my Mom moved out for a while. I believe that it is up to a person to decide how they live their life, and it is wrong for a government to try to control a population, for if given a choice most people will choose to do the sensible thing.

Along with that, if someone's idiotic enough to get them self completely wasted, losing all sense, it shouldn't be up to everyone else to pay the price even though it comes down to that at times. Though I'm against alcohol consumption, I think it's wrong to completely take away the consumption of alcohol for all of a population due to idiots who don't know how to control themselves against drinking. Yes, I'm aware that over time they become in need of alcohol if they start to drink it accessibly, but regardless, they shouldn't have done that at all. With that said, I really don't feel the need to explain myself any longer.

ErickaVolt
November 29th, 2008, 04:38 PM
I think it should. I mean many died because of alcohol drinking and more people are having cancer because of it. Also smoking should be included.

Azonic
November 29th, 2008, 04:50 PM
Alchohol and smoking are definitely not as severe as the banned drugs in the US. Sure, they are the cause of many deaths and accidents but they're still not that severe. Red wine, when taken at a moderation, actually improves the health by enhancing blood circulation and the like. Smoking only really causes long term health disorders, unlike the banned drugs which cause quite severe disorders in a short amount of time. However, I've heard that each cigarette someone smokes can take up to 20 minutes off a person's life.

Meh, the consumers of alchohol and tobacco need to be aware of the consequences that they have to offer. They should be responsible enough to do it on their own, instead of having the government trying to control the whole population. Alchohol and tobacco are also extremely popular, which reduces the chances of it getting banned in the US by far. Many people would lose their jobs, not to mention that the government in the US gets a large amount of money from tobacco sales because the tax rate for tobacco is so high.

Alchohol and tobacco are not severe enough to be banished from the US. Don't get me wrong, I'm actually against smoking and drinking and would never do it in my life. Only one country in the world has actually banned smoking, and they're a pretty small little settlement.

Cherrim
November 29th, 2008, 05:09 PM
I don't think so. :[ Mind you, I might be a bit biased because I'm currently employed by a brewery and my dad's been working in the beer industry almost all my life. So... I certainly can't say it's entirely a bad thing.

For the few people who abuse it, there are far more people who drink responsibly. To completely remove their ability to indulge a little seems crazy to me. I don't think it's good to completely ban anything. Instead, why not just enforce more of the temperance movement instead of this? Start teaching teens in school about the effects of alcohol and "train" them to know to drink in moderation, etc. Education goes a long way.

Not to mention--and my history recollection may not be the greatest here--I remember that amendment only fueled people to get their hands on alcohol through illegal means. Plus it only brought great unrest to the people and I don't think it would go over any better today. (Then again, it was never illegal in Canada back then and the business boomed, so who knows--maybe our beer industry would benefit. ;p)

Yamikarasu
November 29th, 2008, 08:56 PM
Drinking, imo, is something that if you can avoid, you should, but I don't think that it should be made illegal. They repealed the 18th Amendment for a reason.

Basically what happened was that a black market popped up that sold the illegal alcoholic drinks. Does anyone recall Al Capone? Plus with an all out ban on alchohol, that meant the current alcoholics needed to get there fix. The drinks they brewed had a much higher alchohol content then normal beer, wine, etc. That meant people got more drunk, and more people died.

What I think should be done is to do for alcohol what they did for smoking. Not make it illegal, just make it a taboo.

On a somewhat unrelated note, the alcohol prohibition is similar to what we have today with marijuana. Addicts need to get it, so they get it illegally. If there was a way to get it legally, there would be far less abuse of the drug. Of course that does not mean I support marijuana or anything, its just, you know, it should avoided if at all possible.

Phixum
November 29th, 2008, 09:06 PM
I think alcohol should be completely banned. What is its use? Alcohol is only there for economical reasons, just like smoking. Furthermore, while you might think it's your own freedom to drink whatever you want, you have to take into account how your behavior might impact your surroundings. Drunken driving is one example. It's one of the main reasons why people die on the roads. Don't give me the "these are idiots" thing; you obviously don't think straight when you're drunk anyways, Einstein.

Drunken driving is only one example. Others might be family abuse, violence in the streets, and individual health disadvantages. I won't go into these in details because I simply can't bother.

RaikaCastillo
November 29th, 2008, 09:17 PM
Yeah, like putting the 18th Amendment will stop drunk driving...or drinking for that matter.

http://www.old-picture.com/prohibition-index-001.htm

Not only was the 18th Amendment the most daft legislation in American History but it didn't do anything except give us organized crime (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Al_Capone).

Alakazam17
November 29th, 2008, 09:25 PM
It was unbanned before mostly because the problem couldn't be dealt with, unfortunately. Which is a fate I'm afraid to say may also come to marijuana-heh, in Canada you are allowed to have five grams of marijuana on you, I believe. And speaking of Canada, if alcohol was banned in the U.S. you know where everyone would be headed, right? No thanks. XD

As for drunk driving, I doubt it'd stop anything. Is a murderer going to worry about having an unlicensed gun? I don't think so. Similarly, many people arrested for drunk driving would have possession of alcohol as one of the last things on their mind.

So while I think it should be banned, I seriously doubt that it will.

Vernikova
November 29th, 2008, 09:30 PM
I actually wouldn't ban it again. I mean, you'd have to ban all alcoholic drinks if you were to do it and that just seems off-setting at events such as weddings of anything that would usually have alcohol. I know not everything has to be with alcohol but I believe that with the technology we have today that we could stop more of these things happening. I know that there are still people being killed because people sometimes drink and drive but it seems to occur less often these days. Or maybe it's just that it's being reported less.

Also, I don't think it would matter if alcohol were to be banned again anyway because sure enough there are going to be people that will make it illegally. Just like illegal drugs are today.

Then again, I can't drink yet so what do I know?

icomeanon6
November 29th, 2008, 09:49 PM
Let me get this straight: the economy is in peril, people are stressed, and you want to ban drinking? The only thing that will lead to is criminal activity, because if prohibition showed us anything, it is that Americans will use any way they can to acquire and drink alcohol. The 18th amendment was repealed for a reason, it didn't do us any good whatsoever.

Randall Raichu
November 29th, 2008, 10:04 PM
No, main reason. It wouldn't matter if it was illegal. Example: Marijuana. People will drink no matter what. People will do meth no matter what. Just because some idiots drive drunk, doesn't mean you have to ban it.

Tyrantrum
November 29th, 2008, 11:50 PM
I solemnly agree to this!
*places right hand on heart and raises left hand*

Went
November 30th, 2008, 01:22 AM
I think that banning drinking would be really bad. Not only moderately drinking is actually GOOD for your health, banning alcohol would only cause Al Capone 2 to appear. I can already see people importing beverages from abroad via mail, or disguising them as something else :|

And, for the "A lot of people have died for not using it with responsability", then you could ban guns too. They also kill people who don't use them properly, don't they?

Smoking is way worse IMO, it's much more addictive and it has no benefits at all. If we were to ban any legal drug, this would be the one to.

Elite Overlord LeSabre™
November 30th, 2008, 02:02 AM
I don't drink even though I'm of age, but IMO recreational drinking in moderation shouldn't be outlawed. My parents drink in moderation. Not once have they consumed alcohol to the extent where they acted tipsy or looked plastered. We have DWI and public intoxication laws to deal with those who drink so much that it affects their judgment.

If Prohibition taught us anything, it's that passing federal laws to ban drinking won't stop the drinking. It'll only breed more crime and force people to become more creative in how they obtain their brew. If there is a will to get liquor, folks will find a way to obtain it.

Horizon
November 30th, 2008, 05:43 AM
It's true; some of you need to broaden your minds a little and see the bigger picture. I've seen the opinions of many that one drink is enough to get you drunk and/or addictied. As has been highlighted, banning alcohol will only encourage people to do it more. If anything should be banned, then it's tobacco.

Glitter Stain
November 30th, 2008, 06:12 AM
It's true; some of you need to broaden your minds a little and see the bigger picture. I've seen the opinions of many that one drink is enough to get you drunk and/or addictied. As has been highlighted, banning alcohol will only encourage people to do it more. If anything should be banned, then it's tobacco.
Tobacco and alcohol aren't even similar. Yeah, you could get addicted from one drink, but why do you think people make such a huge deal about quitting smoking and not alcohol? It's because tobacco is a lot harder to break away from and a lot easier to get addicted to.

Yeah, I'll admit, it'd be great to get rid of tobacco forever, but there are still many people that are addicted to it and can't find a method of quitting that works for them.

As for banning alcohol, I think the 18th amendment should be reinstated. No one's going to start a war over beer. Plus, most people who go and get drunk to the point of crawling don't have the common sense left not to do something dangerous that could get themselves or someone else killed.

Protests? So what? We've had plenty of those before. A ban on alcohol doesn't take away any fundamental rights.

Aoi Natsu
November 30th, 2008, 12:02 PM
I agree that alcohol shouldn't be banned. My brother got some chick pregnant when he was drunk and has had a DUI that caused him to almost lose his job, but even watching him ruin his life like this hasn't made me totally hate alcohol. My parents still manage to drink in moderation without ruining their lives over it, and because of him I've certainly learned to steer away from alcohol. But I don't think that we need to ban alcohol because of people like him. I won't rehash the black market argument since it has already been made.

I'll play dumb for a moment. If drunk driving is your main reason for getting rid of alcohol, wouldn't getting rid of cars in general also be a supposedly logical argument? That would eliminate wrecks in general and America would have to walk/bike places, which would help with health concerns of today as well.

ranger of almia
November 30th, 2008, 01:04 PM
If we did re instate the 18th amendment people would really want alcohol more and its just like any other substance/item its not the substance but rather the person doing the substance/using an item if we have learned anything about history it is that no matter what you ban the people will always have it.

Gumball Watterson
November 30th, 2008, 02:40 PM
Yes, the fugly poison of the deep fires and flames of hell should be banned. >:|

Yes, there is the job issue but there are usually more deaths in mass accidents in one year than a few years of poverty. Mexico's drinking age is 18, more accidents, more deaths, and they are still hanging on. So why the heck can't Gringoland The United States do it?

Seriously, cigars and drinks are one of the top reasons of death that CAN be stopped, unlike Cancer and Diabetes, which either can't, or are freaking difficult and expensive.

And if they don't stop it, at LEAST put insane taxes on cigarettes and drinks so the drunk ones actually do some good for the world.

Otter Mii-kun
November 30th, 2008, 03:49 PM
18th Amendment Prohibition was repealed because it failed miserably. All it did was lead to increased crime, "bootlegging", and increased smuggling, among other things.

Same thing goes today for the "War on Drugs"-even though there is no constitutional amendment regarding Drug Prohibition-and it's proven to be even worse than Alcohol Prohibition. (Every other government-waged "war on something" has failed as well, doesn't matter if it's the War on Guns, War on Poverty, War on Illiteracy, War on Obesity, etc. [including the War on Recession (http://mises.org/story/2925)])

processr
November 30th, 2008, 04:13 PM
Yamikarasu summed it up pretty well. A ban on alcohol would be a fairly disastrous decision, all things considered. I'll address the Eighteenth Amendment itself first. It prohibited "the manufacture, sale, or transportation of intoxicating liquors". This meant that the consumption of alcohol itself was not criminalised. So, if such a ban were imposed once again, people would no doubt begin to stockpile alcohol in their homes. Then, once the ban is imposed, they'd still be acting perfectly legally. It's much like the law on smoking in the UK - it's illegal for under 18s to buy cigarettes, but legal for them to smoke cigarettes should they simply 'come across them'.

Then, of course, there's the effect such a ban would have on the economy. The beer brewing industry alone is worth $294.5 billion worldwide. Nearly $300 billion. And this figure doesn't take into account the wine growing or spirit distillation industries. Plus, there would be huge job losses and repercussions throughout not only the alcohol production industries, but also those that rely on them. The pub/bar trade would almost certainly die out, restaurants would take a huge hit and those firms that transport alcohol would lose huge contracts. And, of course, there's the factor of alcohol's addictiveness. People will resort to illegal measures to obtain alcohol, or illegally sell the alcohol that they themselves have stockpiled. Eventually, alcohol will be smuggled into the country, and organised crime will be rife. Prohibition proved unpopular in the 1930s, and it would be even more disastrous in the 21st century.

Red1530
November 30th, 2008, 08:02 PM
The re-institution of the Eighteenth Amendment would be a very bad idea. It single handily caused the rise of organized crime in the United States when it was originally passed. If it was bought back it will increase the strength of street gangs in the United States.

Euphoric Magikarp
November 30th, 2008, 08:28 PM
Man you guys are killing my buzz.

But seriously it wouldn't stop alcohol, you ban it again, then the bootleggers and speak easies will just come back.

Soul Eater
December 3rd, 2008, 07:42 AM
I doubt it. To be honest, I think people would just complain about not having it at all and you also have to realize that even with the law, people are still going to break it. Cops can't be out there to catch every person who swerves about on the interstate. Everything else, especially the law saying that you can't text or talk on your cellphone while driving, people STILL do it.

It's always a win or lose situation, people do things intentionally, regardless of what others tell them and its not until they cause great damage to another person, that they realize just how much of a danger that is.

Phixum
December 3rd, 2008, 09:27 AM
The re-institution of the Eighteenth Amendment would be a very bad idea. It single handily caused the rise of organized crime in the United States when it was originally passed. If it was bought back it will increase the strength of street gangs in the United States.

Would you mind to elaborate on your mind? I cannot see any subtle correlation between prohibiting alcoholic beverages and gangs activity on the streets. If there is any correlation, I'm sure alcohol would linearly increase the criminal activities since it affects your mental capacity and your sense of responsibility.

I think that banning drinking would be really bad. Not only moderately drinking is actually GOOD for your health...

Get your facts straight. While alcohol (even moderately, as you say) can thin your blood and be beneficial to your heart, it kills most of your body. If you talk about 'health', think about the effect on all organs as well as its effect on heart and blood. Unfortunately, I cannot seem to find any publication on google to support my claim. Even if I did, I think we may realize that google is not a reliable tool for such arguments. A reliable source would be a person, a researcher, who had actually dealt with alcohol in the lab himself. My Organic Chemistry professors and the Associate Dean of the Faculty of Medicine in Calgary (where I live) have delivered these information to me. Alas, I cannot show you a conversation or a video where they had actually told me so.

Red1530
December 7th, 2008, 01:59 PM
Where you asleep when your history class studied 1920's? Al Capone rose to fame by trafficking in alcohol. There is a bill in the House of Representatives that celebrates the end of Prohibition that states crime went up
Celebrating 75 years of effective State-based alcohol regulation and recognizing State lawmakers, regulators, law enforcement officers, the public health community and industry members for creating a workable, legal, and successful system of alcoholic beverage regulation, distribution, and sale.

IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

Mr. STUPAK (for himself and Mr. COBLE) submitted the following concurrent resolution; which was referred to the Committee on the Judiciary

CONCURRENT RESOLUTION

Celebrating 75 years of effective State-based alcohol regulation and recognizing State lawmakers, regulators, law enforcement officers, the public health community and industry members for creating a workable, legal, and successful system of alcoholic beverage regulation, distribution, and sale.

Whereas throughout American history, alcohol has been consumed by its citizens and regulated by the Government;

Whereas prior to the 18th Amendment to the Constitution, which established Prohibition in the United States, abuses and insufficient regulation resulted in irresponsible overconsumption of alcohol;

Whereas passage of the 18th Amendment, which prohibited `the manufacture, sale, or transportation of intoxicating liquors' in the United States, resulted in a dramatic increase in illegal activity, including unsafe black market alcohol production, organized crime, and noncompliance with alcohol laws;

Whereas the platforms of the 2 major political parties in the 1932 presidential campaigns advocated ending national Prohibition by repealing the 18th Amendment;

Whereas on February 20, 1933, the 2nd Session of the 72nd Congress submitted to conventions of the States the question of repealing the 18th Amendment and adding new language to the Constitution that the transportation or importation of alcoholic beverages for delivery or use in any State would have to be carried out in compliance with the laws of the State;

Whereas on December 3, 1933, Utah became the 36th State to approve what became the 21st Amendment to the Constitution, the quickest-ratified amendment and the only ever decided by State conventions, pursuant to article V of the Constitution;

Whereas alcohol is the only product in commerce that has been the subject of 2 constitutional amendments;

Whereas Congress's reenactment of the Webb-Kenyon Act, passage of the Federal Alcohol Administration Act, the 21st Amendment Enforcement Act, annual appropriations to support State enforcement of underage drinking laws, and the STOP Underage Drinking Act demonstrated the longstanding and continuing intent of Congress that States exercise their primary authority to achieve temperance, the creation and maintenance of orderly and stable markets, and the facilitation of the efficient collection of taxes;

Whereas legislatures and alcoholic beverage control agencies in the 50 States have worked diligently to implement the powers granted by the 21st Amendment for 75 years;

Whereas legislatures and alcoholic beverage control agencies in all States created and maintain State-based regulatory systems for alcohol distribution made up of producers and importers, wholesale distributors, and retailers;

Whereas development of a transparent and accountable system of distribution and sales, an orderly market, temperance in consumption and safe practices, the efficient collection of taxes, and other essential policies have been successfully guided by the collective experience and cooperation of government agencies and licensed industry members throughout our geographically and culturally diverse Nation;

Whereas regulated commerce in alcoholic beverages contributes billions of dollars in Federal and State tax revenues and additional billions to the economy annually;

Whereas 2,500 breweries, distilleries, wineries, and import companies, 2,700 wholesale distributor facilities, over 530,000 retail outlets, and numerous agricultural, packaging, and transportation businesses support the employment of millions of Americans;

Whereas the American system of State-based alcohol regulation has resulted in a marketplace with unprecedented choice, variety, and selection for consumers;

Whereas members of the licensed alcoholic beverage industry have been constant partners with Federal and State Governments in balancing the conduct of competitive businesses with the need to control alcohol in order to provide American consumers with a safe and regulated supply of alcoholic beverages; and

Whereas members of the licensed alcoholic beverage industry have created and supported a wide range of national, State, and community programs to address problems associated with alcohol abuse, including drunk driving and underage drinking: Now, therefore, be it

Resolved by the House of Representatives (the Senate concurring), That Congress--


(1) celebrates 75 years of effective State-based alcohol regulation since the passage of the 21st Amendment;


(2) recognizes State lawmakers, regulators, law enforcement officers, the public health community and industry members for creating a workable, legal, and successful system of alcoholic beverage regulation, distribution, and sale; and


(3) continues to support policies that allow States to effectively regulate alcohol.

txteclipse
December 7th, 2008, 02:47 PM
I think you should have to buy alcohol using a special kind of I.D., which keeps a record of how many drinks you've had versus how much time has gone by. In other words, you wouldn't be able to buy any more alcohol if drinking it would put you over the legal limit of intoxication.

Fate Falls
December 7th, 2008, 02:59 PM
I'm drinking wine right now. I think that itself states my opinion.

We already have laws against drunk driving, obviously. If you want to be stupid and risk it, then you'll likely pay. If we had a law banning all forms of alcohol, people would still drink it, just as people still do illegal drugs.

Stalin Malone
December 9th, 2008, 02:54 PM
Prohibition was an abomination. I'll pass on that proposal.

Master Electrician
December 9th, 2008, 06:23 PM
For everyone who drinks to excess, there's ten more who know how to moderate themselves. Alcohol, like any other substance can be addictive and dangerous. It can also be enjoyable when moderated. I honestly don't like being drunk, but I rather enjoy a good beer every now and again, especially around the gaming table.

Personal opinions aside, it would lead to an economic devastation which is one of the last things we need at the moment, crime, both organized and un- would skyrocket, most likely breaking an already stretched Corrections system, and the American populace would certainly engage in massive protests at best, mass riots at the worst.

Merzbau
December 9th, 2008, 08:17 PM
Prohibition creates a black market and a lot of angry drunks that will do anything to get alcohol and/or the money to obtain it.

Bad idea.

Keep freedom of choice, and freedom of stupidity, the USA can't work without them.

mystletainn
December 9th, 2008, 08:37 PM
Would you mind to elaborate on your mind? I cannot see any subtle correlation between prohibiting alcoholic beverages and gangs activity on the streets. If there is any correlation, I'm sure alcohol would linearly increase the criminal activities since it affects your mental capacity and your sense of responsibility.



Get your facts straight. While alcohol (even moderately, as you say) can thin your blood and be beneficial to your heart, it kills most of your body. If you talk about 'health', think about the effect on all organs as well as its effect on heart and blood. Unfortunately, I cannot seem to find any publication on google to support my claim. Even if I did, I think we may realize that google is not a reliable tool for such arguments. A reliable source would be a person, a researcher, who had actually dealt with alcohol in the lab himself. My Organic Chemistry professors and the Associate Dean of the Faculty of Medicine in Calgary (where I live) have delivered these information to me. Alas, I cannot show you a conversation or a video where they had actually told me so.

The most infamous gangs of the 1920's gained their power and prominence by participating and running the alcohol smuggling rings. They eventually branched off into other lovely fields such as murder. Here, since you require facts:

Alphonse Gabriel "Al" Capone (January 17, 1899 – January 25, 1947), commonly nicknamed Scarface, was an Italian-American gangster who led a crime syndicate dedicated to smuggling and bootlegging of liquor and other illegal activities during the Prohibition Era of the 1920s and 1930s.

---

Mafia activities were restricted until 1920, when they exploded because of the introduction of the prohibition. Al Capone's Syndicate in the 1920s ruled Chicago.

By the end of the 1920s, two factions of organized crime had emerged, causing the Castellamarese war for control of organized crime in New York City. With the murder of Joseph Masseria, the leader of one of the factions, the war ended uniting the two sides back into one organization now dubbed Cosa Nostra. Salvatore Maranzano, the first leader of American Mafia, was himself murdered within six months and Charles "Lucky" Luciano became the new leader. Maranzano had established the code of conduct for the organization, set up the "family" divisions and structure, and established procedures for resolving disputes. Luciano set up the "Commission" to rule their activities. The Commission included bosses from six or seven families.

(Wikipedia)
---

While not an "official scientific study," historians have made the connection of Prohibition to the rise of Organized Crime in America.


Banning is not the solution. What we need is education of young people in self control and the effects of alcohol. When they are eighteen (what the legal drinking age should be) and considered an adult, then we should let them do what they want with their body.

I know full well I was continue to drink, ban or not.

Mario The World Champion
December 9th, 2008, 08:47 PM
Reintroduce the 18th Amendment?! If that would happen, I wouldn't want to live here when all the gangs started bootlegging the stuff and all the crime would increase.

sims796
December 10th, 2008, 12:43 AM
I think you should have to buy alcohol using a special kind of I.D., which keeps a record of how many drinks you've had versus how much time has gone by. In other words, you wouldn't be able to buy any more alcohol if drinking it would put you over the legal limit of intoxication.

Not a bad idea, but I don't want a sitter. We hear plenty of stories of people drinking & driving, and not nearly enough of people drinking and refusing to get behind a wheel. I don't need someone looking over my alchohol because some punk wants to drive drunk.

Guillermo
December 10th, 2008, 12:59 AM
I don't think it should be put back into place. Some people, I know a few close friends like this, drink every day. They love the stuff, alcohol and cigarettes give the government a lot, a lot of money nowadays. If people choose to smoke or drink or whatever the hell it is, let them. They're the ones screwing up their lives and wasting money.

sims796
December 10th, 2008, 01:07 AM
Excuse me for, um, 'counterposting', but I must digress, drinking, and especially smoking, affects everyone surrounding. Well, smoking really, assuming your friends are responsible drinkers (which their not) Kidding!

Srsly, though, it isn't enough to BAN drinking. How else will mannish looking she-males in this city be tollorable without my weekly night drink?

Guillermo
December 10th, 2008, 01:14 AM
I think smoking should be limited, or banned completely for that matter in some areas over others. Places like Hospitals, petrol stations, police stations or somewhere with lots of pedestrians should be no smoking.

Alcohol can't affect anyone except you, apart from the drink driving part so I think Alcohol should remain not banned. Smoking, however should be limited.

sims796
December 10th, 2008, 01:18 AM
Assuming you drink in moderation. akeyhall affects the mind, which causes dumbarses to become even dumber, and putting George W back in office a second time Too late.

When drunk irresposibly, yes, alcohol affects those around you--just not directly, like cigarettes.

Volkner's Apprentice
December 10th, 2008, 07:20 AM
When drunk irresposibly, yes, alcohol affects those around you--just not directly, like cigarettes.

Good point.

I'd also like to take the opportunity to say that drinking isn't nearly as influential in our society as drugs are at the moment. The legalization of marijuana, in my opinion, is stupid, but that's a completely different/uglier topic. When it comes to drinking, as long as it is done in moderation, it can be safe. Obviously you don't drink and drive. Obviously you don't pressure friends into drinking. Obviously you don't throw wild-out-of-control parties at dorms or in your house when the parents leave.

That's obvious, but apparently not to a lot of people. As a side note, I think there are plenty of other fun things to do besides drink and you don't need alcohol for stress-relief and fun times, but people do it anyway. Whatever.

sims796
December 10th, 2008, 09:14 AM
I agree, at least on the mara-jue-wanna, but I do like my occasional drink. Rarely, of course. A party just isn't a party until the first anus slams back a dozen or so bruskies & swing at the pinata.

HeidiMoose
December 11th, 2008, 01:52 AM
Just as any other illegal substance, banned or not, people would still drink.

My own personal experience with alcohol has turned me away from it.
And after dating an alcoholic for some time, I have turned from it even further.

People who drink responsibly are okay with me.
But everytime I hear of a death due to drunk driving (especially if the person that died was the sober driver, or their passengers) I feel infuriated. Or when I hear about adults abusing their children, wives/husbands/bf/gf/fiancee/etc... it really sets a spark of anger in me.

I have friends who partake in both of the following substances. I don't do them, but I've seen how they effect their actions differently..
My personal opinion is this.

If either of these substances should be legal, I would pick Marijuana over Alcohol.
I have my reasons. And I think they make a load of sense. But I'm not going to discuss it any further.

/Circa
December 11th, 2008, 02:06 AM
People will break the law to get something they want, they did it in the 20's, theyre doing it right now.
People ARE breaking the law to get drugs, people are breaking the law to get cigarettes underage, this speaks for itself.

Milke
December 11th, 2008, 03:46 PM
This may have been posted already, but do you know WHY they canceled it?

Because the illegal moonshining business THRIVED during its reign. More people drink(and, consequently, break the law) when it is illegal. Banning it only makes it worse.

Wulf
December 11th, 2008, 03:48 PM
18 Amendment: Banned all alcohol selling, drinking, etc in the US

Then, they stopped it!

Do you think it should be put back into place?

I do. Drunk Driving is the cause of so many deaths nowadays....
Nope, crime went way up when they did it. People still got drunk too. In my opinion, it was a rather dumb choice on our part for the 18th Amendment.

Sagiri
December 11th, 2008, 03:54 PM
Personally, I am against drinking and the like, but do I think it'd help to reinstate it? No, it wouldn't. People who want it don't care about legality issues, all they care about is getting their alcohol.

If the US Government actually could make the people abandon the substances, I'd be for it. But unless they started giving the death sentence to people found with alcohol, people wouldn't listen to the new law, and it'd eventually be reapealed. Again.

Alcohol can't affect anyone except you, apart from the drink driving part so I think Alcohol should remain not banned. Smoking, however should be limited.
Not true. What about your family? Many husbands abuse their wives while drunk, for one thing. Rapes and other crimes are often commited by intoxicated individuals. If you die, you're peers and family will miss you, hopefully, possibly even commiting suicide. Does that really affect no one but you?

Voltagenic
December 11th, 2008, 04:11 PM
I think alcohol should be completely banned. What is its use? Alcohol is only there for economical reasons, just like smoking.

No, alcohol is there for when you've had a rough day and need something to ease the stress a bit. Same with cigarettes. Simply having a beer can't be wrong in any way, unless you do it illegally.

Another thing: It's not like people will instantly stop drinking. People will just bust out the moonshine or brew beer themselves. Also, banning beer would severely hurt the economy. Hmm, aren't we already in a bad recession?

Furthermore, while you might think it's your own freedom to drink whatever you want, you have to take into account how your behavior might impact your surroundings.

Drunken driving is one example. It's one of the main reasons why people die on the roads. Don't give me the "these are idiots" thing; you obviously don't think straight when you're drunk anyways, Einstein.

There is no "might think" about that. You CAN drink whatever you like (whatever is legal anyway). You act as if everyone who drinks drinks doesn't know about moderation or responsible drinking.

Not everyone who drives drunk is an idiot, either, and alcohol doesn't make them one. It's also not idiocy to make the choice to drive drunk, as YOU'RE DRUNK.

Drunken driving is only one example. Others might be family abuse, violence in the streets, and individual health disadvantages. I won't go into these in details because I simply can't bother.

You think alcohol causes all this?

You should start bothering, as your argument is full of holes.

Dakota
December 13th, 2008, 11:30 AM
I really do think it should be banned cause it causes accidents..

MikeZzZ808
December 13th, 2008, 12:22 PM
I think as far as safety goes yes but if you dont drink to much to often alcohol can be ok plus for ever1 person that dies from drinking there is one less person to waste there money/time/life on something as pointless as alcohol

.
December 13th, 2008, 12:43 PM
If we ban alcohol because it causes deaths and problems among people, then why don't we ban soda and McDonalds, which can cause diabetes and overweight kids? Why don't we just ban ____ because it causes ____. We could be here all day just banning things because they can be used in conjunction with some idiotic person to cause harm. The 18th Amendment was one of bloodiest Amendments in American history. Banning of alcohol was what led many of the most animalistic people such as Al Capone and Bugsy Moran to do what they did. Not only that, but alcohol is, you know, optional.

If people thinks drugs are a huge epidemic in America, then there will be even more problems with alcohol. The distrubition of drugs is illegal, or at least drugs such as heroin and cocaine. Now, with only a few of these illegal drugs, many murders and lives are ruined. Considering how much more common alcohol is, the problems could potentially be greater. We defintely don't need such problems such as this in America.

Drugs are much more harmful than alcohol. People live their entire lives drinking and don't die, and can live respectable lives. The same cannot be said about drugs, as addiction and the fact that it's an ILLEGAL SUBSTANCE kind of gets in the way. Eh, this is all my opinion, so don't take it as if I'm correct =[

sims796
December 15th, 2008, 04:53 PM
No, alcohol is there for when you've had a rough day and need something to ease the stress a bit. Same with cigarettes. Simply having a beer can't be wrong in any way, unless you do it illegally.

Another thing: It's not like people will instantly stop drinking. People will just bust out the moonshine or brew beer themselves. Also, banning beer would severely hurt the economy. Hmm, aren't we already in a bad recession?



There is no "might think" about that. You CAN drink whatever you like (whatever is legal anyway). You act as if everyone who drinks drinks doesn't know about moderation or responsible drinking.

Not everyone who drives drunk is an idiot, either, and alcohol doesn't make them one. It's also not idiocy to make the choice to drive drunk, as YOU'RE DRUNK.



You think alcohol causes all this?

You should start bothering, as your argument is full of holes.
I strongly, strongly disagree with a few things here, or at the very least, I disagree with how they are said.

First off, everyone who drives drunk is an idiot. No exceptions. Whatsoever. Now, maybe you worded it wrong, but you make it seem as if drunk driving is not the fault of the one behind the wheel. That is 100% bullcrap, in every sense of the word. Yes, you CHOOSE to drive drunk. If you drink, you better damn well make sure that you are UNABLE TO DRIVE. Slash your tires. Take a cab. Lock yourself out. It is called DRINKING RESPONSIBLY. Just because you are under the influence of alcohol, doesn't excuse your actions. You are still very much responsible for the deaths that you--not alkeyhawl--caused.

There are plenty of other ways to relieve stress other than alcohol, and it is that thinking that gets people in trouble. What if one has a particulary stressful day? How much will you drink to avoid stress?

Now, I am not saying that bad jewish wine is a terrible thing, no, as you said, when drunk responsibly, it is not a bad thing at all. But I say it is more about knowing your limit. One beer may be all it takes to get drunk (freakin' lightweights). My point is, no excuses to those who drink. Just like unplanned pregnacy. You should know the consequenses of your actions, and shoud prepare ahead of time.

RaikaCastillo
December 15th, 2008, 04:58 PM
I really do think it should be banned cause it causes accidents..

So do wild deer (http://www.car-accidents.com/deer-car-auto-accidents.html). Maybe we should ban them :P

sims796
December 15th, 2008, 05:01 PM
If we ban alcohol because it causes deaths and problems among people, then why don't we ban soda and McDonalds, which can cause diabetes and overweight kids? Why don't we just ban ____ because it causes ____. We could be here all day just banning things because they can be used in conjunction with some idiotic person to cause harm. The 18th Amendment was one of bloodiest Amendments in American history. Banning of alcohol was what led many of the most animalistic people such as Al Capone and Bugsy Moran to do what they did. Not only that, but alcohol is, you know, optional.

If people thinks drugs are a huge epidemic in America, then there will be even more problems with alcohol. The distrubition of drugs is illegal, or at least drugs such as heroin and cocaine. Now, with only a few of these illegal drugs, many murders and lives are ruined. Considering how much more common alcohol is, the problems could potentially be greater. We defintely don't need such problems such as this in America.

Drugs are much more harmful than alcohol. People live their entire lives drinking and don't die, and can live respectable lives. The same cannot be said about drugs, as addiction and the fact that it's an ILLEGAL SUBSTANCE kind of gets in the way. Eh, this is all my opinion, so don't take it as if I'm correct =[

I somewhat agree. But the difference between Mickey D's & beer is It's so damn good beer actually has much more drastic consiquences than a Quarter Pounder. No one's ever heard of a car accident because someone had a huge 'Big Mac Attack'. That still doesn't mean it should be banned.

Also, yeah, alcohol can be highly addictive, just like a drug, and with dire effects. Alcohol can be abused.

Remember guies, let's not fool ourselves into thinking that Beer isn't dangerous as it is, even while legal. I say more crime will ensure if it's, if anything.

It's not that I like beer, no. The occasional drink once in a month (if that) for me. personally, I wouldn't cry if it was banned, but as a chef, I cook with it often, so... My main gripe, is that I do not what the RIGHT, our American right to drink, to get taken away. every single amendment has its good and bad points, and in this case, the bad doesn't overweigh the good.

(As for that "everyone's free" amendment, I'm sure there are some ignorant jackarses that thinks they are bad in their eyes).


So do wild deer (http://www.car-accidents.com/deer-car-auto-accidents.html). Maybe we should ban them :P
EDIT: Deer are the cause of all problem in the world, and should be hunted with extreme predjudice.

Melody
December 15th, 2008, 06:39 PM
There's a reason the Prohibition was lifted, because for every drunkard there was about 50 or 60 honest to goodness hardworking people who also enjoyed a drink as well.

Simply put, alcohol, Despite it's many dangers is still widely used as a way to destress. When used in moderation, it is not bad for you. In fact it even HELPS the body. (when enjoyed in small quantities on an occasional basis).

If people are concerned about overuse of alcohol, then there should be laws limiting how much you can have to drink in bars, or how much you can have in your home or on your person. Simple as that. Make it a crime to drink too much.

Rabbit
December 15th, 2008, 06:46 PM
Most history textbooks agree that Prohibition, while a noble experiment, failed miserably. Illegal drinking pubs grew overnight, and were more numerous than the legal pubs had been before Prohibition. The booze served was often not up to standards, sometimes even lethal. Mafia leaders got filthy rich off of bootlegging.

Do you really want to see that come back?

Drugs are much more harmful than alcohol. People live their entire lives drinking and don't die, and can live respectable lives. The same cannot be said about drugs, as addiction and the fact that it's an ILLEGAL SUBSTANCE kind of gets in the way.

So, because something's classified as illegal, it must be more harmful? That's not always the case. Nicotine is one of the hardest addictions to kick, yet cigarettes are legal.

But you do bring up a good point - and I'm sure other people have too, since debates like this bring up common points. Drugs like cocaine, heroin, opium, and meth are illegal in most countries, yet they remain popular throughout the world. Marijuana is technically illegal in Vancouver, but grow-ops (houses dedicated to growing pot) may be Vancouver's most profitable industry and look like they will remain so. It's difficult to ban something effectively. Making a substance illegal may only result in increased profits for those who supply it, because they can raise the price in proportion with the risk that they're taking.

I think as far as safety goes yes but if you dont drink to much to often alcohol can be ok plus for ever1 person that dies from drinking there is one less person to waste there money/time/life on something as pointless as alcohol

All I can say is, I'm glad you aren't running my country, or any other country. :B

sims796
December 15th, 2008, 07:33 PM
There's a reason the Prohibition was lifted, because for every drunkard there was about 50 or 60 honest to goodness hardworking people who also enjoyed a drink as well.

Simply put, alcohol, Despite it's many dangers is still widely used as a way to destress. When used in moderation, it is not bad for you. In fact it even HELPS the body. (when enjoyed in small quantities on an occasional basis).

If people are concerned about overuse of alcohol, then there should be laws limiting how much you can have to drink in bars, or how much you can have in your home or on your person. Simple as that. Make it a crime to drink too much. You're being sarcastic, aren't you?


Read page two. The health benifits are far too small compared to the damage it can do to your body.

Dakota
January 6th, 2009, 02:40 PM
The wierd thing is, they alow teens to drink at times. Thats totally dumb

myfavouriteax
January 6th, 2009, 09:08 PM
BAN ALCOHOL? Have you gone mental???

Callandor
January 6th, 2009, 09:12 PM
Well my father was an alcoholic for a time, though he changed after my sisters were born and my Mom moved out for a while. I believe that it is up to a person to decide how they live their life, and it is wrong for a government to try to control a population, for if given a choice most people will choose to do the sensible thing.

Yeah....I beg to differ on that last part. And i think it shouls be baned.

>Feelings<
January 7th, 2009, 04:02 AM
If a modification of this rule was made, then yes, it should be put back. But the older one shouldn't be.
But then again, the way to change is totally upto the person themselves in the end. Government can only hold it back for a while.
Besides, it ain't bad to a certain extent.

Zorua
January 7th, 2009, 04:58 AM
There would be pros, and there would be the cons to this. The pros to this would probably be less drunk driving, but then again, banishing alcohol would only increase people's desire for it, right?

I don't really see alcohol as bad as smoking, really. I mean, I guess the worst thing it's ever done is kill people because of driving while drunk or too much alcohol consumption. The bolded sentence basically explains why there are so many deaths involving it, IIRC.

Imagine what important celebrations would be like without drinking alcohol. :(

Zet
January 7th, 2009, 05:36 AM
I have to say no to this matter, sure it might "decrease" drunk driving and the such, but whats to stop people smuggling it much like drugs? if it does get banned kids can buy it off the streets from people who smuggle it in, hate me if you must, for my opinion but no one is going to stop you from watching an increase from alcohol poisoning in kids if alcohol gets banned

Icy42
January 7th, 2009, 05:15 PM
I have a mixed opinion on this.

It's true, alcohol is totally evil.

Then again, crime rates sky-rocketed when this happened the first time...

Sora_8920
January 7th, 2009, 05:17 PM
Yep, drunk driving gets you killed..and arrested too. ._.

Dakota
January 16th, 2009, 03:00 PM
What really should have been done is that who ever made beer, etc, should never have done what he did, or else, half of the kids that were kids cause of alcohol would still be here with us...