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View Full Version : Is it easy to set up a linksys router?


M i n a t o //
April 22nd, 2009, 05:23 PM
Title says it all. Since I'm stuck with a terayon tj715x and I can't figure out how to get it to work with my 360, I thinking about trying to just hook the modem (I think that's what it is) to the router and my 360 to the router. *Note: While I have somewhat of a grasp at some computer stuff at the age of 14, I don't know exactly what to do when it comes to connections and stuff.

twocows
April 22nd, 2009, 05:57 PM
Modems are usually related to dial-up. Or, apparently, some forms of broadband internet access.

Routers are annoying in general, and setting them up is no exception. As much as I hate telling you to ask elsewhere, I recommend that you get someone with a bit of tech experience and have them do it for you.

Also, if you're using a wireless access router, set it up with WPA encryption so nobody can leech your internet, or at the very least use WEP encryption (slightly less secure than WPA).

EDIT:
@Petie: Apparently I know less about modems than I thought. I've never really come across for broadband usage, but I don't usually work with setting that up, since most providers do that for their customers.

@enViable: Xbox isn't a form of internet access. You have to have a connection to the internet to use your Xbox online, and dial-up is one way to do that (however slow it may be).

Petie
April 22nd, 2009, 09:16 PM
twocows, that's not exactly true. While a modem is traditionally used as a term for dial-up, all (or at least most, I guess I can't say all with absolutely certainty) broadband connections use modems as well. They're just a little bit different than your traditional dial-up modem.

As for setting it up, assuming you'll be connecting everything with a cable, you're good to go with your plan. Just make sure the output from the modem goes into your WAN or Uplink port and the 360 connects to one of the other ports.

enViable
April 22nd, 2009, 10:43 PM
It's not dial up anyways, it's an Xbox...

M i n a t o //
April 24th, 2009, 04:30 PM
Alright thanks for the info guys.

PowerMac
April 27th, 2009, 08:02 PM
Use WPA2 for you wireless if the router supports it, its the best security on the market for consumer wireless.

Also be sure to update the firmware of the router to the latest version. Linksys releases the updates to fix issues found after the router was released.

Petie
April 28th, 2009, 07:47 AM
I don't know why everyone is so crazy about WPA2. Sure, the security is substantially better (though I'm not sure what you're all doing that you feel you need to hide) but it has one major drawback - outside of computers, almost no other devices support it. This is an especially valid point for the current scenario in which the OP stated the goal was to set up a wireless network for Xbox 360, which does not support WPA2 encryption.

You should definitely encrypt the network but WEP should be more than enough for your purposes and more importantly, will work with all of the devices you may or may not want to connect.

as2
April 28th, 2009, 09:49 AM
I don't know why everyone is so crazy about WPA2. Sure, the security is substantially better (though I'm not sure what you're all doing that you feel you need to hide) but it has one major drawback - outside of computers, almost no other devices support it. This is an especially valid point for the current scenario in which the OP stated the goal was to set up a wireless network for Xbox 360, which does not support WPA2 encryption.

You should definitely encrypt the network but WEP should be more than enough for your purposes and more importantly, will work with all of the devices you may or may not want to connect.

Pretty much most WEP keys can be broken in a couple of minutes! Do not use WEP! Plus WPA keys are easier to remember, anyway!

twocows
April 28th, 2009, 10:11 AM
I don't know why everyone is so crazy about WPA2. Sure, the security is substantially better (though I'm not sure what you're all doing that you feel you need to hide) but it has one major drawback - outside of computers, almost no other devices support it. This is an especially valid point for the current scenario in which the OP stated the goal was to set up a wireless network for Xbox 360, which does not support WPA2 encryption.

You should definitely encrypt the network but WEP should be more than enough for your purposes and more importantly, will work with all of the devices you may or may not want to connect.
The reason everyone is so crazy about WPA2 is because it's actually not ridiculously easy to crack. I can crack WEP and WPA encrypted routers in less than a day (less than an hour for WEP). I can't crack WPA2, it's that simple.

However, you're correct about the compatibility problems. That's not the standard's fault, obviously, it's the vendors' for not putting support in their products. Most game consoles (including the 360 and the DS) don't have support for anything past WEP, which is absolutely ridiculous. On the other hand, I found Nintendo's response to an inquiry as to why the DS only supports WEP to be particularly hilarious.


We have no plans for WPA at this time.

If your concerned about WEP, turn your computers are OFF after you’ve switch to WEP for the DS. I don’t care if The Lone Gunmen are parked outside your door with a van full of equipment trying to bust in your computer files, they can’t do it if your computers are off. And, yes, your wireless router will still work if your computer is off. Um, unless it’s plugged into the same power strip and you power the whole strip off.

If that’s not an option for you, you may want to get the Nintendo USB WiFi Connector, as it works ONLY with the Nintendo DS, and you can leave your other WiFi router with WPA.

NOTE: The reason the Nintendo DS is compatible with WEP, and not WPA, is that we found WEP to be the most prevalent standard for securing wi-fi connections.


I often have problems with the Lone Gunmen trying to break in to my computer. Last time, I pulled an xkcd (http://xkcd.com/341/) and started editing their TCP stream while they were Googling "breaking WPA2 encryption."

On the other hand, they missed the point; people can still leech your internet connection if your computers are off.

Petie
April 28th, 2009, 01:41 PM
The reason everyone is so crazy about WPA2 is because it's actually not ridiculously easy to crack. I can crack WEP and WPA encrypted routers in less than a day (less than an hour for WEP). I can't crack WPA2, it's that simple.

However, you're correct about the compatibility problems. That's not the standard's fault, obviously, it's the vendors' for not putting support in their products. Most game consoles (including the 360 and the DS) don't have support for anything past WEP, which is absolutely ridiculous. On the other hand, I found Nintendo's response to an inquiry as to why the DS only supports WEP to be particularly hilarious.
I didn't mean to imply that there's anything wrong with the WPA2 standard. I agree fully that the vendors are at fault in these situations. My point was that a suggestion of WPA2 for wireless security is often a pointless one due to the setups people are attempting (which usually involve a non-computer device capable of WEP and nothing at all).

As far as cracking WEP and WPA go, you're right. It's easy and can be done in a matter of minutes if you do it correctly. However, how often do you think this is actually going to happen? People who are truly concerned about security (i.e. they have some sort of important/confidential information) should generally stick to purely wired networks anyway.

I do agree that the Nintendo rep's response was rather humorous though not at all inaccurate. The fact of the matter is that a vast majority of wireless networks are secured using WEP (including mine) for the sake of simplicity and convenience in connecting non-computer devices.

Oh, and as2, to add to what I said above, WPA-PSK (the type of WPA you referred to) is just as easy to crack as WEP.