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Ultraviolence
July 28th, 2009, 02:26 AM
Some of you might know that my favorite to study is Astrology and Planetery Pysics[sp?]. So I have come to a point where I wonder, 'Is there life on other planets?'. I already know that Mars used, or could have, harboured some form of primitive life, but how it lost that is a tad complicated. I also know that in our solar system, there are 3 moons that could be hiding life, Jupitier's moon, Europa (vast ocean under frozen ice surface?), Saturn's moon, Echlades (Water under surface) and another of Saturn's, Titan (Thick atmosphere, similar to ours, could have water on surface).

And what about out our Solar System? Serveral planets have been found in other Galaxys, and in our galaxy, the Milky Way.

For life to survive on a planet, it needs a good atmosphere, mainly Oxygen and Nitrogen, water and the Planet needs to be Geologically active.

So, what do you guys think? This was NOT taken from an on-line source, nor a book.

0m3GA ARS3NAL
July 28th, 2009, 03:04 AM
I believe in life on other planets.
I mean, the universe is an infinitely expanding mass of unknown matters, and infinite galaxies.
There isn't a possibility that there is not any life, or even, intelligent life, on another planet somewhere in the void we call the universe.
The cosmos can be a complicated, mysterious place, and still is, but it is my hope to one day travel to around the solar system, or even more!

dragoon944
July 28th, 2009, 04:38 AM
I believe there is plenty of life on different planets. My self being interested in astronomy know that there are thousands and thousands of galaxies and that a possible thousand planets just like ours. So since we are not going to be able to travel to any of these galaxies any times soon, it’s up to you to make up your mind. But I personally think there are thousands of races just like ours, maybe smarter maybe not. The rest is from your imagination to figure out.

Horizon
July 28th, 2009, 04:51 AM
It is impossible for there NOT to be other life on other planets, systems and galaxies. As has been said, the universe is an almost infinite expanse of area that could hold life, and for this planet to be the only one in said expanse is nigh on impossible.

Cherrim
July 28th, 2009, 04:54 AM
I definitely think there's life out there. Whether it's "intelligent" or not, I'm not sure, but I find it absolutely absurd to think that in an expanding "infinite" universe, we're the only planet with life.

Do I think we'll meet/communicate with life from other planets? No, probably not. Not for a looooong time anyway.

Giraffles <3
July 28th, 2009, 07:06 AM
There has got to be something, saying were the only living things in the entire universe makes me feel kind of lonely.

Weatherman, Kiyoshi
July 28th, 2009, 07:12 AM
Life on other planets is possible.
Earth is not just some "accident" that ended up with life.

In fact, there is evidence that we were visted by aliens hundreds on hundreds of years back.
(It's actually quite interesting if you don't know what I'm talking about, I suggest you search it up.)

templekeeper
July 28th, 2009, 07:20 AM
There's no other life elsewhere until proven otherwise. Based on our information at hand, there still may yet be a planet full of staphylococci and Munchlax.

This could be about a year and a half old now, but there was an article on CNN (possibly linked elsewhere) where scientists found a planet that could be hospitable to life (nothing unusual)...but, as usual, it had some sort of additional chemical issue. It's been too long to recall, but the point is why speculate? Sure, there might be, and there also might not be. It's a wild goose chase that has no potential to get anywhere. Giving the final frontier any thoughts altogether is ridiculous. let's say the moon is hospitable all of a sudden because the seas became, well, seas and it gained an air bubble around it. Wonderful, who's going to take the risky ride up there and then the even more risky reentry? The average person is not foolish enough to forfeit their lives like that. There's no point to any of this. You're better off researching literature.

Yamikarasu
July 28th, 2009, 07:44 AM
Life doesn't even need an abundance of oxygen to survive. When the first life appeared on the planet, the atmosphere was mostly CO2 (or something, I just know it wasn't oxygen) and then because of chemical reactions within those early life forms the atmosphere turned into the mostly nitrogen and oxygen mix we have today. The term "life" is pretty vague, and leaves a lot of room for different types of life forms that live under completely different conditions.

One thing we know life like us needs is water, because water allows many different chemical reactions to take place without interference, and it also somewhat protects life from natural processes that would otherwise be destructive (UV rays, etc.). We assume most life is carbon based because carbon can bond with other elements in many life-friendly combinations. An alternative to carbon might be silicon, which would allow life to withstand much hotter temperatures, but isn't as versatile as carbon.

By the way: no, we have not been visited by aliens, unless they can travel faster than light.

Ultraviolence
July 28th, 2009, 07:54 AM
To understand alien visits, you need to understand light speed. For example, if a planet 300 million light years away looked at our planet, they would see dinosaurs.

.Seth
July 28th, 2009, 08:04 AM
I believe there's life on other worlds. As Lightning said, whether they're intelligent or not, we don't know. I believe that Earth might be visited by intergalactic life forms.
Hey, there's a good bit of evidence on UFO's, so something has to be flying them. :\

It makes a bit of sense, if you think about it.

Vyro
July 28th, 2009, 08:16 AM
Actually, there are microscopic things on mars.

Ayselipera
July 28th, 2009, 09:59 AM
If the universe is endless like they say then I'm sure there is other life somewhere out there.

Neutrino
July 28th, 2009, 03:03 PM
Of course there's life on other planets. To those skeptics, it's perfectly plausible for a person to beleive that, since they have not seen it, it is not real. However, it's perfectly unplausible for a person to think that Earth is the only planet with life. Earth is, to all intents and purposes, one planet, out of countless many others. We have all our machines and such, which correspond to our theories, and our laws of physics, then again, our laws are based out our planetary conditions.

The Universe will have ideas of it's own. There will be other forms of life, because they will have different anatomies to us. They will be able to survive in conditions that we can't. Just because organisms on our planet wont be able to live/survive without mechanical aid on other planets - because it's too hot/cold, et cetera - doesn't mean that other forms of alien life wont.

We are not the most advanced race. Our machines can only calculate on our knowledge, and there's nothing to say that our laws of physics are the indefinate, and that they stand only as corresponding to our planet. They do not count on other planets, and, as such, there will be other forms of life, jsut because our machines say that life can't, doesn't mean that they can't. Our machiens aren't the final word. The Universe has ideas of it's own.

Just think: Aliens form another planet will probably be stating that life on our planet is impossible, because our planetary conditions contradict what they deem as conditions able to hold life, because their anatomies are used to a different climate. It's exactly the same.

And our machiens aren't god, anyway. There may well be life on mars, jupiter, saturn, whatever. Our machines just probably can't pick it up. Heck, we're not exactly superadvanced, are we?

In short, yes, there is alien life. :D

Oh, The Places You'll Go.
July 28th, 2009, 03:58 PM
If there is no life beyond our planet, it is an incredible waste of space.

Xairmo
July 28th, 2009, 04:07 PM
http://i686.photobucket.com/albums/vv229/deserteagle357/Funny/Hillary-Alien.gif

Aliens -- They're closer than you think.

2A4Rulez
July 28th, 2009, 04:33 PM
I think its kind of stupid that people think that to support life air and water is needed. There could be a type of alien that lives in space without water or air.

.little monster
July 28th, 2009, 05:15 PM
There's no other life elsewhere until proven otherwise. Based on our information at hand, there still may yet be a planet full of staphylococci and Munchlax.

This could be about a year and a half old now, but there was an article on CNN (possibly linked elsewhere) where scientists found a planet that could be hospitable to life (nothing unusual)...but, as usual, it had some sort of additional chemical issue. It's been too long to recall, but the point is why speculate? Sure, there might be, and there also might not be. It's a wild goose chase that has no potential to get anywhere. Giving the final frontier any thoughts altogether is ridiculous. let's say the moon is hospitable all of a sudden because the seas became, well, seas and it gained an air bubble around it. Wonderful, who's going to take the risky ride up there and then the even more risky reentry? The average person is not foolish enough to forfeit their lives like that. There's no point to any of this. You're better off researching literature.
Just because you don't know of it, that doesn't mean it is non-existent.

I don't know you, I guess you don't exist.
Actually, there are microscopic things on mars.
Never proven.
If there is no life beyond our planet, it is an incredible waste of space.
...
http://i686.photobucket.com/albums/vv229/deserteagle357/Funny/Hillary-Alien.gif

Aliens -- They're closer than you think.
xD

I believe there is life on other planets. I believe it is impossible for there not to be. Space is too fast, you also have to do the math for the approximate number of Earth-like planets.

The Scientist
July 28th, 2009, 10:17 PM
The original Drake equation:
http://upload.wikimedia.org/math/8/4/7/847914dec26cc45ac2957da0054683de.png

Can be rewritten as
http://upload.wikimedia.org/math/0/c/3/0c37795c9852444997db9eac0a0ee2b3.png

N is the number of civilizations in our galaxy in which communication might be possible
N* is the current number of stars in the galaxy
R* is the average rate of star formation per year in our galaxy
fp is the fraction of those stars that have planets
ne is the average number of planets that can potentially support life per star that has planets
fℓ is the fraction of the above that actually go on to develop life at some point
fi is the fraction of the above that actually go on to develop intelligent life
fc is the fraction of civilizations that develop a technology that releases detectable signs of their existence into space
L is the length of time such civilizations release detectable signals into space.

There are other factors involved, such as reappearance and messaging variables, but in short, the equation currently states that there is extraterrestrial life. They may not be broadcasting radio waves yet, they may not even be multicellular. But even Mars has fossilized microbes, and that's practically next door.

ThePowerful1
July 29th, 2009, 12:54 AM
wut. wut y wuld ther b aliens?

Wings Don't Cry
July 29th, 2009, 02:47 AM
I believe I saw this documentary where they discovered a very simple jellyfish like creature in the oceans of Neptune, but they weren't intelligence and they were nearly microscopic and 98% water.

Neutrino
July 29th, 2009, 07:01 AM
People who think that, in all of the Universe, Humans and things that live on Earth are the only species, are just stupid.

icyace
July 29th, 2009, 07:03 AM
There has to be life on other planets, we're not the only species!

mike182
July 29th, 2009, 07:08 AM
i think its possible that there could have/will be life on other planets
if there WAS life on other planets it probably occurred similarly to earth but there may not have been enough water, oxygen, etc. to support that life

and this is just my idea i could (and probly am) be totally wrong

Neutrino
July 29th, 2009, 07:16 AM
Mike, the other life that is on other planets will probably not need water and oxygen to survive. Remember, they will msot likely have different anatomies to us, so they'll have adapted so they can live on the planet's own natural sources.

Haza
July 29th, 2009, 04:38 PM
Its kinda odd to assume with no proof that we are alone in this universe.

The Scientist
July 30th, 2009, 07:43 PM
I support nitrogen-based life.

Åzurε
July 30th, 2009, 09:35 PM
I personally don't think there's other life out there, but if there was, I wouldn't lose my mind or anything.

Gary, the Magic Fairy
July 30th, 2009, 09:47 PM
I don't know. There are tons of people who think.. "There are trillions and trillions of planets out there, so odds are, one of them has some form of life." But... why?

Okay, the universe is... bigger than we can imagine, lets say infinite. Going by this, there are also an infinite amount of galaxies, stars, solar systems, and planets. Lets say the universe always has been and always will be. Time is infinite in both directions. Forever and always.

People seem to take time out of the equation when they assume there's extraterrestrial life out there. What if there isn't life out there yet? What if we're too late, and missed them? What if they never evolved past microscopic life forms? What if they aren't far enough along to develop intelligence yet?

99.9% of all terrestrial beings are extinct. Life is fragile. What's to say they still exist? We won't be around forever. Eventually we'll go the way of the dodo or Tasmanian tiger. Lets face it, we're lucky to have made it this far. We're flying through space, dodging asteroids, slowly using up our natural resources, irreparably damaging our planet... why would extraterrestrials be luckier? Maybe their last 0.1% finally got it too.

Then there's another problem: we're basically stuck here, and there's no reason to assume that any currently living extraterrestrials have more advanced technology than us and are on a planet close enough to stumble upon us... or that they care. Maybe they aren't as obsessed with other planets as we are, and just worry about their own?

So... even if there is currently life on another distant planet, we're almost certainly too far away for it to effect us in any way. And if there's unintelligent life somewhere within reach, like a moon in our solar system, like microscopic organisms, then we won't be around long enough for them to evolve into anything interesting. If by some ridiculous chance they're animal-like in intelligence, then... whoo, aliens? So what if there's like- jellyfish on Neptune or something? We probably can't bring them here, we for sure can't go there, so... it still doesn't really effect us, other than getting everyone excited and causing them to waste more time, money and effort looking for more when they could be doing something useful on Earth.

tl;dr = It doesn't matter because it's basically impossible for us to contact each other, if they're even alive at this point in time.

Idiot!
July 31st, 2009, 04:58 PM
Back here on Earth, we are not the only species. Look at the lizards, birds and fishes.

Out there, probably there is some sort of life form.

Mizan de la Plume Kuro
August 1st, 2009, 05:27 AM
I'm a fairly scientific and religious person so here's my view.

Life is a relative term. Generally we think something is a living being when it is carbon/nitrogen/ect. based manifestation of something that can grow and reproduce. However, as I've said, life is a relative term. There could be other forms of life that are not element based nor are physical. They could be photon based, heat based, energy based life forms that do not necessarily have to grow old or reproduce. They would not even have to think.

Basically, what I'm trying to say is. With other creatures, the definition of life varies. For example, a rock at the side of the road. It does not breathe, does not grow, does not reproduce, and it doesn't think. To us, that would mean that it was not a living organism. But, from a rock's point of view, it is there it exists and it has cousins (i.e. gravel, quartz, heavy metals) therefore from its point of view it is a living thing. To it, humans could just be natural phenomena.

Life as I've said is a very relative. Who's to say that beams of light are not life. Even more radical would be, beings made of light. Beings made of heat. Who knows, maybe dark matter is a sentient form of life that makes up much of the mass of the universe.

If, you're still insistent on life on other planets. More commonly speaking, intelligent life. You can use the Drake Equation.

The Drake equation states that:
http://upload.wikimedia.org/math/8/4/7/847914dec26cc45ac2957da0054683de.png where:
N is the number of civilizations (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Civilization) in our galaxy in which communication might be possible; and
R* is the average rate of star (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Star) formation per year in our galaxy (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milky_Way)
fp is the fraction of those stars that have planets (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Planet)
ne is the average number of planets that can potentially support life (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Life) per star that has planets
fℓ is the fraction of the above that actually go on to develop life at some point
fi is the fraction of the above that actually go on to develop intelligent (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intelligence) life
fc is the fraction of civilizations that develop a technology that releases detectable signs of their existence into space
L is the length of time such civilizations release detectable signals into space.[2] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drake_equation#cite_note-1)

Captain Hobo.
August 1st, 2009, 06:10 AM
If there is any life out there we have not proved it yet.

Azonic
August 1st, 2009, 04:09 PM
I don't know. There are tons of people who think.. "There are trillions and trillions of planets out there, so odds are, one of them has some form of life." But... why?

Okay, the universe is... bigger than we can imagine, lets say infinite. Going by this, there are also an infinite amount of galaxies, stars, solar systems, and planets. Lets say the universe always has been and always will be. Time is infinite in both directions. Forever and always.

People seem to take time out of the equation when they assume there's extraterrestrial life out there. What if there isn't life out there yet? What if we're too late, and missed them? What if they never evolved past microscopic life forms?There are a lot of 'What if's to this topic. The point is that we suspect that there ARE other life forms on other planets at this very moment based on the theory that the universe must hold another planet with life because of its colossal size.

It would just be awkward for me to think that this is the only planet in the WHOLE universe to hold life at this very moment.
What if there isn't life out there yet? We'll never be 100% sure of that unless we analyze every possible planet in the universe. We're looking for nearby lifeforms; if they aren't out there yet then that's too bad for us.
If we find out that life has existed on a planet before, then that would play a clue in a theory that will lead us to find out how life began on earth. There's a big mystery for ya.
What if they haven't evolved past microscopic organisms yet? Well, regardless of what stage of evolution they are at, analysis can, as mentioned previously, aid in studies in how life on earth began and related subjects.

I am a strong believer of the theory that we aren't alone in this universe. Theres a HUUUGE amount of space in ... space. It would be ridiculous to think that we, as small as the earth is compared to the universe, would be the ONLY creatures alive.

99.9% of all terrestrial beings are extinct. Life is fragile. What's to say they still exist? We won't be around forever. Eventually we'll go the way of the dodo or Tasmanian tiger. Lets face it, we're lucky to have made it this far. We're flying through space, dodging asteroids, slowly using up our natural resources, irreparably damaging our planet... why would extraterrestrials be luckier? Maybe their last 0.1% finally got it too.

Then there's another problem: we're basically stuck here, and there's no reason to assume that any currently living extraterrestrials have more advanced technology than us and are on a planet close enough to stumble upon us... or that they care. Maybe they aren't as obsessed with other planets as we are, and just worry about their own?

So... even if there is currently life on another distant planet, we're almost certainly too far away for it to effect us in any way. And if there's unintelligent life somewhere within reach, like a moon in our solar system, like microscopic organisms, then we won't be around long enough for them to evolve into anything interesting. If by some ridiculous chance they're animal-like in intelligence, then... whoo, aliens? So what if there's like- jellyfish on Neptune or something? We probably can't bring them here, we for sure can't go there, so... it still doesn't really effect us, other than getting everyone excited and causing them to waste more time, money and effort looking for more when they could be doing something useful on Earth.

tl;dr = It doesn't matter because it's basically impossible for us to contact each other, if they're even alive at this point in time.Curiosity killed the cat, I suppose. You know a large amount of science is tied into the same point you make. You could apply your point to historical studies, such as what happened before our generation, how the earth began, study of dinosaurs, etc.
If there is any life out there we have not proved it yet.I did not know that.
wut. wut y wuld ther b aliens?
Massive failure at trolling.

Yuoaman
August 1st, 2009, 07:27 PM
Of course there is other life out in the Universe, what form this life takes however, is debatable.

Samurai X
August 25th, 2009, 03:02 PM
I am a believer of the Rare Earth theory. I believe that life is very rare in the universe and that the properties of life on Earth and everything that is necessary for there to be life like the size of the planet, star, the presence of an atmosphere, satellites, and many more things is very rare in the universe. While I do believe there is life out there I don't think it's quite as common as everyone believes. Also, to the people who are saying the universe is infinite, it's not, the space in the universe is infinite but mass and matter are finite. It is in theory infinitely expanding and if that theory is true, which it probably is, then we are all going to die eventually because the temperature will eventually reach absolute zero which is the temperature at which molecules stop moving. This is called heat death and it is inevitable. This of course if we survive the destruction of life on our planet by our sun. Yup, the long term future looks bleak for all life.

Or you know, God could save us all.

Richard Lynch
August 25th, 2009, 04:55 PM
The original Drake equation:
http://upload.wikimedia.org/math/8/4/7/847914dec26cc45ac2957da0054683de.png

Can be rewritten as
http://upload.wikimedia.org/math/0/c/3/0c37795c9852444997db9eac0a0ee2b3.png

I'm impressed someone else is familiar with the Drake equation. Carl Sagan used it, and I even saw him calculate it once on Cosmos. If I remember, the number is surprisingly low, and some factors involved in the equation are based on assumptions, which slightly diminishes the quantitative aspect of it. But I still like it, and highly respect Drake for coming up with it.

Arthur C. Clarke made a small speech in Stanley Kubrick: A Life in Pictures that will always stay with me. I don't remember it verbatim, but I'll see if I can get the general gist of it down:

"Behind every man now alive stand thirty ghosts, for that is the ratio by which the dead outnumber the living. Since the dawn of time, roughly a hundred billion human beings have walked the planet Earth. Now this is an interesting number, for by a curious coincidence there are approximately a hundred billion stars in our local universe, the Milky Way. So there is enough space in just our Galaxy for everyone living, and everyone who has ever lived, to have their own world." - Arthur C. Clarke

To think that there is not life out there somewhere is somewhat presumptuous. Probability-speaking, it's less likely that there isn't life out there, when you think about it.

EDIT:

It is in theory infinitely expanding and if that theory is true, which it probably is, then we are all going to die eventually because the temperature will eventually reach absolute zero which is the temperature at which molecules stop moving. This is called heat death and it is inevitable. This of course if we survive the destruction of life on our planet by our sun. Yup, the long term future looks bleak for all life.

It's still debated if Absolute Zero could be even reached. I believe we've come close to 0.0 K, but never got to it. We also don't know what would happen if we ever did. If electrons stopped moving, it's possible the matter would just fall apart. But, taking magnetic force into account, it could be highly dangerous. There are many possibilities! Although, new suns are being formed every day, so it's not like the Universe will become a barren wasteland of giant rocks. Not to mention the rate at which the Universe is expanding is diminishing, if I remember.

Now, Heat Death (the theory) assumes that Entropy will continue to the logical extreme, but doesn't take into account random chance. It's kind of like the absolutist theories, but applied to the inverse. In that sense, Heat Death is rather hard to believe. I was always a fan of the Big Crunch myself (a nice, almost epic closure), but I think that's basically been proven wrong, right? But still, who wouldn't want to become a Black Hole Singularity? haha

Or you know, God could save us all.

I kinda doubt that. :-)

Jolene
August 25th, 2009, 05:21 PM
I do think that there's life out there somewhere, considering how huge the universe is. I also think that some of it may be as intelligent or more intelligent than humanity. I hope that in the future, people from Earth will be able to make friends with people from other worlds.

Yoshimi
August 25th, 2009, 05:25 PM
Although the chances are pretty low of life forms remotely similar to us arising, I don't believe that out of the whole universe, this tiny blue dot is the only place for life. Life can arise in certain conditions, so maybe not all planets need to be similar to ours to hold the same life forms. They just had to be similar in the primordial form.

I can't believe I forgot about the water channels on Mars, and how Venus was formed similarly to Earth early in its life. If this is all possible in our own solar system, why can't it in distant galaxies?

IcyArceusRider
August 25th, 2009, 05:36 PM
I definitely believe there is life on other planets.

I highly doubt that this life is located in our solar system, or else we probably would've already found it. Also, it may not be in our galaxy, either. But surely, there's life somewhere. In a neighboring galaxy, maybe? Or in a galaxy that's farther away? There's got to be life somewhere out there besides planet Earth. ^^

♣Gawain♣
August 27th, 2009, 08:48 AM
LOL

I can't count on how many post like this I've posted. Probably 10th or something.


There's life out there, but we don't know it yet. We don't have the technology to communicate, or even detect life(advanced or simple) forms on the space. The universe's so big(observable=+15 billion lt. years) that's impossible, I repeat impossible that we are the only living forms in this universe. There may be 3 or more in our galaxy(rare yeah, can be calculated in the theoretical Drake's equation. But that's not the answer, it's an assumption on how rare other life forms), maybe they're just bacterias, but definitely life.

And maybe on other galaxies, we don't just know it. All hail little green men!

22sa
August 27th, 2009, 11:26 AM
I suppose we could colonize Saturn's moons one day. Observing Saturn's beauty would automatically make those moons worth living on, right?

So the colonists spent their days studying Saturn, drinking the moon's water, communicating with earth, writing new fantasy stories.

Traveling to the moon shouldn't be a big deal given our nuclear propulsion technology. Only problem is that the cost isn't really justifiable. I'd personally give a good share of my income into colonizing Europa's moons, but I doubt society on the whole cares to.

I don't believe there's life out there within a distance of 4 light years way from earth. The only planets that's been seen so far are gas planets. And gas planets are only good for eye candy.

Beyond 4 light years away from earth, there's no reason for there not to be an resourceful, habitable planet with the right climate somewhere though. I don't think there's life there, but I'd love for mankind to bring life there.

The Scientist
August 27th, 2009, 10:18 PM
I was always a fan of the Big Crunch myself (a nice, almost epic closure), but I think that's basically been proven wrong, right? But still, who wouldn't want to become a Black Hole Singularity?

http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y270/TristinCrow/Forum/Bill_Nye_Expert.jpg

I support the Big Crunch theory.

As more and more matter is "formed", the total amount of gravity increases (more dips and pockets in space-time). Eventually, the force of gravity will be enough to halt the universal expansion and pull everything back inward. The now-ultracompressed, ultraheated matter will likely explode with a force equal to the original Big Bang.

In short, Big Bang, Crunch, repeat ad infinitum.

One thing I think is interesting is the concept of matter conservation. The particles that make me could, in the next iteration of the universe, make a new human...

Long-term reincarnation, anyone?

I wonder which generation of the universe we're in. Maybe the first... maybe the 8th... maybe more?

s0nido
August 28th, 2009, 01:04 AM
Obviously, there'd be life on other planets. It might not be intelligent, but there should be life somewhere else in the universe. I mean, the universe is so extensive that it would be impossible for there not to be other life forms.

dc_united
August 28th, 2009, 05:30 AM
There is life out there, and probably more advanced then us. Think about it- we're late starters in evolution. We had to wait 65 million years or more for our ancestors to grasp the concept of walking on their hind legs. Maybe if dinosaurs had never been wiped out by a massive asteroid that raised all seven levels of hell in 10 minutes, maybe raptors would be the dominant species and already be making contact with aliens.

Searching for life in the galaxy with the methods available to us now is like looking for a minnow in an Olympic-sized pool filled with ink. Next to impossible.

Now Earth is a fairly new planet (4.5 billion years estimated) there are going to be star systems twice as old as ours, and those would probably be the ones that hold life. And if the life out there is taking the same approach to the search for life that we are, God help us all. Scanning deep space for radio waves is not the way to search for life. It's a waste of time, money, and resources.

Further more, our scientists have somehow gotten the idiotic idea that all life has to evolve on planets exactly like ours. There could be methane based life or silicon based life. If it's a chemical, then it's possible that some kind of life evolved around it. Which means we shift our gaze away from the big picture and into a smaller and smaller area of interest.

1KewlDude
August 28th, 2009, 07:32 AM
Life on other planets is possible.
Earth is not just some "accident" that ended up with life.

In fact, there is evidence that we were visted by aliens hundreds on hundreds of years back.
(It's actually quite interesting if you don't know what I'm talking about, I suggest you search it up.)lol... you don't even understand how much of an accident it is that there is life on Earth. It was a miracle that a mass just the right size collided with Earth and formed the moon, which we wouldn't be able to live without. It's a miracle that the Earth is in just the right position to be the right temperature for life to exist. It's a miracle that Jupiter was created, it protects us from many floating masses in space with it's size, imagine if it wasn't there one of it's moons could have collided with Earth... wouldn't have been pretty. Also there were like a million things that happened which made it impossible for life to exist. For example, at one time the oceans contained a lot of iron, the iron would form compounds with oxygen to form iron oxide (rust). It would collide with land and stay there, but of course inevitably the iron ran out meaning that the oxygen which was being created by a very simple life form known as stromatolites (I think) was finally able to released out into the atmosphere.

I'm sure there are a few more miracles as to how life is sustainable on Earth and because of all the miracles we should be grateful for our lives. Based on the fact that all these miracles happened, I find it hard to believe that another planet is as lucky as ours. However, I had a discussion with a science teacher about this and he told me that considering there are millions of galaxies which contain many solar systems with stars and planets the chance that a miracle like Earth could happen at least one more time is actually quite likely.

Also, someone commented about life being able to sustain itself without oxygen or water and I see how you could think that but it's highly unlikely. All organisms (that we know of) need oxygen for respiration which occurs in every cell of our body. This converts glucose into energy which separates us from rocks. With energy we can perform all of the life processes that make us living: move, respire and grow. It could be possible, but I don't see how that could happen.

The Scientist
August 28th, 2009, 09:59 AM
lol... you don't even understand how much of an accident it is that there is life on Earth. It was a miracle that a mass just the right size collided with Earth and formed the moon, which we wouldn't be able to live without. It's a miracle that the Earth is in just the right position to be the right temperature for life to exist. It's a miracle that Jupiter was created, it protects us from many floating masses in space with it's size, imagine if it wasn't there one of it's moons could have collided with Earth... wouldn't have been pretty. Also there were like a million things that happened which made it impossible for life to exist. For example, at one time the oceans contained a lot of iron, the iron would form compounds with oxygen to form iron oxide (rust). It would collide with land and stay there, but of course inevitably the iron ran out meaning that the oxygen which was being created by a very simple life form known as stromatolites (I think) was finally able to released out into the atmosphere.

I'm sure there are a few more miracles as to how life is sustainable on Earth and because of all the miracles we should be grateful for our lives. Based on the fact that all these miracles happened, I find it hard to believe that another planet is as lucky as ours. However, I had a discussion with a science teacher about this and he told me that considering there are millions of galaxies which contain many solar systems with stars and planets the chance that a miracle like Earth could happen at least one more time is actually quite likely.

Also, someone commented about life being able to sustain itself without oxygen or water and I see how you could think that but it's highly unlikely. All organisms (that we know of) need oxygen for respiration which occurs in every cell of our body. This converts glucose into energy which separates us from rocks. With energy we can perform all of the life processes that make us living: move, respire and grow. It could be possible, but I don't see how that could happen.

First mistake: "that we know of".
Second mistake: Anaerobic life does exist.

Restating: life may not necessarily need exact-Earth conditions to exist. Life adapted to Earth, not the other way around.

1KewlDude
August 28th, 2009, 10:12 AM
First mistake: "that we know of".
Second mistake: Anaerobic life does exist.Could you name some please?Restating: life may not necessarily need exact-Earth conditions to exist.I never said that it wasn't possible, I just said that we have no proof that life can live without certain things such as water. I'm not too sure about oxygen, but one thing I do know is that astronomers normally look for water on a planet as a first sign of possibility that there is life on the planet.Life adapted to Earth, not the other way around.Well that's like saying that there is life of every planet and that life on each planet has adapted to it's own planet... I think not lol. Life adapts to Earth as it changes, but for life to begin certain things had to have happened and conditions met... I don't see anything living on Mars lool

poopnoodle
August 28th, 2009, 10:36 AM
Could you name some please?http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anaerobic_organism

I never said that it wasn't possible, I just said that we have no proof that life can live without certain things such as water. I'm not too sure about oxygen, but one thing I do know is that astronomers normally look for water on a planet as a first sign of possibility that there is life on the planet.Scientists actually go through various methods in searching for extra-terrestrial life. They seek radio signals and laser beams, examine meteorites, etc. Other characteristics they look for are sulfur and carbon dioxide.

Well that's like saying that there is life of every planet and that life on each planet has adapted to it's own planet... I think not lol. Life adapts to Earth as it changes, but for life to begin certain things had to have happened and conditions met... I don't see anything living on Mars lool Evidence indicating that floating liquid has existed on Mars at one point has been found, the idea that life could have taken place on Mars at one point is conceivable.

1KewlDude
August 28th, 2009, 10:53 AM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anaerobic_organismThanks, but this is not intelligent life... it's bacteria lol

I don't believe that complex and intelligent life such as humans can exist without water and oxygen.Scientists actually go through various methods in searching for extra-terrestrial life. They seek radio signals and laser beams, examine meteorites, etc. Other characteristics they look for are sulfur and carbon dioxide.That may be true but it doesn't suggest that scientists believe that life can exist without water and oxygen.Evidence indicating that floating liquid has existed on Mars at one point has been found.Floating liquid...? There is actually water on Mars which is frozen. However the conditions aren't correct for life. I believe I heard that very simple life-forms have been discovered on mars but they were dead or something, meaning that at one point the conditions were livable. It is believed that if a proper atmosphere was created on Mars with enough CO2 to create a global warming effect humans could live on Mars as the atmosphere would be better and the temperature would be suitable.

Desert Spirit!
August 28th, 2009, 10:58 AM
I strongly Believe that there are life in other Worlds! It is impossoble that Earth is the only planet that holds life! The Universe is Huge and Vast our Technology is not to advanced yet to even get out of our Solar System..So there is no proof that there are Life in other Moons and Planets, but there is gotta be Life out there!

twocows
August 28th, 2009, 11:08 AM
People who think that, in all of the Universe, Humans and things that live on Earth are the only species, are just stupid.
Call me stupid, I'll call you stupid back. Stupid.

Don't make personal attacks based on someone's thoughts on something that can't be proven true or false. That just makes you an idiot.

Personally, I prefer to speak in terms of odds. I'd say there's probably a 1/40 chance of there being other life in the universe. However, I'd say it's closer to 1/4000 for there being other intelligent life in the universe. The process that likely spawned the first organisms on our planet (probably similar to the viral organisms we see today) would not require circumstances that are that unusual. However, for those organisms to evolve into something with human-like intelligence would be extremely unlikely.

22sa
August 28th, 2009, 11:29 AM
If there's another planet with climate like earth, there should be life on it.

But it doesn't matter at all if there's life on it, what matters is actually finding another planet like ours.

How big's the milky way I wonder...

piece of something
August 28th, 2009, 01:39 PM
it doesn't even have to have a similar climate to earth...for all we know they may not need oxygen to survive like we do...they could drink liquid magma and poop granite...

anyway...there is life on other planets. i know this. trust me.

Venusaur♣
August 28th, 2009, 03:22 PM
I believe in life on other planets.
I mean, the universe is an infinitely expanding mass of unknown matters, and infinite galaxies.
There isn't a possibility that there is not any life, or even, intelligent life, on another planet somewhere in the void we call the universe.
The cosmos can be a complicated, mysterious place, and still is, but it is my hope to one day travel to around the solar system, or even more!
I agree, there can be life on other planets, there is still unexplored planets that could hold life.

♣Gawain♣
August 29th, 2009, 04:47 AM
If there's another planet with climate like earth, there should be life on it.

But it doesn't matter at all if there's life on it, what matters is actually finding another planet like ours.

How big's the milky way I wonder...

For all I know, the candidate for an earth-like planet(including climate) is Gliese 581 d, whose star is a red dwarf. Maybe there is life because it resides in the habitable zone of a star, which varies depending on the type of star. If it's a dwarf, the HZ is close to the star. If it's a giant, then the HZ will be farther out.

And our galaxy's size is approx 100,000 light years across.

it doesn't even have to have a similar climate to earth...for all we know they may not need oxygen to survive like we do...they could drink liquid magma and poop granite...

anyway...there is life on other planets. i know this. trust me.

Maybe. But today, life requires water and oxygen.

lx_theo
August 29th, 2009, 07:43 AM
I believe finding life on other planets is inevitable assuming we don't get wiped out ourselves. Until then, we can only speculate, and I believe there is. People do need to understand that evolution is a very long process. Life found may be in early to later stages.I think earlier stages are much more likely, but that's dependent on whether its easier for life to astart or species to evolve. Later stages had followed many routes in that evolution that went hand in hand with their planet's environment, probably creating something completely different that anything we've ever seen. To assume sentient life otherwise is going to be oxygen breathing humanoids seems a bit arrogant to me.






Maybe. But today, life requires water and oxygen.
Really? Cause on earth we do have bacteria that east rock. And from my knowledge, bacteria is life as well.

Graceful
August 29th, 2009, 08:40 AM
There MUST be life on other planets, otherwise the universe is wasted!

TRIFORCE89
August 29th, 2009, 01:19 PM
I definitely think there's life out there. Whether it's "intelligent" or not, I'm not sure, but I find it absolutely absurd to think that in an expanding "infinite" universe, we're the only planet with life.

Do I think we'll meet/communicate with life from other planets? No, probably not. Not for a looooong time anyway.
^^^^

This. Just about word for word.

22sa
August 29th, 2009, 01:55 PM
For all I know, the candidate for an earth-like planet(including climate) is Gliese 581 d, whose star is a red dwarf. Maybe there is life because it resides in the habitable zone of a star, which varies depending on the type of star. If it's a dwarf, the HZ is close to the star. If it's a giant, then the HZ will be farther out.

And our galaxy's size is approx 100,000 light years across.



Maybe. But today, life requires water and oxygen.Interesting! I wish we could learn more about it.

Imagine if we sent a spaceship traveling 2 000 000 m/s from earth and it collides into something haha.

But if all speed is relative, shouldn't the spaceship be able to continously accelerate, eventually past 2 998 000 m/s relative to the earth, past the speed of light?

But too bad, even if a spaceship reachers Gliese, it'd never be able to communicate with earth. =[

Earth and Gliese are related in that our solar systems both orbit the black hole in the centre of the Milky Way, but relation is like... way beyond the time we little human lives deal with. Maybe the studies into dark matter can reveal new, faster connections, humanly useful connections between Gliese and Earth.

Darn! How will we conquer our Galaxy!? XDDD Hehe!

piece of something
August 29th, 2009, 04:26 PM
Maybe. But today, life requires water and oxygen.

There is no way we can be sure of that when considering the entire universe.

♣Gawain♣
August 31st, 2009, 03:07 AM
Really? Cause on earth we do have bacteria that east rock. And from my knowledge, bacteria is life as well.

I forgot to mention intelligent life forms. Anaerobic bacterias can live without air, but subsist on chemicals on water.

Interesting! I wish we could learn more about it.

Imagine if we sent a spaceship traveling 2 000 000 m/s from earth and it collides into something haha.

But if all speed is relative, shouldn't the spaceship be able to continously accelerate, eventually past 2 998 000 m/s relative to the earth, past the speed of light?

But too bad, even if a spaceship reachers Gliese, it'd never be able to communicate with earth. =[

Earth and Gliese are related in that our solar systems both orbit the black hole in the centre of the Milky Way, but relation is like... way beyond the time we little human lives deal with. Maybe the studies into dark matter can reveal new, faster connections, humanly useful connections between Gliese and Earth.

Darn! How will we conquer our Galaxy!? XDDD Hehe!

That's the real danger on speed of light travel. But the distance between large objects in space is so large. Even our nearest star system is very far, 4.3 light years from Earth

The theory of relativity of Einstein doesn't permit F.T.L. travel. Which explains the superluminous velocities of some quasars.

We will conquer the galaxy in 100,000 years! LOL

s0nido
August 31st, 2009, 01:13 PM
So maybe we haven't actually seen any life on other planets besides Earth, but that's only because we lack the ability to fly beyond our solar system. The only object we have sent beyond our solar system is the Voyager space probe, and we're going to lose contact with it by the year 2020, at which point it wouldn't have gone far enough to have reached even another star. Therefore, there isn't any evidence to conclude that there isn't any life outside of our solar system, but neither is there any evidence to conclude that there is. Yes, people say that the universe is too large for us to be the only life forms that exist, but it's not impossible for that to actually be true.

22sa
September 3rd, 2009, 09:14 PM
I forgot to mention intelligent life forms. Anaerobic bacterias can live without air, but subsist on chemicals on water.



That's the real danger on speed of light travel. But the distance between large objects in space is so large. Even our nearest star system is very far, 4.3 light years from Earth

The theory of relativity of Einstein doesn't permit F.T.L. travel. Which explains the superluminous velocities of some quasars.

We will conquer the galaxy in 100,000 years! LOL
1 year = 31 556 926 seconds.

An object accelerating at 30 (m/s)/s from earth would be able to reach past the speed of light in 100 000 seconds, which is only a little more then a day in time.

Is it really impossible to give the spaceship enough initial fuel to force it into constant 30 (m/s)/s acceleration for a day? I guess so. The amount of fuel that would take would make the spaceship too heavy to launch. Okay, that's a given. But this is where a space station can make the difference.

Mankind builds a space station for spaceship launching somewhere in space where the gravity exposed to it is only a fraction of what it is on the surface of the earth. On the space station enough fuel is available for a day of constant 30 (m/s)/s acceleration, and because of the low gravity experienced, the mass of the rocket becomes irrelevant, and it won't matter how many thrusters and fuel tanks you had to attach (and detach in space, perhaps) anymore, because any mass be accelerated when there's no gravity countering such acceleration.

Physically it's possible to force an object to travel faster then the speed of light relative to earth, but there's no way to avoid an accidental interstellar space collision with it, eh?

Also, I wonder what man's vision would become when he's traveling faster then the speed of light relative to objects in space, since vision based on light absorption. Majorly distorted view? xD We'd need computers to correction our vision, I guess.

♣Gawain♣
September 4th, 2009, 07:44 AM
Physically it's possible to force an object to travel faster then the speed of light relative to earth, but there's no way to avoid an accidental interstellar space collision with it, eh?


Einstein says that a body will be gaining infinite mass if it travels at speed of light, and you cannot add energy because it can't go faster. You'll be contradicting it I guess.

The only way that we can travel "faster than light" is through theoretical wormholes, which never been proven. You can travel from one point to another but you'll became a noodle after that.

We don't know, but we'll sure be waiting.

Virtual Chatot
September 4th, 2009, 12:56 PM
Einstein says that a body will be gaining infinite mass if it travels at speed of light, and you cannot add energy because it can't go faster. You'll be contradicting it I guess.

The only way that we can travel "faster than light" is through theoretical wormholes, which never been proven. You can travel from one point to another but you'll became a noodle after that.

We don't know, but we'll sure be waiting.Wormholes operate on the principle of folding space-time to get from point A to point B. There's no speed involved, because wormholes bend the space around the them. Speed is found by the equation time x distance, which won't work with wormholes if there is no time taken between point A and B.

For any effective space travel, the bending of space will be the only viable option.

22sa
September 4th, 2009, 06:00 PM
What the heck is bending of space? I can't even imagine it.

I get sucked in a wormhole sort of black hole like, then come out somewhere else in space as a noodle? xD Omg, I want to see a simulation of that.

Mathematically what is stopping an object from traveling faster then 2 998 000 m/s relative tot he earth though? Suppose you send two objects going 1 800 000 m/s from opposite ends of earth, would they not be moving at 3 600 000 m/s away from each other? Or is it when I zoom at 3 500 000+ m/s past the stars in space, something bad will happen? O.o

Does the answer lie in dark matter ? o.o

No, you fail
September 4th, 2009, 06:06 PM
honestly i think the only other "life" out there would be a single celled organism of some sort and not a more advanced species like human's and if there is another advanced species we surely would have found trace's such as floating space "junk" from them.

SonicThrust
September 4th, 2009, 07:09 PM
I definitely believe that there are other life forms out there, whether they are intelligent or not is another discussion.

♣Gawain♣
September 4th, 2009, 09:10 PM
What the heck is bending of space? I can't even imagine it.

I get sucked in a wormhole sort of black hole like, then come out somewhere else in space as a noodle? xD Omg, I want to see a simulation of that.


Does the answer lie in dark matter ? o.o

Number one, space can be bent around very massive objects, which has a lot of gravity. Imagine a bed(space-time fabric) with a bowling ball(the massive object) in the middle of it. The bed is deformed around the ball, and it's the mechanism and principle for a black hole(which explains the optical illusions and warping of light near massive celestial objects). Black hole have an infinite amount of density and therefore, has an infinite gravity. Place a marble beside it and see what happened, the marble gets down the bowling ball. But it's different in a true scenario. When you're near one, you'll feel the enormous gravity and turbulence around you as you slowly(and painfully stretches you to the point you're as thin as a noodle) go down the event horizon. And time also slows down there.

Dark matter is postulated because on the account that the universe has more matter than previously thought. The visible matter we see today counts merely a fraction than the dark matter. And dark matter can only be detected through it's gravitational effects, like the one I've stated above(they say that black hole is a kind of dark matter, but I don't really believe...). I don't know, maybe we could "harvest" this DM and use it as energy, if it has energy...

Virtual Chatot
September 5th, 2009, 09:32 AM
Another good example, to add on to what Rigel said, are those spiral wishing wells for coins.
http://ep.yimg.com/ca/I/igumballs_2067_61853685
The coins rolls around and around in the cone until it eventually falls into the hole, which is reminiscent of a object being drawn and falling into a black hole. The only reason planets don't ( usually... ) collide with their stars or quasars is because the star doesn't have infinite mass, so we're not being completely drawn into the center.

---

Anywho, back to the topic discussion. Life can exist in any form all over the universe, life doesn't necessarily need water, oxygen, or even the same proteins we're made out of in order to exist.
There could be creatures made of out of rock living on a lava planet that would be completely uninhabitable to us.

Zorua
September 5th, 2009, 02:18 PM
I highly doubt that we're the only ones in the solar system. There should be life, in my opinion, even the tiniest spec of bacteria would be enough as proof to me that there's life; I mean alien species don't exactly have to be 3 million years ahead of us in technology and knowledge and heck they don't even have to walk upright or speak English.

But that's just me, though. I just find it really hard to believe we're the only planet with life on it.