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Cartmic
January 27th, 2010, 12:54 AM
Lovely :)

Forget lofty ideals about the open-source community: most Linux kernel code is written by paid developers at major corporations.

The Linux world makes much of its community roots, but when it comes to developing the kernel of the operating system, it's less a case of "volunteers ahoy!" and more a case of "where's my pay?"

During a presentation at Linux.conf.au 2010 in Wellington, LWN.net founder and kernel contributor Jonathan Corbet offered an analysis of the code contributed to the Linux kernel between December 24 2008 and January 10 2010. (The kernel serves as a basis from which individual distributions such as Ubuntu, Debian or Red Hat are developed, though these will often add or remove specific features.).... Click the URL for more http://apcmag.com/linux-now-75-corporate.htm

Bianca Paragon
January 27th, 2010, 1:13 AM
Repost. Please try and keep up with what's already been posted before you post.
Thanks!

Archer
January 27th, 2010, 1:48 AM
Eh, it should mean an even better quality kernel. I'd pay for it anyway...

Zet
January 27th, 2010, 2:32 AM
Eh, it should mean an even better quality kernel. I'd pay for it anyway...

It would be the new Macintosh OS

Archer
January 27th, 2010, 3:48 AM
It would be the new Macintosh OS
Hardly. If it gets too commercial, people will go back and redevelop the kernel themselves.

Bianca Paragon
January 27th, 2010, 4:56 AM
So what you're saying is that they'll always be amateurs because they can't work to business principles?

Zet
January 27th, 2010, 4:58 AM
Hardly. If it gets too commercial, people will go back and redevelop the kernel themselves.

Right, because there's still thousands of BSD distro's are around

twocows
January 27th, 2010, 7:30 AM
I'm pretty sure it's actually been like this for years. Linux is primarily used in a corporate environment except for hobbyists. I'd like to see projects like Ubuntu and Fedora fulfill their goals of bringing a usable free platform to the masses, but even if it was a perfect system, MS and Apple are too deeply rooted in the consumer for it to take off. Still, I do use the LTS releases of Ubuntu on at least a few computers.