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thekidflash
February 25th, 2010, 05:52 PM
Athlon II Dual Core 2.8 Ghrtz
Asus Motherboard
EVGA Videocard
4 GB ram

Etc etc.

The computer I have is problematic. And frankly I think it's going to die now.
Along with the Powersource, the Ram, Windows 7 and the Hard Drive, this wil cost 700 dollars. Compared to my current PC, including my Laptop it will be substantially superior. (Which, if this is actually a crappy build? It's still saying alot!)

*Sigh*

Anybody else have any computer related triumphs and woes?

twocows
February 25th, 2010, 07:09 PM
Athlon II Dual Core 2.8 Ghrtz
Asus Motherboard
EVGA Videocard
4 GB ram

Etc etc.

The computer I have is problematic. And frankly I think it's going to die now.
Along with the Powersource, the Ram, Windows 7 and the Hard Drive, this wil cost 700 dollars. Compared to my current PC, including my Laptop it will be substantially superior. (Which, if this is actually a crappy build? It's still saying alot!)

*Sigh*

Anybody else have any computer related triumphs and woes?

Your processor is a bit weak, and the price shouldn't come near $700 if you're building yourself.

As for woes, all my equipment has been breaking recently. Plus, I borrowed a friend's mouse (my old one broke), and it just disappeared, which makes me very unhappy. I'll be checking at home this weekend, but I'm kind of worried I'll have to buy him a new one in addition to the one I just bought myself.

thekidflash
February 25th, 2010, 07:27 PM
It's weak compared to what's available, but what do I need a Quad for anyway?

I think I'd barely notice the difference. Newegg is where I'm getting the parts, and I'm always willing to take a recommendation to get the same or more for less.

Archer
February 26th, 2010, 01:10 AM
It's weak compared to what's available, but what do I need a Quad for anyway?

I think I'd barely notice the difference. Newegg is where I'm getting the parts, and I'm always willing to take a recommendation to get the same or more for less.
If you're gaming or doing anything remotely processor-intensive, consider going with a Phenom II X2 555/550. They clock in at 3.2/3.0 GHz respectively (iirc) and have a 7 MB cache, as opposed to the Athlon's 1/2MB. That really makes a difference. You can always go with an Athlon X4 if you need. They work out about the same as the Phenom X2, price-wise. Although if you want a quiet machine, I'd be careful going with the AMD X4s on their stock coolers. I've got a Phenom X4 965 @ 3.6GHz and it's bloody noisy on the stock cooler, I just haven't had the chance to upgrade to something quieter. You can pick up great coolers for ~$30 bucks.

Give us a bit of an idea of what you want to be doing with it - then we can get a better idea of what you need. If you're gaming, you want to go with a nVidia Geforce 250 or ATI Radeon 5750 or better, depending on budget.

twocows
February 26th, 2010, 07:44 AM
It's weak compared to what's available, but what do I need a Quad for anyway?

I think I'd barely notice the difference. Newegg is where I'm getting the parts, and I'm always willing to take a recommendation to get the same or more for less.
I didn't mean get a quad, I'm not a fan of them atm either. I meant what Archer said.

thekidflash
February 26th, 2010, 08:49 AM
I'm playing Star Trek Online which is a bit too much for my Computer that's going down the way of the scrap heap soon. I usually just play MMOs and run programs like CS2 and Poser. Among other things. My old computer handle it, but It's about to die within the next year I think.

So a Phenom two is the way to go, eh?
What about Motherboards to go with it?

twocows
February 26th, 2010, 08:52 AM
I'm playing Star Trek Online which is a bit too much for my Computer that's going down the way of the scrap heap soon. I usually just play MMOs and run programs like CS2 and Poser. Among other things. My old computer handle it, but It's about to die within the next year I think.

So a Phenom two is the way to go, eh?
What about Motherboards to go with it?
If you don't want your old computer, you could always donate it. There are a lot of groups that take old computers and re-purpose them for poorer families, and you don't have to worry about the cost of disposal (computers have to be disposed in a special way in many places because the composition of many computer parts include heavy metals).

Or I'll take it, if you want. I'm a big fan of old computers. :D

Personally, I prefer Intel's i5 line of dual core processors over anything AMD is currently making. As for a motherboard, I'd suggest Asus, Gigabyte, or MSI (my favorite is Asus, especially for higher end boards).

thekidflash
February 26th, 2010, 09:10 AM
Okay, so what's the recommended gaming build for under 700? I'm keeping the case I have, so I'm just replacing the parts.

twocows
February 26th, 2010, 09:42 AM
Okay, so what's the recommended gaming build for under 700? I'm keeping the case I have, so I'm just replacing the parts.
Processor (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819115215), $200
Good graphics card (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814127464), $200, or passable graphics card (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814127478), $100
Motherboard needs to be correct form factor. If your case can accept MicroATX (likely), try one of these: MSI (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813130256), GIGABYTE (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813128420) (both are ~$100). I recommend the MSI.
Memory: you have to do your own work here; you're probably going to want two 2GB 240-pin modules, preferably DDR3, but it depends on what motherboard you get.
Power supply: you'll need to figure out the power supply on your own; you definitely won't need more than 800W and probably won't need more than 600W.

If you don't want to build your own, you can try here (http://www.cyberpowerpc.com/system/CyberPower_P55_Configurator/), you can build a pretty good computer for about $800.

thekidflash
February 26th, 2010, 09:52 AM
Might actually do that.

Do you shop there ever? The customer reviews aren't that bad, as compared to Ibuypower.

Archer
February 27th, 2010, 06:17 AM
Yeah, unless you're adding a aftermarket HSF and overclocking, then an i5 or even a high-end Core 2 Duo will service you nicely. Their stock coolers are far better.

The graphics card depends on your screen resolution, as much as the games you're playing. If you're using a 1900x1080 or 1680x1200 monitor, you'll need a 256-bit card.

twocows
February 27th, 2010, 09:33 AM
Might actually do that.

Do you shop there ever? The customer reviews aren't that bad, as compared to Ibuypower.
I've bought from there before, yes. They make good quality stuff.

thekidflash
February 27th, 2010, 09:47 AM
Their good reviews are good, but when you look at the bad reviews- Nightmares. =/

I don't know if I want to risk it.

Serene Grace
February 27th, 2010, 12:48 PM
I successfully overclocked on my first go. Now that is a feat!

Archer
February 27th, 2010, 08:07 PM
I successfully overclocked on my first go. Now that is a feat!
By how much? It's easy to get a small increase, but if you start gaining a few hundred MHz, then it's worth it. And someone should revive, remake the "Post your computer" thread.

Oh, what did you decide on, thekidflash?

thekidflash
February 27th, 2010, 08:57 PM
I havn't decided on anything yet. I'm really confused. If I buy the build I have in my newegg cart I can have it all buy Wednesday to build over the weekend.

If I go with Cyberpowerpc, which I have a problem with because I really don't trust them, and they don't seem to have the parts I want- It'll take two weeks.

More over I would really like to keep my case because that I way I can also keep my data HD and transfer programs faster.

But then the computers at Cyberpower would be prebuilt and I wouldn't have to worry about breaking things since I've never done this before.

It's a dilemma.

Archer
February 27th, 2010, 09:12 PM
I havn't decided on anything yet. I'm really confused. If I buy the build I have in my newegg cart I can have it all buy Wednesday to build over the weekend.

If I go with Cyberpowerpc, which I have a problem with because I really don't trust them, and they don't seem to have the parts I want- It'll take two weeks.

More over I would really like to keep my case because that I way I can also keep my data HD and transfer programs faster.

But then the computers at Cyberpower would be prebuilt and I wouldn't have to worry about breaking things since I've never done this before.

It's a dilemma.
I meant had you decided on the contents of the build yet? What are the contents of your newegg cart?

Oh, I'd stick with rebuilding old machines if you've never done a build before. At least until you're confident that you won't break anything. And what's stopping you transferring the old HDD over as a data drive in the new machine? What's your old case?

thekidflash
February 27th, 2010, 09:32 PM
ASUS M4A785TD-V EVO AM3 AMD 785G HDMI ATX AMD Motherboard (http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboDealDetails.aspx?ItemList=Combo.334787)

AMD Phenom II X2 545 Callisto 3.0GHz Socket AM3 80W Dual-Core Processor Model HDX545WFGIBOX (http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboDealDetails.aspx?ItemList=Combo.334787)

EVGA 512-P3-N871-AR GeForce 9800 GTX+ 512MB 256-bit DDR3 PCI Express 2.0 x16 HDCP Ready SLI Support Video Card (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814130339)

CORSAIR XMS3 4GB (2 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model CMX4GX3M2A1600C7 (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820145285)

I am actually just rebuilding my PC. I have no desire to get a new case or what not.
My case is an Xblade.

Archer
March 1st, 2010, 04:04 AM
The 8800 is huge, and inefficient. I'd suggest the ATI 5750 at a similar price mark. Also, Corsair RAM is a rip off. Kingston and G-Skill are reliable and much cheaper.

twocows
March 1st, 2010, 06:10 AM
After some recent discussion, I've been convinced that ATI has a better product line than Nvidia at the moment. I agree with Archer's suggestion, though I might suggest upping it to the 5770 if you can afford it (it's a very nice card). If you're going with a 4770, definitely get this one (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814150369&cm_re=4770-_-14-150-369-_-Product), since it has a lifetime warranty (and don't forget to send in for the rebate).

I also agree that Corsair is a ripoff; my personal suggestion is Kingston.

If your computer is an ATX form factor, I believe you should also be able to install a microATX board, since it maintains backwards compatibility, so keep that in mind.

linkinpark187
March 2nd, 2010, 10:20 AM
I personally like Nvidia more than I do ATI, but that's just my preference. I would recommend that instead of going with a 9800 you go with one of the 200 series cards, they are much more efficient as the architecture is better built than that of the 9 series, and is still in the same price range as the 9800. I would also suggest this processor, so long as money is not a big constraint: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819103656&Tpk=Phenom%20II%20X4%20925

I just got that myself, and the amount of performance increase from my Phenom II x4 940 (my 940 was a 3.0GHz, but also AM2+, the one I'm suggesting is AM3). I like using Lost Planet: Colonies for benchmarking (not completely, though), and with this processor I noticed a 15-20 fps increase. It was incredible! So, if you're going to be doing any gaming, I would recommend a quad core because there are many games that utilize multi-core CPU's.

And I'm going to agree with Archer and twocows here. Don't go with Corsair. I myself would recommend either G.Skill or Crucial, but Kingston is another good, trustworthy brand. :D

Archer
March 3rd, 2010, 03:12 AM
I agree with Archer's suggestion, though I might suggest upping it to the 5770 if you can afford it (it's a very nice card).Yeah, I've got a 5770, but it's a little further up the price bracket, which is why I didn't recommend it. I have the Sapphire Vapor-X Version, which is really quiet and cool, but you pay about 5% more for it.
If your computer is an ATX form factor, I believe you should also be able to install a microATX board, since it maintains backwards compatibility, so keep that in mind. There's little point installing a micro-ATX when you don't have to. All it does is limit you in regards to expansion. That said, it doesn't hurt either.

I personally like Nvidia more than I do ATI, but that's just my preference.
At the moment, ATI simply has a better range at better prices. This isn't an ATI vs nVidia question, it has more to do with what is a better choice right now.
So, if you're going to be doing any gaming, I would recommend a quad core because there are many games that utilize multi-core CPU's.Firstly, I would make sure that you go with at least a 3GHz Phenom, if you run with one. There is a performance spike with them at 3GHz+ but I can't be bothered to pull out the benchies. Also keep in mind that the Phenoms X4s run hot. Hot, combined with AMDs half-assed coolers means noisy. If you're capable and you intend to get one of these, get a aftermarket cooler, such as the Coolermaster Hyper 212+ (really cheap) or the Thermalright Ultra 120 (higher end). Noctua also makes great and quiet fans, but they're so damn ugly.

While I'm here, I'd like to pipe up and say that you are better off with a Phenom X2 than an Athlon X4 for gaming. Or and i5-750 is a good option if you want to consider Intel, but avoid the i5-600 series, they're a joke.

linkinpark187
March 3rd, 2010, 08:16 AM
I knew I forgot something...

Like Archer said, if you're going with the Phenom x4, get an after market cooler. I would actually highly recommend this one, though: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835103046

I've got one in my system, and it keeps the processor VERY cool. My original cooler was the CoolerMaster Hyper Z600, but that was too big, and I was always afraid it was going to damage the motherboard (which it doesn't look like the Hyper 212+ would do that). The great thing about CoolerMaster coolers is that they come with a series of brackets so you can fit them to almost any socket. :D

Archer
March 7th, 2010, 02:36 PM
I now have a 212+ and wouldn't go back. It keeps my Phenom 6^C cooler at all times and is almost silent at max RPMs. Not bad for a $35AU cooler :D. Keep in mind that 6^C is a lot for an AMD chip, as their heat range is about 35-60^C, whereas Intels (Core 2 Duos, for instance) run between 30-80^C.

* ^C is degrees celsius. I really cbf putting in the degree sign.

twocows
March 7th, 2010, 08:18 PM
Stock cooling has always worked fine for me. I've never had processors melt or anything like that. $35 isn't a bad deal, though; even I'd consider that.

Archer
March 9th, 2010, 03:04 AM
Stock cooling has always worked fine for me. I've never had processors melt or anything like that. $35 isn't a bad deal, though; even I'd consider that.
The noise is the issue. Sure, it keeps it cool enough, but only with enough noise to wake my family members. It was really that bad. 75mm fans just make so much noise for the same cooling capacity. You can also mount it NW or ES, although you have to be careful the heatpipes don't block RAM dimms with heat spreaders. With the fan NS, that is.