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Meduza
March 11th, 2011, 09:23 PM
Have you ever heard of Shakespeare?

Have you ever read one or more of his works?

Do you like his work?


Before High School, the most I knew about Shakespeare was seeing random cartoons with a parody Romeo and Juliet.

The first piece of work I read of his was ironically Romeo and Juliet, and there was more to it than I imagined.

Personally, I am not a fan of his work and I don't get why it's aprt of the English Curriculum. I like the main plot of his stories, but I don't like how it's in Old English.

Why read stories in a format we don't speak or ever will speak again?

Elite Overlord LeSabre™
March 12th, 2011, 04:48 AM
Have you ever heard of Shakesphere?Yes.

Have you ever read one or more of his works?
Romeo and Juliet, Macbeth, and Hamlet in high school.

Do you like his work?
It's better than most of the stuff we read in English literature class, though that's not saying much... Shakespeare still isn't anything I would pick up and read for the fun of it...

WriteThemWrong
March 12th, 2011, 09:21 AM
Have you ever heard of Shakesphere?
yes

Have you ever read one or more of his works?
caesar, romeo and juliet, hamlet; in that order

Do you like his work?
Ugh god no. I can't stand his stuff. I really hate how he muddles up his language unnecessarily with ridiculous syntax and creating words. His stories have great plots and story elements but they just read really awkward.

Cassino
March 12th, 2011, 11:25 AM
Have you ever heard of Shakesphere?
Is this Shakesphere an artist who parodies Shakespeare? Assuming that was just a mistake, then yes I am familiar with Shakespeare.

Have you ever read one or more of his works?
Not on my own accord.

Do you like his work?
No. I suppose it was good at the time but it's all so troperiffic (http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/Troperiffic) nowadays that his work almost seems like a string of references and nothing more. Of course the truth goes the opposite way, with modern things having elements taken from Shakespearean works, but I'm still more of a Chaucer person at the end of it all.

Liliana Vess
March 12th, 2011, 12:16 PM
Have you ever heard of Shakesphere?
Yes, unfortunately.
Have you ever read one or more of his works?
Forced to yes ¬.¬
Do you like his work?
Absolutely hated it.

Shanghai Alice
March 12th, 2011, 12:29 PM
Have you ever heard of Shakesphere?
He's that guy that sells Oxi-Clean, right...?

Have you ever read one or more of his works?
Lessee...
Julius Caesar, Taming of the Shrew, and Romeo and Juliet.

Do you like his work?
Actually, yeah. I think he's utterly hilarious, when he wants to be. Taming of the Shrew made me giggle nonstop.

Captain Hobo.
March 12th, 2011, 05:20 PM
1. Yes, I have heard of him.

2. No, I have not read his work.

3. No, because I don't like poetry.

Esper
March 13th, 2011, 11:11 AM
Have you ever heard of Shakesphere?
Sounds like an great name for a rock band.

Have you ever read one or more of his works?
Hamlet, Macbeth, A Midsummer Night's Dream, Romeo and Juliet, The Taming of the Shrew, The Tempest, The Winter's Tale, Much Ado About Nothing. And I've seen movies of others.

Do you like his work?
I enjoy some of them. It's not my favorite thing to read ever, but it's good enough for me although I'd rather see it performed than to read it, but since that doesn't happen often enough I settle for movies.

moments.
March 20th, 2011, 04:33 AM
Have you ever heard of Shakespere?
Shakespeare, without the 'h', yes I have. ;)

Have you ever read one or more of his works?
I've studied quite a few of his plays for english and literature and theatre studies at school, so I think I've covered all the main ones, and some of his smaller ones.

Do you like his work?
I love it. As an actor and a literature student, he is a joy to read and study. My favourite of his plays are easily Hamlet and Richard III and Othello (but only for Iago) because the plots/characters are the ones I enjoy the most.
As an actor, I like Shakespearean plays because they are often easier to memorise lines because of the rhyming couplets and the rhythm of the iambic pentameter flows so well as you recite a monologue! :D

Yuoaman
March 21st, 2011, 09:49 AM
I don't know Shakespere, but I do enjoy Shakespeare's plays.

XtinaIsMeLuvinWWE
March 27th, 2011, 06:47 AM
Have you ever heard of Shakespeare?
Yes indeed I have lol :)

Have you ever read one or more of his works?
The Merchant Of Venice, The Tempest, A Midsummer Night's Dream and Twelfth Night

Do you like his work?
Reading through them by yourself can be intimidating, but I absolutely love his plays once the basics have been explained and I can analyse them for myself :)

wakachamo
March 27th, 2011, 06:58 AM
There's more 'dumb' in this thread than there is hydrogen in the universe.

Misheard Whisper
March 28th, 2011, 10:32 AM
^ Seconded

Have you ever heard of Shakespeare?
Yes. Yes, I have.

Have you ever read one or more of his works?
Multiple. I studied King Lear for a random project in eighth grade, I was in the school production of Hamlet in ninth grade - the same year we studied The Merchant of Venice in class. The following year we did The Tempest and then last year was Richard III. This year we're going to be doing Henry IV. Also, I've seen several put on live, including Pericles, Prince of Tyre, The Taming of the Shrew and A Midsummer Night's Dream and I've read a couple just for kicks.

Do you like his work?
Oh yes. Literary genius. I don't understand how people can't see how amazing of a writer Shakespeare is. I think that people call him boring simply because that's how they've been conditioned. Shakespeare has been the stereotypical 'it thing' to study in English class for so long, because it's been old and 'boring' for so many years. As well as that, people tend to hate on what they don't understand - somebody up there ^ even mentioned s/he didn't like Shakespeare because it was written in 'Old English'. Wrong! Old English is a much, much more ancient form of the language we speak today - Shakespeare wrote in Early Modern English, which is how we can understand it at all. And just because there are lots of unfamiliar words doesn't mean you can't read it. Most editions of Shakespeare's plays nowadays include footnotes/sidenotes on every page, especially school ones, and in any case, there's little you can't pick up with a little common sense.

SquirtleGirl
March 28th, 2011, 10:49 AM
Do you like his work?
Oh yes. Literary genius. I don't understand how people can't see how amazing of a writer Shakespeare is. I think that people call him boring simply because that's how they've been conditioned. Shakespeare has been the stereotypical 'it thing' to study in English class for so long, because it's been old and 'boring' for so many years. As well as that, people tend to hate on what they don't understand - somebody up there ^ even mentioned s/he didn't like Shakespeare because it was written in 'Old English'. Wrong! Old English is a much, much more ancient form of the language we speak today - Shakespeare wrote in Early Modern English, which is how we can understand it at all. And just because there are lots of unfamiliar words doesn't mean you can't read it. Most editions of Shakespeare's plays nowadays include footnotes/sidenotes on every page, especially school ones, and in any case, there's little you can't pick up with a little common sense.

Seconded also. This is basically what I was preparing myself to type but you saved me the bother :)
All my English teachers are so enthusiastic about him that it's hard not to feel enthusiastic too and feel kind of like you've achieved something.

Have you ever heard of Shakesphere?
Obviously x3

Have you ever read one or more of his works?
"Hamlet" and "Romeo and Juliet". I liked Hamlet because its storyline has been a little less exploited than R&J and its generally more exciting but the content was a little heavy for me x.x Romeo and Juliet was alright but I did it for my exams when I was 15 so I guess we didn't go into as much detail as we have in "Hamlet"


Do you like his work?
Yes I do :) I can appreciate the beauty of his verse and the way the stories are written. So what if they're written a little different to any other studied plays? For their time, they're genius, and once you can get your head around the way its written, the plot isn't that hard to understand.

WriteThemWrong
March 28th, 2011, 12:02 PM
There's more 'dumb' in this thread than there is hydrogen in the universe.
just noticed that this thread is spelled wrong. "Shakesphere?" That's an eight ball isn't it. Shakespeare is the writer.

anyways, has anyone heard of the theory that shakespeare isn't the writer of his works? Shakespeare Authorship (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shakespeare_authorship_question)

Saltare.
March 31st, 2011, 11:07 AM
I knew about Shakespeare before going into the 7th grade. Obviously, knowing about Romeo and Juliet since we read it in my 6th grade English class and we're reading it again in my freshman English class.

I've only read Romeo and Juliet. But, in my upper classmen years, we're going to be reading Hamlet.

I love Shakespeare's work! Love the "sex jokes", as my teacher likes to say, that he incorporates. But film companies sometimes make me hate it. We're watching a Romeo and Juliet movie in class now and it's the 1996 one with Leonardo DiCaprio. I personally hate it but everyone else loves how "modern" it is. I prefer the 1968 version, myself.

Kyoko
April 1st, 2011, 09:47 PM
^ agreed, I hate the films so much, I couldn't stay awake through Leo's version it was so badly done imo.

I love Shakespeare's work, I actually enjoyed reading his plays throughout high school. I read Romeo and Juliet freshman year, Julius Caesar Sophomore year, and then Hamlet and Othello my senior year.

I didn't really enjoy Romeo and Juliet or Julius Caesar as much as I liked Othello or Hamlet. I love how they're basically old english soap operas. Someone tells a lie to someone else, that gets everyone mad and throws them into a killing tirade, someone finally learns the lie was a lie and realizes they killed the wrong people and then kill themselves is basically the plot of most of those works hahaha. At least Othello ;)