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Warrior Rapter
June 28th, 2011, 09:04 PM
Would anyone like to talk dinosaurs? I'm an aspiring paleontologist, so dinosaurs are kinda my thing. My favorite has always been the Velociraptor, it's kinda where part of my name came from (and those of you who will probably feel the need to point it out, it's misspelled in my name for a reason). I'm also kinda fond of the Stygimoloch, in my opinion one of the most, pardon language here, bad-ass cephalosaurids. Anyone have any thoughts?

~*!*~Tatsujin Gosuto~*!*~
June 29th, 2011, 10:54 AM
I hope you are majoring in that in college so good luck on your dreams. Anyways, my favorite dinosaur would have to be a Stegosaurus (is that how you spell it) I just like how its shorter than most dinosaurs and the plates or spikes.


:t354:TG

Beechlgz
June 29th, 2011, 11:38 AM
I hope you are majoring in that in college so good luck on your dreams. Anyways, my favorite dinosaur would have to be a Stegosaurus (is that how you spell it) I just like how its shorter than most dinosaurs and the plates or spikes.


:t354:TG

I dunno about that, wasn't stegasaurus one of the 'big' dinosaurs of the Jurassic? It's back arched pretty high and its plates gave it extra height. There were probably more dinosaurs that were shorter than stegosaurus than there were that were taller. Sorry I didn't mean to nitpick I was just correcting you there, nothing personal lol.

Stygimoloch looks a lot like some depictions of dragons to me. The skull on wikipedia has some rare skin impressions, too.

I like all prehistoric beasts including dinosaurs.

metronome
June 29th, 2011, 02:34 PM
:DDD

I love the chinese feathered dinosaurs (Dilong, Sinosauropteryx, etc.), and their later bird relatives, as well as a lot of the Ornithopods.

Mostly, though, I just like reading up on their evolution and unique adaptations, especially their differences from modern reptiles.

Naruto Uzumaki
June 29th, 2011, 02:55 PM
It's nice that you want to be a paleontologist, I was debating on becoming one too XD

My favorites would have to be....
Nanotyrannus, for those who don't know what it is, it's basically a smaller version of a T-rex (Which it was thought to be a juvenile one, but they're still debating on whether it's true or not so we don't know if it's the same or different) and they basically have narrower teeth, thinner head, and some of it's body features were extended. They've only found two 'juvenile' specimens so they can't really make a definite answer on what it's maximum length is.

Oviraptor, for those who don't know what it is, it's a small, bipedal theropod dinosaur that's name means 'egg thief'. It was basically thought to steal other dinosaurs eggs due to the fact they found it on top of a nest, but later on it was proven that the eggs were in fact it's own so now the name is kind of off, but it's still pretty unique. The shape of it's skull is a lot different that other theropods.

Carcharodontosaurus, for those who don't know what it is, it's one of the largest, if not the largest theropod (meat eating) dinosaur that has been found, and unlike other theropods, it's skull was more closer to raptors then other large theropods. It's been guessed to be 12-13 meters long 6-15 tons!

Well, I'll stop for now seeing as I'm not at home at the moment. I'll be back!

DoctorSlavic
June 29th, 2011, 06:52 PM
*Gasp* My favorite subject!

Well, I am more partial to the predecessors to the dinosaurs, but I'm still a fan. My favorites would probably have to be...

Spinosaurus. No explanation for what this is because you shouldn't need one.

Utahraptor, really big raptor, though no one has actually found a good skeleton of it.

Anomalocaris, a very prehistoric creature that is the first apex predator.

Also:
My favourite was the brontosaurus.
This is a mjor sadface, because the brontosaurus never existed... according to science. It is now known as the Apatosaurus. Just like Pluto.

Warrior Rapter
June 29th, 2011, 08:47 PM
This is a mjor sadface, because the brontosaurus never existed... according to science. It is now known as the Apatosaurus. Just like Pluto.

I'll be honest here, there are some theories that paleontologists have come up with recently that I disagree with. Although the Brontosaurus -> Apatosaurus isn't one of them, I felt like that was kind of a cue.

The main ones I disagree with are how some think the Tyrannosaurus Rex was a scavenger instead of a predator, and how there's research being done about the Velociraptor having feathers. With the T-rex one, I'm sorry, I don't know what whoever thought of this theory was thinking. You don't get a creature THAT BIG living off of scraps, granted they were pretty big scraps, but still. The T-rex skull even has characteristics of a predator.

As for the Velociraptor theory, it's not so much the theory I disagree with, but how they try to portray it. Velociraptors were viscious pack hunters, we know that, we have fossil evidence of that. It stands to reason they would try to be stealthy on the hunt, in my opinion, because of that. I'm sorry, but having like three-inch long feathers sticking out like they have been ruffled does not seem stealthy. My picture of a Velociraptor is either the classic scales or if they did have feathers, something closer to the Vivosaur, V-Raptor, in the Fossil Fighters game.

@Tatsujin, I plan on it but, at the moment, money issues have kept me from going to college. That's why I'm still just aspiring. XD

.,AhKeno*
June 29th, 2011, 09:19 PM
Dinosaurs r koolhttp://www.whereispepper.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/10/Dinosaurs_Lasers.jpg

Anybody here ever play Dinosaur Safari? game where you take picture of different dinosaurs.

I know people on here played Fossil fighters, I got a deinchus.

Warrior Rapter
July 2nd, 2011, 06:09 PM
Never heard of Dinosaur Safari to be honest. I'm curious about it now.

Question for everyone: Whats your favorite dinosaurs of the following catagories?

Carnivore - Mines Velociraptor, of course
Herbivore - Probably the Ankylosaurus
Flying - Quetzalcoatlus, just because it has a really unique name XD
Water-dwelling - Plesiosaurus, the swimming long-neck

DoctorSlavic
July 2nd, 2011, 09:05 PM
Carnivore: Utahraptor. Sheer mystery and power.
Herbivore: (Not fans of these types, but...) Dracorex!!!! <3 Primeval
Flying: Also Quetzalcoatlus, or maybe Archeopteryx (sp?), unless Meganeura counts...
Water-Dwelling: Brontoscorpio all the way.

Gymnotide
July 2nd, 2011, 09:08 PM
Paleo is really fantastic. You should definitely go into that (I would know).
Velociraptors are also one of my favorites, but did you know that their entire bodies were covered with feathers and they had wings? ;)

DoctorSlavic
July 2nd, 2011, 09:23 PM
Paleo is really fantastic. You should definitely go into that (I would know).
Velociraptors are also one of my favorites, but did you know that their entire bodies were covered with feathers and they had wings? ;)

*GASP* Wait, re- oh yeah. That's right. Though I'm a bit rusty. Were they actual feathers or were they protofeathers?

Warrior Rapter
July 3rd, 2011, 04:43 AM
*GASP* Wait, re- oh yeah. That's right. Though I'm a bit rusty. Were they actual feathers or were they protofeathers?

I'm going to quote a previous post of mine in response to this.


I'll be honest here, there are some theories that paleontologists have come up with recently that I disagree with. Although the Brontosaurus -> Apatosaurus isn't one of them, I felt like that was kind of a cue.

The main ones I disagree with are how some think the Tyrannosaurus Rex was a scavenger instead of a predator, and how there's research being done about the Velociraptor having feathers. With the T-rex one, I'm sorry, I don't know what whoever thought of this theory was thinking. You don't get a creature THAT BIG living off of scraps, granted they were pretty big scraps, but still. The T-rex skull even has characteristics of a predator.

As for the Velociraptor theory, it's not so much the theory I disagree with, but how they try to portray it. Velociraptors were viscious pack hunters, we know that, we have fossil evidence of that. It stands to reason they would try to be stealthy on the hunt, in my opinion, because of that. I'm sorry, but having like three-inch long feathers sticking out like they have been ruffled does not seem stealthy. My picture of a Velociraptor is either the classic scales or if they did have feathers, something closer to the Vivosaur, V-Raptor, in the Fossil Fighters game.

@Tatsujin, I plan on it but, at the moment, money issues have kept me from going to college. That's why I'm still just aspiring. XD

DoctorSlavic
July 3rd, 2011, 06:07 AM
All right, so you also believe that this is a better portrayal of raptors, even though they're deinonychus?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q6invKdvLLI&feature=player_detailpage

Warrior Rapter
July 3rd, 2011, 06:12 AM
Yea, something like that. But I'm sure you can see where I'm coming from with that.

DoctorSlavic
July 3rd, 2011, 06:18 AM
Yeah, i see what you mean. Raptors were definitely wolf-like pack hunters (only better), and they did have feathers, but not like the ones we would see on a modern day swallow, because that would effect stealth. I do like the idea of protofeathers, because it gives them a sleek body to run around in. However, it is not entirely out of the question that they may have had more modern feathers, wvwn though it wouldn't make a whole lot of evolutionary sense.

Myles
July 3rd, 2011, 06:47 AM
As for the Velociraptor theory, it's not so much the theory I disagree with, but how they try to portray it. Velociraptors were viscious pack hunters, we know that, we have fossil evidence of that. It stands to reason they would try to be stealthy on the hunt, in my opinion, because of that. I'm sorry, but having like three-inch long feathers sticking out like they have been ruffled does not seem stealthy. My picture of a Velociraptor is either the classic scales or if they did have feathers, something closer to the Vivosaur, V-Raptor, in the Fossil Fighters game.

I can't really think of any living pack hunter that's known for their stealth. Birds are pretty much most closest evolutionary descendant of velociraptors, so I'd use an example of one of them but I can't think of any birds that hunt in err... flocks. So an example would be, hyenas. And I don't think velociraptors have even been proven to be pack hunters.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/cd/Velociraptor_dinoguy2.jpg/220px-Velociraptor_dinoguy2.jpg

Besides they look cooler with feathers. :P

Warrior Rapter
July 3rd, 2011, 07:11 AM
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/cd/Velociraptor_dinoguy2.jpg/220px-Velociraptor_dinoguy2.jpg


Speaking of one of the pictures that makes them look silly >.>

I'm sorry, that doesn't exactly say "Vicious Carnivore" to me.... it looks more like a mockery of one.

DoctorSlavic
July 3rd, 2011, 07:15 AM
They look cooler with protofeathers.

http://images4.wikia.nocookie.net/__cb20100921204547/primeval/images/thumb/9/98/Episode2.1_24.jpg/581px-Episode2.1_24.jpg
(This is a dromaeosaurus from Primeval, btw)

And also, well it has not been proven, it is widely accepted that dromaeosaurs, AKA raptors, were pack hunters. And what about, uhhh, ants? No, umm, sharks? Hmmm, well there's... LIONS! THEY STEALTHILY HUNT IN PACKS! That is all.

Cassino
July 3rd, 2011, 08:20 AM
I used to be obsessed with dinosaurs as a kid.
This.

Question for everyone: Whats your favorite dinosaurs of the following catagories?
Carnivore: Nanotyrannus lancensis, if it is indeed a seperate species from Tyrannosaurus rex. If not, there was a small insectivorous raptor from the Jurassic period, I think, that I took a liking to, but recalling the names of these things is not too easy.
Flying: Does Archeopteryx count?
Otherwise, I couldn't say, it's theropods and early birds that are where my interest lies.


Velociraptors are also one of my favorites, but did you know that their entire bodies were covered with feathers and they had wings? ;)
So far as I know, no actual feather fossils have been found.
I do agree with the position that they were feathered in some manner, though.

Raptors were definitely wolf-like pack hunters (only better),
A couple groups of raptors who died in the same place. That often occurs during floods, right? Maybe they happened into groups and hunted at times, but I don't think they were strictly pack carnivores like wolves are, more like... foxes, to draw a relatively poor analogy, sorry.

Asrossk
July 3rd, 2011, 09:04 AM
I'll be honest here, I'm not a Dinosaur expert in the slightest; this means my favourites will have to be based on my limited knowledge of them. To help me though, I enlisted one of my favourite childhood books that has an extensive Dinosaur bio selection that gives their appearance, size, and time they were around for. It's actually very nostalgic to read through this again. :3

I began turning the pages at a fast rate. I was going to deduct points from any Dinosaur that did not have a flame-thrower and/or a jet-pack. After realising no Dinosaur had either of those, I cried a little on the inside. This was going to be hard to choose.

Carnivore - Allosaurus, it's giant and looks tough. I think if you gave it a top hat and a monocle though it could become a very upstanding citizen in the community! I also love the name of it. This Dinosaur would not be great in espionage though, as it isn't exactly camouflaged for the job or very small. It's only hope of hiding would be pretending to be an exquisite paper maché display.

Herbivore - Pachycephalosaurus, because it doesn't look like it'll take anything from anyone. if I was a raptor I'd run away from that thing when it tried to headbutt me.

Flying - Dimorphodon, because it reminds me of a parrot. I would so have one as a pet.

Water-dwelling - Plesiosaurus, because it's gigantic and streamlined looking. Sort of like an alive submarine.

Spinosaurus
July 3rd, 2011, 09:21 AM
What's this? A dinosaur chat? Well, I say! This is my kind of chat!
My favorite dinosaur is really obvious, so no need telling. I also like Torvosaurus, Carcharodontosaurus, Utahraptor, Styracosaurus and THE COMPLETELY OVERRATED Tyrannosaurus Rex. <3
Any opinions on the 60 feet long prehistoric shark, the Megalodon?
http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_9py6IgNlFak/TEb417CSbpI/AAAAAAAAAg8/TjvJNMd5eY0/s1600/Megalodon.jpg
I think it's really interesting and I honestly want to know more about it. Though we don't really have much informations on it. :\

Myles
July 3rd, 2011, 03:22 PM
Speaking of one of the pictures that makes them look silly >.>

I'm sorry, that doesn't exactly say "Vicious Carnivore" to me.... it looks more like a mockery of one.

IDK, I guess I just like the idea of a monstrous man-eating bird.

So far as I know, no actual feather fossils have been found.
I do agree with the position that they were feathered in some manner, though..

They have:

"Finding quill knobs on velociraptor, though, means that it definitely had feathers. This is something we'd long suspected, but no one had been able to prove." ~Science Daily (http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/09/070920145402.htm)

Naruto Uzumaki
July 6th, 2011, 01:46 PM
I can't really think of any living pack hunter that's known for their stealth. Birds are pretty much most closest evolutionary descendant of velociraptors, so I'd use an example of one of them but I can't think of any birds that hunt in err... flocks. So an example would be, hyenas. And I don't think velociraptors have even been proven to be pack hunters.

Let me start off by saying there are many pack hunters today known for their stealth. Examples would be wolves, lions, African wild dogs and many more. Basically all of the known pack hunters or predators in general have to have stealth otherwise how are they going to catch any prey animals? But, you're right saying that there's no known birds that hunt in flocks. Not that I know of.

Birds are close, but reptiles are close as well. Seeing as scientists are saying that the closest living thing to a T-Rex is a chicken. So far the closest bird species that is the closest to the dinosaurs would have to be the Hoatzin ( since the chicks still do retain claws that their ancestors had.) and raptors.

And Velociraptors not proven pack hunters? That's the funniest thing I've heard. They've been found in 'dinosaur graveyards' in groups. Most of the specimens they've found were in at least pairs, and they would have been too small to be any real threat to Protoceratops or any other prey they've been known to eat. Most dromaeosaurids have been known to travel in groups, heck even T-Rex is beginning to be said to stay in small family groups. (Kinda off topic, but oh well.)

Sorry if it sounds a bit rude.

Myles
July 6th, 2011, 04:44 PM
I didn't mean to imply that birds never hunt in flocks, I said I couldn't think of any. Either way, there are pack hunters that don't use stealth.

As for the packs, you're thinking of dromaeosaurids in general, not Velociraptors.

Naruto Uzumaki
July 6th, 2011, 05:01 PM
I didn't mean to imply that birds never hunt in flocks, I said I couldn't think of any. Either way, there are pack hunters that don't use stealth.

As for the packs, you're thinking of dromaeosaurids in general, not Velociraptors.
Velociraptors did hunt in packs. That's what I stated earlier. And I've talked to a couple of paleontologists while volunteering at a museum.

And Velociraptors not proven pack hunters? That's the funniest thing I've heard. They've been found in 'dinosaur graveyards' in groups. Most of the specimens they've found were in at least pairs, and they would have been too small to be any real threat to Protoceratops or any other prey they've been known to eat. Most dromaeosaurids have been known to travel in groups, heck even T-Rex is beginning to be said to stay in small family groups. (Kinda off topic, but oh well.)

Warrior Rapter
July 6th, 2011, 09:08 PM
Going to catch up on this thread.

So far as I know, no actual feather fossils have been found.
I do agree with the position that they were feathered in some manner, though.

I'm not sure if it's what you would consider a fossil of a feather, but, in response to this, I feel the need to point to an Archeopteryx fossil that has been found. Note: the Pokemon Archen and Archeops were probably inspired by this dinosaur.

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_XrBnrpXNVuA/TKtSSGlH30I/AAAAAAAACco/o2S1XvRzgM0/s1600/archeopteryx++S.jpg




A couple groups of raptors who died in the same place. That often occurs during floods, right? Maybe they happened into groups and hunted at times, but I don't think they were strictly pack carnivores

Somebody correct me if I'm wrong on this, but I believe there's been fossils of two Velociraptors fighting each other before. This to me indicates that they were hostile toward each other, but then also point out the fossils of groups of Velociraptors attacking prey. The reason I say this is that if Velociraptors were violent against each other, the odds that they would team up against a prey would be slim, as, a natural instinct we can still see in some animals today, they would likely turn on each other for survival, means the others would be a bigger threat than their prey in this situation.

Now, combine that hostility, with the fact that they would team up indicates a sense of dominance with them, something similar that we would see with the alphas of a wolf pack. Do we know for sure that they were pack hunters? No, not really. But there is evidence that suggest they were likely to have been.

"Finding quill knobs on velociraptor, though, means that it definitely had feathers. This is something we'd long suspected, but no one had been able to prove." ~Science Daily (http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/09/070920145402.htm)

One thing a friend of mine got to talking about on this subject that I think raises a valid point: Given everything else we know about the Velociraptors, it could have been possible that the developed lighter bones to help them be more agile. Why would they be confused as quill knobs? There could be a couple of explanations: perhaps deposits of lighter material in their bones, or on their bones in this case, evaporated, decomposed, or just mildly collapsed. Perhaps they were making use of what we would consider a more modern design of aerodynamics in their bones for agility: a golf-ball dibbit pattern. I can refer to a Mythbuster's episode for my evidence on how that pattern could benefit aerodynamically. Just my thoughts on it anyway.

Myles
July 6th, 2011, 10:29 PM
Velociraptors did hunt in packs. That's what I stated earlier. And I've talked to a couple of paleontologists while volunteering at a museum.

It is widely believed they hunted in packs and they may well have; what I said was a simple note that they hadn't actually been proven to. Their close cousin, Deinonychus, has been found in packs, but not them. See this article (http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/blog/2011/mar/29/dinosaurs-behaviour-raptors-pack-hunters) for more details.

Naruto Uzumaki
July 7th, 2011, 05:42 AM
It is widely believed they hunted in packs and they may well have; what I said was a simple note that they hadn't actually been proven to. Their close cousin, Deinonychus, has been found in packs, but not them. See this article (http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/blog/2011/mar/29/dinosaurs-behaviour-raptors-pack-hunters) for more details.
Never seen that article. Well, that's a point I've got to consider now, but if the larger cousin of the velociraptor hunts in pack, wouldn't the smaller version also hunt in packs? Seeing as Deinonychus needs to be in packs to be a successful hunter, wouldn't Velociraptor need to do the same>

Warrior Rapter
July 7th, 2011, 05:51 AM
Going to quote my previous post for this.

Somebody correct me if I'm wrong on this, but I believe there's been fossils of two Velociraptors fighting each other before. This to me indicates that they were hostile toward each other, but then also point out the fossils of groups of Velociraptors attacking prey. The reason I say this is that if Velociraptors were violent against each other, the odds that they would team up against a prey would be slim, as, a natural instinct we can still see in some animals today, they would likely turn on each other for survival, means the others would be a bigger threat than their prey in this situation.

Now, combine that hostility, with the fact that they would team up indicates a sense of dominance with them, something similar that we would see with the alphas of a wolf pack. Do we know for sure that they were pack hunters? No, not really. But there is evidence that suggest they were likely to have been.

Cassino
July 8th, 2011, 05:09 PM
I'm not sure if it's what you would consider a fossil of a feather, but, in response to this, I feel the need to point to an Archeopteryx fossil that has been found. Note: the Pokemon Archen and Archeops were probably inspired by this dinosaur.
Sorry, I meant fossils of feathers on actual theropods (eg. velociraptor feathers), not something known to be a flying bird from the start.


Somebody correct me if I'm wrong on this, but I believe there's been fossils of two Velociraptors fighting each other before. This to me indicates that they were hostile toward each other, but then also point out the fossils of groups of Velociraptors attacking prey. The reason I say this is that if Velociraptors were violent against each other, the odds that they would team up against a prey would be slim, as, a natural instinct we can still see in some animals today, they would likely turn on each other for survival, means the others would be a bigger threat than their prey in this situation.

Now, combine that hostility, with the fact that they would team up indicates a sense of dominance with them, something similar that we would see with the alphas of a wolf pack. Do we know for sure that they were pack hunters? No, not really. But there is evidence that suggest they were likely to have been.
I see. That's a good point actually... It may be likely, it's just the main reason I somewhat-purport that they weren't is to put away the (IMHO rash) assumption that they 'definitely' were.


even T-Rex is beginning to be said to stay in small family groups.
Oh, I've heard of that, don't know what to think though. Anyone know what brought about the notion?

Naruto Uzumaki
July 8th, 2011, 05:40 PM
Oh, I've heard of that, don't know what to think though. Anyone know what brought about the notion?
They found a group of T-Rex fossils consisting of two adults and three juveniles (Or was it one adult and three juveniles?) so that's why they think they stayed in small family groups.

Warrior Rapter
July 8th, 2011, 10:25 PM
They found a group of T-Rex fossils consisting of two adults and three juveniles (Or was it one adult and three juveniles?) so that's why they think they stayed in small family groups.

Have they thought about maybe parental instincts? I might have to look into this myself but, if it's adults with juveniles, I think the basic parental instincts could still be a possibility. Even for a big predator like the T-Rex, I think it could make sense that they would've raised their young, kind of like how some predators would raise their young today.

Naruto Uzumaki
July 10th, 2011, 06:39 AM
Well, that's plausible, but after researching more, recently they found 68 Tarbosaurus fossils within close rang of each other. (Couple of meters) I'm pretty sure they hunted in packs now. And for those who think it might be coincidence, they also found other Tyranosaur species in groups. Such as Albertasaurus. 23 of them within a couple of meters of themselves. Anybody care to go against the theory of them not living in groups now?

Just in case anyone says this:

Even tho they died there all at the same place it might not mean that they were in packs. That's true. It could have been a feeding frenzy and they could have all died there then. Or it could have been a flash flood and they all could have died together. But, what's the probability of 68 or even 23 Tyranosuars coming together for a feeding frenzy? I don't think there would be enough food to support them all like that. Well, that brings up the flash flood theory, what are your chances of getting all the Tyranosaurs within a very large distance to come together in a flash flood like that? There would have to be other dinosuar remains, but there wasn't. So, the only plausible idea is that they lived in groups.

Anyone want to challenge?

Warrior Rapter
July 12th, 2011, 08:50 PM
Honestly, the more I think about it, I think its possible that most dinosaurs lived in packs. I mean let's face it, back when they were still alive, it wasn't exactly easy to, well, stay alive. A lone dino at the time was probably a dead one unless they were really defensive, big, or voracious, all of which we have seen on creatures that even still lived together, such as many of the Sauropodamorphs (in case your not fluent with the scientific, generally the long-necks that lived on land).

While thing have quieted down a bit for now, I have a question for everyone. I've been thinking about starting an Other Club for talking dino, and I'd like to know if you guys think it's a good idea.

Kotowari
July 14th, 2011, 09:20 AM
Ah, dinosaurs. <3 I used to obsessed with them back when I was a kid. Now it's less, but I'm still fascinated by them and their fantasy offspring, the Dragons.

My favourite dinosaur would probably be the Stegosaurus, as well as the Triceratops.
I'm also quite interested in the Iguanodon, because well, there were quite some found in the country where I live. And our Museum of natural sciences is quite proud of its Iguanodon of Bernissart fossils. Though, in the beginning they thought that Iguanodons walked on two legs, so while the skeletons were assembled to show in the museum, they were positioned as bipedal creatures. Paleontologists now believe that they prefered to walk on all 4 limbs, but they can't fix the skeletons anymore.
http://www.willgoto.com/images/Size3/Belgium_Iguanodon_in_Brussels_Museum_of_Natural_Sciences_e93b472876d14d3989a906d644de9067.jpg

I have yet to see them, (sad sad sad) but I really do want to go. As a geologist in spe, I just have to go right? Takling about my geology course, I was/am kind of disappointed that the paleontology course I get (both I and II) says so little about dinosaurs.
They make the difference between Pterosaurs and Dinosaurs [Ornithischians, Saurischians and some]. And that's about it.

What amuses me though, is that the birds evolved from the lizard-hipped Dinosaurs, and not the bird-hipped ones.
What also amuses me, is that despite it's status as one of the most popular/well-known dinosaurs, the T-Rex is so rare.

About the herd thing, I don't feel like thinking much, so I'm going to quote my paleontology book:

"Dinosaurs are found world wide, including from high latitudes, where it would have been dark in winter for several months. Even in the warm global conditions of the Mesozoic, this would have necessitated a warm-blooded habit. In addition, dinosaurs were active predators and herd-dwellers, and the predator:prey ratios of dinosaurs are consistent with endothermy. Evidence of long-term protection of the eggs and young, and complicated adaptations for display and communication, suggest that dinosaurs also evolved complicated social patterns in a wide variety of different environment."

Minishcap
July 14th, 2011, 09:44 AM
On another note, some scientists have suggested that several genus within the Triceratopsini tribe represent same genus but varying developing stages.
Triceratops horridus (type example for the Triceratops genus) would represents a juveline stage. The debatable Nedoceratops hatcheri would represent a young adult stage and Torosaurus latus as a full grown adult stage.

The suggestion is quite interesting, however it is not without challenge/criticism, though it does show a important aspect; that we have been very generous with classification of dinosaurs into several genus...the more the merrier I suppose...

Kotowari
July 15th, 2011, 03:56 AM
I wouldn't be surprised if it turned out to be that way. The fossil reccord is far from complete. Every (piece of) fossil tells a story, but not every story can be linked the big picture.

dinosaurodon
July 27th, 2011, 10:54 PM
Dinosaurs. Man, loved them so much. wanted to be a paleontologist like Alan Grant from Jurassic Park. That didn't go as planned. However I still like dinosaurs, my favorite would have to be Gaganotosaurus, one of the largest, if not largest carnivorous dinosaurs. It hunted in packs too, even if it was enormous.