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Went
July 8th, 2011, 10:23 AM
Rupert Murdoch acted with characteristic ruthlessness by closing the News of the World, Britain's best-selling Sunday newspaper, in a desperate attempt to limit the political and commercial fallout from the phone-hacking affair engulfing his media empire.

Murdoch's son James, who runs his UK titles, told the paper's 200 staff that Sunday's edition of the paper, which sells 2.6m copies a week, would be its last, ending the 168-year history of the title his father bought in 1969, a purchase that introduced him to the British public for the first time. The last News of the World will carry no commercial advertising.

"The good things the News of the World does … have been sullied by behaviour that was wrong. Indeed, if recent allegations are true, it was inhuman and has no place in our company," he said.

"The News of the World is in the business of holding others to account. But it failed when it came to itself."

There was immediate speculation last night that the paper will be replaced by a Sunday edition of the Sun which could be produced by staff at the daily. The domain names TheSunOnSunday.co.uk, TheSunOnSunday.com and SunOnSunday.co.uk were registered two days ago.

Readers and retailers had reacted with disgust to the revelation this week that journalists at the News of the World ordered the private investigator Glenn Mulcaire to hack into voicemail messages left on a mobile phone belonging to murdered teenager Milly Dowler in 2002, one of the most damaging in a series of reports by the Guardian on the hacking scandal over the last two years.

It also emerged that Mulcaire may have targeted the relatives of British servicemen killed in Afghanistan and Iraq and survivors of the 7/7 terrorist attacks on London. A reader boycott also seemed likely and one independent chain of newsagents said it would not stock the title.

Mark Lewis, the solicitor for Milly Dowler's family, said: "People are losing their jobs in order to sacrifice themselves to save the real perpetrators … lots of good individuals have lost their jobs or will lose their jobs and the people who should have fallen on their swords are still there."

Of Rupert Murdoch, who was filmed on a golf course during the crisis and refused to comment, Lewis added: "It's a bit like Nero fiddling while Rome was burning."

News International's chief executive, Rebekah Brooks, a former editor of the News of the World, was said to be in tears as news of the closure was announced. A News of the World employee who did not want to be named said Brooks had said she had offered to resign in the wake of Ed Miliband's call for her to be sacked, but that offer had been rejected. News International denies that claim.

Miliband said last night of the closure: "It's a big act but I don't think it solves the real issues. One of the people who's remaining in her job is the chief executive of News International who was the editor at the time of the hacking of Milly Dowler's phone."

Downing Street said last night: "What matters is that all wrongdoing is exposed and those responsible for these appalling acts are brought to justice."

Staff at the paper reacted with fury to the news, with one source claiming there was a "lynch mob mentality" at its London offices.

Colin Myler, the editor of the News of the World, said: "Whatever price this staff are paying for past misdeeds, nothing should diminish everything this great newspaper has achieved."

The newspaper was once Murdoch's flagship title although its stablemate, the Sun, is now more profitable, but it remained a totemic title around the world. In 1951 it sold 8.4m copies, the biggest ever circulation for any newspaper. Even now, only a handful of English-language newspapers can match its circulation.

The closure followed another day of high drama, during which more companies, including O2, the mobile phone company 3, Sainsbury's and Boots said they would not be placing adverts in the paper on Sunday. The News of the World takes about £660,000 in advertising income each weekend.

James Murdoch admitted to staff it was "a matter of serious regret" that he had authorised a six-figure payment to a phone-hacking victim several years ago, but blamed others at the company for his decision. "I now know that I did not have a complete picture when I did so," he said. "I acted on the advice of executives and lawyers."

A News of the World employee said staff suspected Murdoch had closed the title to ensure his £8bn bid to take full control of BSkyB goes through. Miliband has called for the deal to be blocked.

Labour MP Tom Watson, who has been highlighting the phone-hacking scandal at the paper for two years, said: "Rupert Murdoch did not close the News of the World. It is the revulsion of families up and down the land as to what they got up to. It was going to lose all its readers and it had no advertisers left. They had no choice."

Murdoch is renowned for risk-taking and for making bold moves swiftly. But the closure of the News of the World is one of the most shocking and unexpected decisions he has made since he moved his title secretly to Wapping in east London in a successful attempt to break the print unions. It is the first closure of a national newspaper in Britain since Today was shut down, also by Murdoch, in 1995.

Murdoch bought the News of the World 42 years ago after a protracted takeover battle with the late Robert Maxwell and immediately took it in a direction that many regarded as downmarket. It became the building block for his UK newspaper empire, which would in turn finance the expansion of News Corp into a global media conglomerate.

Source: http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/2011/jul/07/news-of-the-world-rupert-murdoch

Full coverage: http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/phone-hacking

As a journalist, I find absolutely disgusting that some people might resort to hacking other people's phones to get such information- I think News Corp. has some serious explaining to do.

Captain Fabio
July 8th, 2011, 10:31 AM
Oh no, what a shame that the most stupid newspaper has finished.
I hate that newspaper because it is just pointless trash for, I am sorry, idiots. Anyone who really reads it and doesn't take notice of papers like 'The Guardian' annoy me.

I am happy it has closed down and the hacking scandal is just as shocking, but doesn't surprise me from the type of reporters that work there.

Gold warehouse
July 8th, 2011, 10:42 AM
And nothing of value is lost.

"Following the News of the World phone hacking affair that led to the closure of News of the World on 10 July 2011, there is speculation that News International will launch a Sunday edition of The Sun to replace the News of the World."

It will be the same paper, with a different name. They will always sell because there will always be people who prefer gossip and cheap entertainment stories over actual news. But reporters for tabloids have been doing things like this since the 80s.

Boomburst
July 8th, 2011, 12:14 PM
I so saw this coming. Closing was pretty much the only way out of the hacking scandal, not to mention the hundreds of other controversies that the paper stirred up.

Esper
July 8th, 2011, 12:37 PM
I really dislike Rupert Murdoch and Newscorp. I wish more of their faux news outlets would crumble. What does it matter if this one is gone and The Sun still remains?

Went
July 11th, 2011, 02:01 PM
Oh, more info- apparently the "serious" The Times spied Gordon Brown's medical records, and illegally obtained his bank data (http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/2011/jul/11/phone-hacking-news-international-gordon-brown). The Sun also poked their nose there, but that's not that surprising.

Now the game is: guess how long until the BSkyB bid dies a painful death.

Livewire
July 11th, 2011, 02:05 PM
And evidently, this sort of illegal behavior was condoned and even propagated by top level members of this company - Executives, VP's etc. Murdoch should be ashamed of himself. Then again, the scandal here won't really effect the News company I'm hoping it will, (Fox, seeing as NewsCorp owns them) so meh.

Mr Cat Dog
July 11th, 2011, 03:33 PM
Is it mini-modding if I think this should be moved to C&M?

As much as my personal politics disagrees heavily with the outlook of the now deceased News of the World, it's still a shame that the paper had to close and put so many people out of a job. I obviously don't refer to the reporters accused of phone hacking in that assessment, who deserve criminal sanctions if the evidence shown so far proves to hold up in court, but to the innocent journalists... especially those in the non-news sections of the paper, like critics and columnists and stuff.

As well as this, it appears highly likely that some Murdoch-owned paper will fill the void eventually, whether it's the Sun on Sunday (whose domain name has already been registered by News International (http://www.theregister.co.uk/2011/07/11/sun_on_sunday_domain_name/)) or a new Sunday paper. This closure is definitely one of a more symbolic nature (and to protect Murdoch's interests in the BSkyB merger).

Drummershuff
July 12th, 2011, 02:29 AM
Oh no, what a shame that the most stupid newspaper has finished.
I hate that newspaper because it is just pointless trash for, I am sorry, idiots. Anyone who really reads it and doesn't take notice of papers like 'The Guardian' annoy me.

I am happy it has closed down and the hacking scandal is just as shocking, but doesn't surprise me from the type of reporters that work there.

With the amount of people that used to read it on a Sunday, over a million more than the second-ranked Sunday newspaper, I don't think you can actually say that it was the "most stupid newspaper". Personally, papers like 'Daily Star' I would consider are far worse.

The Guardian is satisfactory, but only has about 250,000 daily readers, whereas papers like the Daily Express have 600,000 which would poll better.

You also mentioned that you're not suprised about the hacking scandals because of the reporters that work there -- that is a rather harsh thing to say, given that most of the reporters currently working there as just as shocked as the rest of us.

I generally like any paper that is pro-Labour, but as that's currently really only the Daily Mirror and The Guardian...

Gold warehouse
July 12th, 2011, 12:40 PM
With the amount of people that used to read it on a Sunday, over a million more than the second-ranked Sunday newspaper, I don't think you can actually say that it was the "most stupid newspaper". Personally, papers like 'Daily Star' I would consider are far worse.

The Guardian is satisfactory, but only has about 250,000 daily readers, whereas papers like the Daily Express have 600,000 which would poll better.
I don't see how popularity affects quality.

You also mentioned that you're not suprised about the hacking scandals because of the reporters that work there -- that is a rather harsh thing to say, given that most of the reporters currently working there as just as shocked as the rest of us.No, not all the reporters are involved. But it really wouldn't surprise me if a good number of them were not shocked at all. If you became a reporter, would you want to be a part of the tabloid press? It's no secret that they do things like this, they've been invading on people's privacy and breaking data protection laws for decades.

I generally like any paper that is pro-Labour, but as that's currently really only the Daily Mirror and The Guardian...I don't think The Sun or News of the World have ever been pro-Labour. Not sure if you were implying that though.

Mr Cat Dog
July 12th, 2011, 12:47 PM
I don't think The Sun or News of the World have ever been pro-Labour. Not sure if you were implying that though.
News International was in love with Labour during the Blair era. Almost like a destructive marriage!

Captain Fabio
July 12th, 2011, 12:48 PM
With the amount of people that used to read it on a Sunday, over a million more than the second-ranked Sunday newspaper, I don't think you can actually say that it was the "most stupid newspaper". Personally, papers like 'Daily Star' I would consider are far worse.

The Guardian is satisfactory, but only has about 250,000 daily readers, whereas papers like the Daily Express have 600,000 which would poll better.

You also mentioned that you're not suprised about the hacking scandals because of the reporters that work there -- that is a rather harsh thing to say, given that most of the reporters currently working there as just as shocked as the rest of us.

I generally like any paper that is pro-Labour, but as that's currently really only the Daily Mirror and The Guardian...

Less people read the Guardian because it is more intelectual and can be considered harder to read. The News of The World is a very simple, blunt newspaper which is also cheap. The News of The World is, pretty much, a lads paper and applies to a lot of working class people. I know that sounds like I am discriminating against that bracket of people, but it is true; if you live in the UK you will know.

Maybe it is a harsh thing to say, but you think about the type of people that have to do that, then you look at the paper, it is pretty easy to see what type of mentality these reporters have.

The Daily Mirror is a shockingly bad paper as well, not as bad as the NotW but some of the articles reported and the way they are reported is just painful. But I digress, that isn't the topic of discussion.

Netto Azure
July 12th, 2011, 03:40 PM
I was surprised listening to NPR that Rupert Murdoch has so much political power in Britain compared to the US...and how he supported New Labor then switched to the Conservatives a while back.

Still either this scandal and practice stays in the UK or goes around the world is up for debate. :U

Bluerang1
July 12th, 2011, 03:42 PM
Yeah I really don't think it deserves to be closed. It's like a legend of a paper. People do far worse things... I don't know, I hope it stay or maybe it'll get re-branded. People will lose jobs :/

Livewire
July 13th, 2011, 06:50 AM
Yeah I really don't think it deserves to be closed. It's like a legend of a paper. People do far worse things... I don't know, I hope it stay or maybe it'll get re-branded. People will lose jobs :/

Sorry, but they hacked people's phones for information, thus throwing every single shred of journalistic integrity out the window. It's literally a cardinal rule. So, any sort of repercussions they get are well deserved.

Went
July 13th, 2011, 09:50 AM
Now the game is: guess how long until the BSkyB bid dies a painful death.

Barely over a day: News Corp gives up on BSkyB bid (http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/2011/jul/13/news-corp-pulls-out-of-bskyb-bid) They say they couldn't progress in this "climate"- specially when the Parliament was going to have a vote to ban him from even submitting the deal.

Is anything going to happen to The Times and The Sun now? They look like the most likely new victims.

Esper
July 13th, 2011, 10:10 AM
Over here in America we're starting to look into this mess. A US Senator (Jay Rockefeller, the chairman of the Senate commerce committee) is asking the government to investigate Newscorp to see if they've broken American laws since Murdoch is an American citizen and his corporation is also American.

I've read people saying this is going to be Murdoch's Watergate. By yesterday I heard that the corporation's value had already dropped by 15% and that it was using its own money to help keep it floating.

Netto Azure
July 19th, 2011, 10:13 AM
BBC News - Phone hacking: Murdoch attacked at MPs' hearing (http://bmgf.bulbagarden.net/redirect-to/?redirect=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.bbc.co.uk%2Fnews%2Fuk-politics-14209268)

MPs suspended their questioning of Rupert Murdoch for 15 minutes after a protester lunged towards him wielding a shaving foam pie.

The session had been going for two hours when the man rushed forward from the public gallery towards the News Corp chairman and chief executive.
He was fought off by a group of people including Mr Murdoch's wife Wendi, who was also in the public gallery.
The alleged perpetrator was identified on Twitter as Jonnie Marbles.
The man, who describes himself as an activist and comedian, wrote on the website just before the incident: "It is a far better thing that I do now than I have ever done before #splat."
The protester reportedly shouted "you naughty billionaire" as he approached Mr Murdoch - who was being questioned in a room in Portcullis House, a building adjacent to the Houses of Parliament where many MPs have their offices.
Seconds after the incident occurred, Tory MP John Whittingdale - who chairs the Commons media committee and was overseeing proceedings - suspended the session.
People were quickly ushered out of the room, the BBC's political editor Nick Robinson said, and reporters and members of the public were not re-admitted.


Damn that's amazing. Someone had guts.

Mr Cat Dog
July 19th, 2011, 11:25 AM
The best part was when Wendi completed smacked him in the face. I don't really support the Murdoch empire, but the way the camera was presented just added real comedy value to the whole proceedings!

Livewire
July 19th, 2011, 11:54 AM
MSNBC ran that story all morning long. It was hilarious. XD

Rumor has it that Murdoch may be replaced by Newscorps' COO, should the board vote to remove him.

-ty-
July 19th, 2011, 05:42 PM
I was actually watching the committee meeting when it happened live. Yeah it was just desserts! lol