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Harley Quinn
August 8th, 2011, 10:38 PM
My school is trying a system where students are freely allowed to use iPod's/mp3's/etc in class on the grounds of 'it will help the students to focus on their work'. I personally believe the school board is only trying this because of the constant pressure from students and teachers alike, students because they want to listen to music freely in class and teachers because they're sick of the complaints they get from students.
Now I don't know how this works around the world, so if this is a wasted topic, I'm sorry. Anyway, do you think iPod's should be used in class? If so, why? If not, why?

Anders
August 8th, 2011, 10:48 PM
In my school the rules are you can have electronics but once the first morning bell rings they have to go in your bag for the rest of the day. The rule is widely ignored by most teachers who's only comment is to hide them if anybody comes in.

My opinion, we should be able to use them as long as we don't blatantly ignore a teacher by listening during a lecture.

G.U.Y.
August 8th, 2011, 11:46 PM
I don't see a problem with using them if you're texting. Obviously calling people, playing games, or listening to music is a huge distraction. Texting can be but it's not that likely.

I think the rules should be that the teacher should enforce whatever rules involving electronics they feel are neccassary. Why can't we text, play games, listen to music, etc at lunch? Really? That's just stupid. What do they want me to do, take notes on how my corn is still frozen because the cafeteria ladies can't cook?

:/

countryemo
August 9th, 2011, 12:06 AM
Texting while working = Can text others for help. Though I dont really have any friends in same classes or their numbers.

^^What you cant do that stuff during lunch? We can. Haha.

Well I guess music can be allowed, with some rules like 1 headphone in, or none while teacher is talking or just because. And that its quite and your neighbors cant hear it.

Music can be a distraction sometimes I guess, though I can actually help you. More or less. -plugs in my mp3- ahh classical

Esper
August 9th, 2011, 08:56 AM
The ones who text and play games in class aren't going to learn as much as the others. If you need to have it to focus then you're someone who just has trouble focusing in general and it's going to be more of an uphill struggle for you to learn things in class. It reminds me of something I just learned last week, which is that, apparently, in France you learn math with a calculator. I ran into a kid who'd been able to do Calculus back in France, but when he got here to America he struggled to do multiplication by hand.

I mean, if you're super focused and smart it won't matter if you have an ipod or not, but since it would be unfair to let you have one and the struggling students not have one it would be better not to let anyone have one. I'm mostly talking about high school here. College is kind of a different matter since it's something you pay for and it's "extra" education. There, if you don't pay attention, it's your own loss. It's your own loss in high school, too, but everyone ought to get through high school and we should have rules to make sure as many people get as much from their education out of HS as possible.

Alli
August 9th, 2011, 05:36 PM
Oh yay, a topic I can use my ~teacher in the making~ perspective on. I don't think electronics of any sort should be used during class. It's a distraction. I mean, I know I wouldn't be able to focus on class if I was texting, listening to music, etc during lectures and work. Teachers can easily be tuned out when the student is playing games, listening to their iPod, etc. However, I don't think it would be a problem during non-academic times like lunch, break (I went to a high school that had a 15 minute break, like a snack time type thing), or during down time, like sitting in the gym during certain tests after you're finished and have left the testing areas. Or if you had a legit family issue that you needed to stay updated on, I don't see a problem in texting in class for that, as long as you bring a written excuse (ie. pregnant or sick family member). But basically, no electronics in class, but I don't see a big fuss over having them during non-academic things as mentioned.

Gold warehouse
August 9th, 2011, 05:43 PM
It probably shouldn't be allowed, but how many teachers actually enforce that rule? At my college, none of them do. I, for one, am perfectly capable of listening to music whilst working. So it suits me fine.

Most people go for texting rather than listening to music though. I think allowing iPods could work; if people are listening to music, it's less likely they'll chat to others which is way more distracting. imo, don't allow it whilst the teacher is talking, but once they're finished and everyone is just putting pens to paper I don't see why it would be a bad thing.

Bluerang1
August 9th, 2011, 05:49 PM
When working I guess so but no texting because of cheating. What I mean is when they're given assignments, they can listen to music and when done, play games.

Alli
August 9th, 2011, 07:07 PM
When working I guess so but no texting because of cheating. What I mean is when they're given assignments, they can listen to music and when done, play games.

No offense, but instead of doing that, why not work on homework for other classes? That's what I did in high school, and it's especially helpful if you're in an extracurricular activity that requires you stay after school, like marching band or theatre rehearsals. I mean, I guess that'd be up to the choice of the student, but I personally would rather have my students working on other homework so that they have more free time at home and over the weekend.

Kyoko
August 9th, 2011, 07:46 PM
The only time I see it being appropriate is in the mornings before class starts, at lunch, or in free period. People who text during class or listen to their ipods are ridiculously rude in my opinion. Your teacher has spent time preparing notes and lectures they think is important for you to learn, so you should have the same amount of respect for the teacher so their efforts are worth it. How would you feel if during a big presentation you were giving, you look out and see people tuning out to their phones or music?

I always thought it was rude. Some teachers allow it during free time at the end of the class period, but during? I don't like it.

-Jared-
August 10th, 2011, 09:27 AM
Oh yay, a topic I can use my ~teacher in the making~ perspective on. I don't think electronics of any sort should be used during class. It's a distraction. I mean, I know I wouldn't be able to focus on class if I was texting, listening to music, etc during lectures and work. Teachers can easily be tuned out when the student is playing games, listening to their iPod, etc. However, I don't think it would be a problem during non-academic times like lunch, break (I went to a high school that had a 15 minute break, like a snack time type thing), or during down time, like sitting in the gym during certain tests after you're finished and have left the testing areas. Or if you had a legit family issue that you needed to stay updated on, I don't see a problem in texting in class for that, as long as you bring a written excuse (ie. pregnant or sick family member). But basically, no electronics in class, but I don't see a big fuss over having them during non-academic things as mentioned.

Same opinion, and same perspective as well. 8D I remember in high school for me, many students would blatantly ignore the teacher while listening to iPods. For me, it's partially a respect issue, and partially a principle issue.

On the one hand, you have teachers who are in this profession not for themselves, but for the sake of the students, who try to teach skills and knowledge to give the students a better life, and the students respond by ignoring the teacher and listening to music? I personally find that very disrespectful.

And on the other hand, as a school, it is the job of the school and the teachers to make sure that students learn and focus on their schoolwork. If you allow them to use video games and iPods in class, they probably won't be able to focus as well, or use their time as wisely as they could without them. So the school should prevent the use of these items in class.

But I do agree that allowing them during break times would be acceptable, as it allows the students to relax in between classes, which could be beneficial, in a sense.

Just my two cents worth. ^__^

Guitarstar76
August 10th, 2011, 09:30 AM
Well in my school some teachers don't allow ipods and phones and stuff, but alot of them don't care at all, and let you listen to music. If your grade drops because of it then it's on you not them.

Saltare.
August 10th, 2011, 05:35 PM
If we're doing independent work, my teachers have let us listen to our iPods, as long as we weren't playing games and such.

Music helps me concentrate, so I always have my iPod on me. Always.

Mr. Waltzie
August 12th, 2011, 07:29 AM
Lucky school, 'cuz in my school, no electronic devices allowed. And not even cell-phone. Once we brought those forbidden items like electronic devices to school, the teachers or discipline teacher will have to take action for it, like... seizing it?

But I really do need music to concentrate on everything

Blue Nocturne
August 12th, 2011, 09:04 AM
My school supposedly had a very strict policy on electronics, but nearly no one payed any attention to it. Most of my teachers would let us listen to music during class, but most of them had two conditions:

- Not so loud the person next to you can hear... through both of the damn headphones!
- Hide them when a higher up poked their head in.

It definitely helps me concentrate, as long as I remember to put a playlist on so I don't have to wade through the mountains of crap on my iPod.

I Laugh at your Misfortune!
August 12th, 2011, 04:43 PM
It reminds me of something I just learned last week, which is that, apparently, in France you learn math with a calculator. I ran into a kid who'd been able to do Calculus back in France, but when he got here to America he struggled to do multiplication by hand.

Um, won't you need a calculator to do maths eventually, assuming you study it to a high enough level? Like, do american high schools not use calculators? Not trying to criticise or anything, this is just something I was totally unaware of.

Anyway, to stay on topic - I find it extremely hard to believe anyone who says inputting extra, irrelevant information in the form of music or texting or whatever will help them to learn. Sounds to me like a flimsy justification to not pay attention.

Phantom
August 12th, 2011, 05:50 PM
I had one teacher that allowed them, and it acutally helped on tests. We could listen to them during tests, provided we showed the teacher that there weren't answers on them somehow. It actually helped.

Chikara
August 13th, 2011, 03:20 AM
Well see, I can understand letting people listen to their iPod when they're actually WORKING. However, if there's a lecture going on, it's just plain rude and condescending to the instructor :/

And I mean I can understand why teachers would allow students to do it, but I know I wouldn't. That's something too easily taken advantage of.

Guy
August 13th, 2011, 03:42 AM
Um, won't you need a calculator to do maths eventually, assuming you study it to a high enough level? Like, do american high schools not use calculators? Not trying to criticise or anything, this is just something I was totally unaware of.

Anyway, to stay on topic - I find it extremely hard to believe anyone who says inputting extra, irrelevant information in the form of music or texting or whatever will help them to learn. Sounds to me like a flimsy justification to not pay attention.
Usually in elementary school they try to keep the use of a calculator to a very minimum. They rather the kids learn how to do math without depending on a calculator. Then there are some math teachers you'll have later in middle school and high school who prefer you do some of their work without a calculator if it's something simple enough that you wouldn't need it. However, as the work becomes more complex and you get into classes like Algebra, Geometry, Trigonometry, Calculus the use of a scientific calculator becomes very needed. At the same time though, you don't want to have to depend on a calculator if you can't do simple multiplication, division, addition, or subtraction problems in your head. Which is what I believe is what Scarf was going with her recent discovery and its relation to electronics becoming a distraction or dependency.

As for where I stand on the use of mobile devices or iPods in a classroom, I find it a distraction. Personally, I can listen to music and do work at the same time, however, when it comes to listening to music and paying attention to someone, then I'll easily lose focus on the person talking. Some people find it hard enough to do even the former of the two. So, from a teacher's point of view (if I were one) I would not have my students using their phones or iPods / MP3's, because I'd rather I know I have their attention on me and what I'm teaching rather than what they're friend's latest status update is or what song they want to play next. I have no issue with them playing music and I guess to an extent using their phones before and after school starts and even during lunch. Although, that opens up a new discussion: If kids were allowed to use their phones and iPods during free periods and lunch, would it hinder face-to-face socializing?

Went
August 13th, 2011, 04:22 AM
When I was in school, we all brought game boys and we used to play them during lunch- one kid would play and six kids would surround him and ask for a try at the game. So I don't see the issue on bringing electronics and using them in their free time- phones, specially, they can be really useful.

But, like Sydian, the purpose of classes is not being entertained, but learning. The same way you know you have to turn off your phone and you wouldn't think of listening to music when you go to the cinema, you shouldn't do that in class. Not even texting unless you have a really good excuse, either. You go to class to listen to your teacher and learn, if you start listening to music or writing messages for somebody else instead of listening to them, what's the point of even going to class? You can read the textbook and do homework, well, at home.

I mean, I'm really annoyed when my classmates start browsing on their computers instead of listening to the professor. Or listening to music. Or playing Super Mario World in an emulator. Or just talking with each other. We are in an University class. Asistence is voluntary, they are paying for the classes, and they just don't care. If one day I feel like that, I just skip class and go to the cafeteria, it's a million times more polite and respectful to the teacher and your classmates.

I guess that if adult people who pay can't even pay attention to what the teacher says and need to find an alternate source of entertainment somewhere, somehow, we should try and get the children to get used to it before it's too late for them.

LightOfTruth
August 22nd, 2011, 07:05 AM
If they don't take notice of the rules they should just be showed the door, Tutors shouldn't waste time on these who don't want to be there :)

Bluerang1
August 22nd, 2011, 11:54 AM
School I go to now, iPods are most definitely allowed, maybe even encouraged because it's "you can listen to music.." for when we're given tasks and stuff. Or have nothing to do like in Study Hall. I kinda feel left out, I could use my phone but I want a new one and I don't have a line so it's kinda pointless and what's the point listening to music 24/7? xD

So yes, iPods in class work in this case. It makes the kids know when they can use it so they don't sneakily use it without permission. It's actually a really good system, though I've only experienced it for four days.

twocows
August 22nd, 2011, 07:52 PM
How about some discipline? What ever happened to, you know, doing work in school? This crap is ridiculous. It's this pseudo new-age crap that basically says "kids want to goof off, maybe we should let them!" Yeah, if that's the case, let's just stop schooling altogether, it's not like they'd be missing out.

I say we reinstate corporal punishment. Kids should be listening in class. If they're not listening, they need a good smack to keep them listening, not a music player.

Yoshikko
August 23rd, 2011, 03:32 AM
My school has a strict policy about iPods or phones, or any electronic device in class, and I'd like to keep it that way. I fully agree with Twocows here, on that people should listen to the teacher and be quiet, and if they don't follow the rules, face consequences. This is not at all something of old times because I am only 17 years old myself and even I think this way. I actually wish that there would be more discipline in schools.

I have ADD, and that makes it even harder for me to concentrate. Besides the fact that people are always talking (a few certain people), if they can listen to music as well, it just gets out of hand. I hate it when people won't shut up and I can't follow what the teacher says, because I love learning and being in class, and I love discipline and iPods and phones and whatnot in class is just ridiculous.

cazzler
August 23rd, 2011, 04:08 AM
Well In my school, it depends on what teacher you have, they might not care if you listen to your Ipod, but most do care anyway. Well my opinion is that there shouldn't be Ipods in class, same with phones and the like. My school is a zoo lol, people screaming and talking everywhere, the teacher goes on like nothing is happening, but some just snap and scream throughout the whole class, lucky thats just 2 of 6 of my classes :P

PkMnTrainer Yellow
August 24th, 2011, 04:16 AM
The problem with this is that the type of music one listens to heavily effects whether it positively benefits them or genuinely distracts them.

For instance, music with words/singing is going to be very far on the negative scale in general, which just happens to be the music that everyone and their uncle listens to. >_>;

Instrumental music on the other hand is far more ideal for this sort of thing.

BlooMilk C.
August 24th, 2011, 10:39 PM
From my perspective, I don't think that iPods should be allowed in class. The main focus of school is learning, and it could be distracting, and you have to listen in class. I guess it's okay if you want to listen while doing classwork, but you should really be focused on learning. Maybe students could have a 15 minute break during the day to calm down a little bit when they can do what they want. During non-academic times, electronics should be allowed because it doesn't detract from academic time, but basically, as long as it doesn't distract students from learning, electronics should be allowed in non-lecture/class time.

Musician of Literature
September 6th, 2011, 04:24 PM
Ok, when I saw this, a powerful rage came over me. Why? This is BS.

students are freely allowed to use iPod's/mp3's/etc in class on the grounds of 'it will help the students to focus on their work'

Yeah, ok. Look, I know the students complain, but this is school, and people need to be able to focus on their academics. Not their music. I am an avid musician, but I am also a student and I hate the apathy many put in. I know what works because I am very high in my class, and I know it's definitely not listening to music in class. Look, the only thing students should be listening to in class is the teacher. I know a lot of kids don't want to be there, but I say that they just need to suck it up and get through it. If you don't have the discipline to last 45 minutes in class without listening to music, then you are NEVER going to make it in the real world. K? How does listening to music help one focus on their work? The human brain cannot multitask, so listening to the teacher and your music at the same time will never work. And I don't CARE about what the students think. People seriously need to put a lot more effort into school,

Alley Cat
September 6th, 2011, 04:35 PM
Yeah it should. I have problems focusing a lot because of the stupid pricks in my class who sit around and **** off the day. If I had my iPod, I put on my music, and it helps me block them out and concentrate. It doesn't even have to be classical, but it generally can't be anything too exciting that will distract me a lot :s.

Plus in the mile for P.E., it helps to keep me focused on my breathing, it's just one less thing that I have to worry about. I just let the music take over, focus on breathing in and out, and moving my legs. I'm done before I honestly even know it. The only time it is a hassle is if you don't have a clip or it keeps falling off into the dirt. But whatever.

Count
September 27th, 2011, 12:00 PM
Okay, one thing is for sure: having your earphones in blocks out distractions from other pupils, alright. But at least for me, and I can't be the only one, it doesn't work because I really focus all of my mind into the music. I'd focus on the lyrics and whatever. I can't really concentrate when listening to music. I do it while doing homework because it makes it more 'fun', but it doesn't help my concentrating on the work.

On the other hand, if it doesn't work for you you can decide not to listen to music of course. And if half the class is listening to music - though the volume shouldn't be bothering others - and the other half is not, they can concentrate better as well... hmm interesting.

Still I think it should not be introduced. I'm going to be a teacher myself and I think that even when pupils have time to do their work and there is nothing to explain or anything, it'd bother me because if there would be something that everyone had to know, they might not hear it. I'm against iPods and whatnot in class. I think =p

Awesome.
September 27th, 2011, 01:12 PM
I can't listen to two people talking to me at once, never mind listening to music and learning. And if others want to listen to them, then be my guest.

marz
September 27th, 2011, 01:35 PM
I think iPods should be allowed in class. Those who are smart will use their iPod Touches to do research on the topic the teacher is teaching, however that is probably more prominent in post-secondary education. If we're talking high school, I dunno if you'd really want to do any research on the topic at hand in English class today.

Listening to music should be allowed. If you want to distract yourself from your work, then that's your prerogative. I had a French teacher in high school who didn't give a crap what you did in his class, if you don't want to listen to him then you pay for it in your grade. That's a fine philosophy in my opinion. I would only be listening to music when we're working on our individual assignments in class or taking a test. But if the teacher is giving a lecture, I wouldn't. If you want to, I don't care. I may or may not be willing to help you if you've got a whole ton of questions due to your preoccupation in class. If you're my buddy then no problem but don't expect me to carry your ass through class when you're listening to Lady Gaga. :|

FreakyLocz14
September 28th, 2011, 12:02 AM
My old high school rule was: No electronics during class periods, even if you are not in the classroom. They were generous enough to allow us to use them during breaks and lunch.

My college rule: Varies by professor. Most see it as rude, but the most they can do to you is ask you to leave class for causing disruption and mark you as absent for that day. They can't confiscate the device like they could in high school.

MasterLink742
September 30th, 2011, 07:52 PM
Starting this year, my school started a new cell phone/iPod policy in which you are allowed to use it free during lunch, and (obviously) before and after school, and then, during the day, the teacher can decide their own policy.

For example:
My first hour class is Biology, in which we are supposed to put out phone on the corner of the desk, and we can use it when we are working, or when the teacher asks us to look up something. The only restriction is no games, and no texting.

Though, my seventh hour class is AP Psychology and we are not allowed to have our phones out at all.

Though I was reading something the other day, that said that texting is beneficial.
I don't want to link it because it can have some language in it. So I will quote a few statements
texting actually improves both your language skills and your ability to pay attention in class.

The data shows the correlation is direct: The better you are at texting, the better your reading and writing skills, even if you use that horrible textese shorthand.

Sounds counter-intuitive? Really think about it. The kids aren't texting instead of writing flowery essays about the state of modern democracy. They're texting instead of not writing at all. How many kids would ever willingly write a sentence if texting and email didn't exist? Heck, how many would write poetry? Thanks to texting, we have a whole new generation of writers, getting massive amounts of practice at forming thoughts into words -- and concise words, at that, thanks to character length restrictions.

And as for texting in class: It has its place too, provided it is used in moderation. Texting, being a quiet and fairly nondisruptive type of communication, has been found to improve the ability to concentrate. This is only in relation to other, more disruptive forms of communication such as the telephone, email and face-to-face conversations, though. Still, in the hectic environment of a crowded classroom, sometimes "They could be doing worse" is as good as it gets.

Lalapizzame
September 30th, 2011, 08:06 PM
Correlation is not causation.

Most texting is centered around sentimental messages or a casual environment that tends to radiate towards simpler vocabulary. One who becomes used to textspeak will find it hard to break that habit as an adult.

A lesser evil is still an evil. Just because something is better than the worst scenario does not mean it is beneficial, only relatively positive.

femtrooper
October 12th, 2011, 09:12 PM
As a university student, this does not apply to me, but as far as my opinion goes, I think iPods should be allowed in class during free working time. So while the teacher is lecturing, absolutely not, but if they allow you to listen to your iPod while you work on an assignment, sure! Why not? I listen to music all the time as I work. For some people it really helps, for others not, but the choice should be there. I do not think it should be used during learning time/lecturing time. That doesn't make any sense to me.

Zeroblivion
October 12th, 2011, 09:50 PM
Some of my classmates have phones, iPods, even they're charging iPods near sockets.
They hear to music every time in recess, breaktime and free times. But I had an iPod, instead an iPod Touch. I even play music if I'm in a rush to add more fun.
I can't live without music, they touch our feelings.

Symbonite
October 12th, 2011, 10:17 PM
The high school I attend is pretty lenient with the cell phones and iPods in class, and while we switch from class to class and including lunch periods. They allow the teachers to choose if they will allow them. I can see the benefits of having them while doing independent work, while during lectures and instructional time, they should be off an way. That's what my Chemistry teacher did last year, and it seemed to be quite effective. Music for most people helps them concentrate while still working on school work, I for one work best and more efficiently while listening to music. The only problem I see is when it escalates to a high volume where you can hear every word of what the song is saying, then it can be a distraction. From personal experience, in Spanish while doing independent work, we are allowed to use our cell phones and iPods to help assist us with our work. Such as using Word Reference and other sources. No iPods in class aren't absolutely necessary, but they help in one way, shape or form.

chella182
October 13th, 2011, 07:50 AM
I'm not sure if I agree with this. I mean if you're doing some sort of test in the class, I can see how listening to music on your iPod could help you concentrate (I know when I used to do revision I liked some music on) but then again, you could have "answers" or things that can help you with the test on there, so I can see why they're not allowed.

Maybe it would help some kids concentrate, but others would use it as an excuse not to listen. I know that's how it would've been in my school, anyway.

lx_theo
October 13th, 2011, 01:47 PM
My school allows free use of electronics anywhere before the morning bell, during your lunch period in the cafeteria, and anywhere after the last bell of the day

dozo
October 14th, 2011, 11:24 AM
By my senior year in high school, iPods and MP3 players had been outlawed, along with phones. A lot of students got really mad, but I didn't care. It's hard enough for me to concentrate on things as is without music or distracting technology, but I know it helps a lot for some people. I'm just not one of them.

FreakyLocz14
October 14th, 2011, 12:04 PM
The problem is that many the new iPods act like iPhones sans the phone calling ability. That includes the ability to text, surf the web, IM, etc.

Corvus of the Black Night
October 14th, 2011, 07:28 PM
So how does plugging in your iPod help you listen to a lecture again?

FreakyLocz14
October 14th, 2011, 08:05 PM
So how does plugging in your iPod help you listen to a lecture again?

The only legitimate use I can see is using a voice recording app to record a lecture.

littlebrother
October 14th, 2011, 08:35 PM
I could also understand it being used in a class that you're taking by your own choice, but if it's for classes that teach basic things, like English and math then I'd say nay, especially if it's in elementary and middle/primary and secondary schools.

Instead of just allowing them to listen to iPods or not, though, maybe the teachers should try to teach their material with a bit more energy. Otherwise they're just going to be competing with an already over-energized entertainment industry to get the attention of the kids they're teaching, or stop teaching altogether. I don't know, I'm not a teacher in one of those schools so I don't know what it's like.

Seeing as how it's hard for me to keep my attention on a certain task myself, I wish I could have learnt how to manage my focus level effectively. With so many distractions around me, I sometimes have trouble focusing on specific things to finish them completely.

Alli
October 14th, 2011, 08:43 PM
Anyone who is an education major of any kind or is already a teacher of some sorts can probably agree when I say that we don't go to school to get our education to go to our jobs and teach students that are just going to listen to iPods during class and not get anything out of it. Since I'm elementary ed, I don't think this will be a problem when I get in front of a classroom, however assuming it would be, I wouldn't be too happy that I've gone out of my way to take math courses that I do not need (and struggle immensely in), but am required to take to teach kids that aren't going to listen to me at all. My education is wasted, and they're not getting their own education. So we negate each other there and neither of us are benefiting. I'm not getting paid to let students listen to music in class, I'm getting paid to teach them.

Instead of just allowing them to listen to iPods or not, though, maybe the teachers should try to teach their material with a bit more energy. Otherwise they're just going to be competing with an already over-energized entertainment industry to get the attention of the kids they're teaching, or stop teaching altogether. I don't know, I'm not a teacher in one of those schools so I don't know what it's like.

Depends on where you are and what age group you're dealing with, though. In some areas, they just don't appreciate the teacher that works his/her butt off to make class something to enjoy. I hope I can achieve that when I get where I'm going, but I mean, it's not always as easy as it sounds. Try getting kids exciting about math. lol :( Even M&Ms didn't work on me.

Yuoaman
October 14th, 2011, 08:49 PM
The only time I ever listen to my iPod in class is during tests and the like - I can't stand listening to other people shift and breathe and cough when I'm stressed out, and music calms me. Otherwise, I pretty much leave the thing at home or turned off in my pocket.

Misheard Whisper
October 14th, 2011, 08:50 PM
I have my iPod in my pocket all day, and I usually listen to it at lunchtime. I use my laptop in classes though, and some of my teachers don't seem to mind if I just plug headphones in while I'm working. Especially my Spanish teacher, because I'm in a lower-level class that I've already taken the syllabus for (due to timetable constraints) and I've got my own work to be doing. What he teaches is, for the most part, irrelevant to me. And in Classics, the teacher just seems not to notice.

As to whether it helps, I think it does. I work better with music of some kind playing, and just putting the radio on in class is not an option, if only because there will always be arguments over what's playing.

littlebrother
October 14th, 2011, 08:56 PM
Depends on where you are and what age group you're dealing with, though. In some areas, they just don't appreciate the teacher that works his/her butt off to make class something to enjoy. I hope I can achieve that when I get where I'm going, but I mean, it's not always as easy as it sounds. Try getting kids exciting about math. lol :( Even M&Ms didn't work on me.
Yeah.. Like I said, I'm not a teacher, I've only had a little experience teaching other people. If anything, the whole class should know where to go if their grades start suffering and they don't know what to do. It could serve as good practice.

Dark Piplup
October 15th, 2011, 04:57 AM
Well music helps me concentrate (if its good music). But playing a game while working is more like just playing a game instead of doin both. You can't. And with ipods you could text someone for help on work. So if it's just listening to music I'd say that that is okay.

BraveVesperia
October 15th, 2011, 03:48 PM
In our school we could only use our phones or ipods during break times and for me it would break the concentration of students when the teacher is having lessons but I don't know if it would help during exams.

FreakyLocz14
October 16th, 2011, 11:42 AM
During exams? The ability of many portable media players to access the internet, and the tendency of a lot of school buildings to have free Wi-Fi access, and even some devices allowing them to access 3G/4G networks where there is no Wi-Fi, opens up new ways of cheating.

pokecole
October 16th, 2011, 03:49 PM
I'm not allowed to have music in class... Like eminem is gonna tell me the answers...

FreakyLocz14
October 17th, 2011, 04:56 PM
I'm not allowed to have music in class... Like eminem is gonna tell me the answers...

There have been cases of people listening to recordings of lectures to help them cheat during an exam. Desperate students will go to great lengths to cheat. If you give them an inch, they'll walk all over you.