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QuilavaKing
August 19th, 2011, 04:19 PM
Apparently this wasn't being developed to actually be used in combat, but for an art project... or something.

Either way, it's pretty wacky.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/44177462/ns/technology_and_science-innovation/t/bulletproof-human-skin-lives-name-sort/

Take a pinch of Spider-Man's webbing, add some human skin cells, and you just may end up with skin worthy of Superman. A Dutch team created a piece of "bulletproof" skin from special, U.S.-made spider silk and human skin cells and found that it indeed can repel bullets ̶ as long as they're not traveling too fast.

The special brand of spider silk came from genetically modified goats and worms at Utah State University in Logan. U.S. researchers have spent years harvesting the spider silk protein from the goat milk to try to make new types of super-strong fibers.This sounds cool, but to be frank, I'm more afraid of spiders than bullets, so no thanks. lol

Impo
August 19th, 2011, 04:31 PM
It would be cool.
But can it repel other stuff?
It'd be pretty weird to have it repel bullets but be ripped to shreds by a knife.

and this reminds me of the incredibles super suits so much.

Yoshikkko
August 19th, 2011, 05:50 PM
Hmmm it's a nice idea, and they did pretty well if it can actually repel a bullet at reduced speed, but I don't think it would work in real life, since bullets are anything but speed reduced irl. Also, like Impo said, it probably won't be able to stop a knife.

Gymnotide
August 19th, 2011, 05:54 PM
It would be cool.
But can it repel other stuff?
It'd be pretty weird to have it repel bullets but be ripped to shreds by a knife.

and this reminds me of the incredibles super suits so much.

More than likely, "bulletproof" means resistance to concussive force, not cutting edges. Bullets work by pelting the target and piercing due to the speed it approaches, whereas a knife works as a mechanical wedge that cleaves using its taper.

marz
August 19th, 2011, 08:38 PM
"As long as they're not travelling too fast."

Well, last I checked, bullets would be shot out of a gun...and those types tend to travel quite fast. I mean, maybe it can repel certain bullets but not others, that would be quite impressive. But if it can't repel a bullet that's being shot out of any gun, what's the point?

Let's say for argument's sake that it can, this could be really cool. But also very bad if used in the wrong ways. Only law enforcement, political figures and the like should be using this. But you just know it won't stay that way.

Cassino
August 23rd, 2011, 04:26 AM
This ultimately sounds like it could find use as a material to be used in making protective clothing like overalls and gloves.

As for the military applications everyone's heads will jump to: I read that most injuries to soldiers currently are from low-velocity (ie. slower than most bullets) fragmentation to unprotected areas. If this 'skin' is flexible enough, I assume it could be used to provide a semblance of protection to the arms, legs and faces of wearers.


It'd be pretty weird to have it repel bullets but be ripped to shreds by a knife.
Not really — actual ballistic vests are vulnerable to knives unless explicitly made to repell those as well.

QuilavaKing
August 23rd, 2011, 02:26 PM
They could just have jumpsuits made out of the stuff, that covers the entire body.

PkMnTrainer Yellow
August 24th, 2011, 04:12 AM
This wouldn't actually work as armor. A bullet does not need to pierce skin to do massive damage to one's internal organs.

Melody
August 24th, 2011, 06:57 AM
Perhaps, but if a material like this were used in tandem with Kevlar vests/padding and such, then you'd be alright. Kevlar DOES work pretty well, usually the worst you come away with is a glorious bruise when you take a hit in Kevlar. Also additions like porcelain, hard plastic or steel plates are an option to prevent internal damage with such vests.

Cassino
August 25th, 2011, 05:58 AM
This wouldn't actually work as armor. A bullet does not need to pierce skin to do massive damage to one's internal organs.
I think it's obvious enough that a material like this wouldn't be useful as armour on its own, but it's difficult to protect joints, especially shoulders, with anything inflexible without it being unduly complex and heavy. For those parts could be where a 'skin' like this comes in — keep the kevlar and hard inserts where it's practical to do so, but have soldiers wear suits of this underneath and you could find that less limbs need to be cut off the injured.

ashby
August 25th, 2011, 10:33 AM
It's cool, granted. But it said in the article it was able to stop a bullet at a reduced speed. It continued to say "But it fell short of surviving a shot at normal speed from a .22 caliber rifle, the benchmark for protection for a Type 1 bulletproof vest." I wouldn't want to wear that in combat until fully developed. It would have also been interesting to know how much it weighed and the cost. I imagine it wouldn't weigh much but the cost of producing one would be through the roof. One standard issue bulletproof vest is enough price wise.