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Bluerang1
August 20th, 2011, 07:57 PM
So what do you think about having to wear uniforms to school and not wearing uniforms to school? Primary/Elementary to Secondary/Middle to High School that is. Do you think that uniforms suppress freedom of expression or support equality? Does non-uniform promote superior and inferior feelings among students or does it give them the chance to express themselves? Discuss.

Having experienced both, the later only for three days so far, I have to say uniforms all the way! Even before starting a non-uniform school I knew that I'd always prefer having to wear a uniform to school. It's just so much easier and removes the insecurity of not wearing a particular brand that others are wearing. I'm looking at you A&F, Hollister and Aeropostale. And less laundry.

This topic hasn't been on for a while.

twocows
August 20th, 2011, 08:33 PM
Schools should have uniforms. While kids will still find other ways to be bullies, it eliminates a lot of the "fashion" crap.

-ty-
August 20th, 2011, 10:45 PM
Schools should have uniforms. While kids will still find other ways to be bullies, it eliminates a lot of the "fashion" crap.

I agree! So many kids are judged by clothes, and the ones that can't afford them are often ridiculed. Individuality could otherwise be referred to as the haves and the have-nots. But I do not think that schools should have strict policies about hair, makeup, color contacts, backpacks, or anything else that could be considered an accessory.

G.U.Y.
August 20th, 2011, 11:30 PM
I'm on the fence.

On one hand, clothing is a major way to express yourself, and individuality (especially for teenagers) can be very important. On the other, it can be a cause for great emotional pain for some people.

I went to a high school in 9th and 10th grade that had uniforms. Then I moved and went to one that didn't have uniforms.

In the one with uniforms, bullying for reasons such as weight, sexual orientation, race, height, hair, etc were much more common than in the school without uniforms. Almost as if that replaced the bullying due to clothing.

I honestly felt much more depressed being forced to wear the same thing. I felt like a robot, like I didn't even matter. But that's just me. :/

I dislike uniforms. Thankfully, my work allows for uniform customization (to a degree.) But me not liking them isn't a reason to be against them.

Yoshikko
August 21st, 2011, 08:00 AM
I agree with Landorus completely. While school uniforms do eliminate the bullying based on clothes or brands, that opens a lot of other options to bully someone. It's because people will always find something to pick on. When clothes is not an option, it becomes skin colour, sizes (big, thin, tall, short, anything), even the amount of money you have, and I think that's even more cruel.

I don't like the idea of uniforms. The idea behind is is to create equality, but actually, it creates a very judgemental environment. People who are left out will feel even worse, because when you're small, you can't understand why you are left out, you look the same like everyone else, right? Everyone wears the same, so why you? I was bullied very long and very badly in Elementary school, and I know exactly what it feels like. We didn't have uniforms, but bullies will always find something, no matter what.

Oryx
August 21st, 2011, 08:26 AM
I loooooved uniforms. Tbh, since I don't have a lot of money, I didn't have cute clothes to wear every day of the week. So the uniforms were just so easy and nice and I didn't have to worry about it whatsoever. I didn't personally see any bullying that seemed to replace clothing-related bullying though.

Uniforms still give you the option to express yourself through jewelry, hairstyle, accessories, and sometimes shoes depending on the uniform. We almost always modified our uniforms to suit our taste, at least hemming the skirt a bit (some more than others). There's also various "free-dress" days during the school year, which make for great incentives for the students, and in addition they're free for the school so they have more money for other things.

Melody
August 21st, 2011, 09:19 AM
I came from a Middle School which wore uniforms, and even my Freshman campus in High School required them. I really didn't mind them much. I personally think that so long as the dress code allows for free expressions of individuality that go beyond the uniform are allowed for then it should be just fine. You don't have to be all accessorized up...but you can have some.

As far as it goes, yes...this is true. People WILL pick on whatever they can, especially kids. But I wasn't really bullied as much when in a school uniform than I was without it. Besides, they completely eliminated brand tags from our school uniform, if you had a brand tag on yours it was forcibly removed or covered with tape. Of course I stopped tolerating the bullies and they quit anyway.

yasu
August 21st, 2011, 11:04 AM
I do not agree with anything being forced upon another person. School uniforms are just forcing children to conform and obey indoctrination, which is a terrible thing to do to such young people; uniforms should be gotten rid of.

it eliminates a lot of the "fashion" crapFashion is not crap. Just because you do not enjoy it doesn't mean everyone else does not.

Oryx
August 21st, 2011, 11:14 AM
Fashion is not crap. Just because you do not enjoy it doesn't mean everyone else does not.

You have a point here, but not in the way you intended I don't believe. I enjoy playing computer games but I don't think that should be a part of the curriculum in high school, it's not about enjoying things.

But the point you made me think of is in the job world in the future. This past week, I was listening to what you need to make a good impression on various companies. For ones such as Microsoft, all that matters to them is that you're good at what you do (at least as far as what they look for from my school). However, there are also many companies that want you to be fashionable at least to the point of looking neat and not out-of-date, because if hired you'd be working with people and would want to be able to look presentable. But that raises the question of whether or not fashion in high school/middle school helps you in that regard.

yasu
August 21st, 2011, 11:25 AM
You have a point here, but not in the way you intended I don't believe. I enjoy playing computer games but I don't think that should be a part of the curriculum in high school, it's not about enjoying things.
And that is the sad thing, that enjoyment is not the priority. You are ONLY there to learn no matter how boring and soul crushing you find the experience. You don't live to enjoy yourself, you live to learn what adults tell you and then work your butt off for a society that doesn't care about you.

But who says you can not enjoy yourself whilst at school as well? wearing a school uniform doesn't do anything to help you learn, same as wearing clothes you chose doesn't prevent you from learning.

Oryx
August 21st, 2011, 12:11 PM
And that is the sad thing, that enjoyment is not the priority. You are ONLY there to learn no matter how boring and soul crushing you find the experience. You don't live to enjoy yourself, you live to learn what adults tell you and then work your butt off for a society that doesn't care about you.

But who says you can not enjoy yourself whilst at school as well? wearing a school uniform doesn't do anything to help you learn, same as wearing clothes you chose doesn't prevent you from learning.

In my high school, they've seen a noticeable difference in the attitude of students while in uniform as opposed to out of uniform. Wearing a uniform is similar to finding a study place for school; a uniform signifies to you "when I'm wearing this, I'm going to school to learn". That makes your mind go more into learning mode. If you wear that uniform often outside of school, then it defeats the purpose, but generally people don't. Uniforms put you in the mindset of "okay, school time now", the same way studying in a certain spot puts you in the mindset of "okay, study time now". It's a very similar concept.

So yes, wearing clothes you choose has been shown in my personal experience to make learning more difficult than if you're wearing a uniform.

razzbat
August 22nd, 2011, 04:44 AM
In my high school, they've seen a noticeable difference in the attitude of students while in uniform as opposed to out of uniform. Wearing a uniform is similar to finding a study place for school; a uniform signifies to you "when I'm wearing this, I'm going to school to learn". That makes your mind go more into learning mode. If you wear that uniform often outside of school, then it defeats the purpose, but generally people don't. Uniforms put you in the mindset of "okay, school time now", the same way studying in a certain spot puts you in the mindset of "okay, study time now". It's a very similar concept.

So yes, wearing clothes you choose has been shown in my personal experience to make learning more difficult than if you're wearing a uniform.
i can see that happening. my high school which i have been at since year 7 doesn't have a uniform and no one ever really gets picked. i'm pretty povo to the point i save lunch money to get games so i don't spend much money on clothes but people don't respect me for looking messy.
i went to high school in japan for a couple of weeks and thought that the uniform was pretty cool, kinda like all those anime, and through that i could see that yeh it would put you into a more of a study mode.
so yeh i see i don't really mind too much, but man some uniforms i see around when i go to the city are just awful, too much maroon :\

Sodom
August 22nd, 2011, 05:26 AM
I'm definitely in the pro-uniform camp. I think it's incredibly important for a harmonious high school appearance that everyone at least appears equal, and nobody is given any unnecessary reasons to feel like they are better than anybody else. It's fantastic for students to be able to express themselves, but they can do this in other ways - through their personalities, or writing or artwork - or even in their clothing in non-school hours.

In my experience, people tend to find a way to put their own stamp on the uniform regardless, through accessorising or shortening their skirts or wearing a jacket they're not supposed to wear... so their "personality" manages to shine through regardless lol

Freedom Fighter N
August 22nd, 2011, 06:28 AM
Fashion is not crap. Just because you do not enjoy it doesn't mean everyone else does not.

On topic.. I don't like school uniform. I like wearing what I want. But as a guy what I want to wear is basically the first thing I pull out from the close, so..
Also, bullying.. I have no idea where you got that from. Bullying wouldn't happen in parents knew how to properly educate their children, and if it happens, just report it and unless you go to a stupid school (if you are, transfer immediately.) it should be taken care of. Besides, even if you do have a school with uniform, that's just the infinite reasons for bullying - 1 = You achieved absolutely nothing.

As for the people who say equality.. not sure what high class students are doing in a mixed school (don't they have some fancy private school to attend) but even if they do, someone... Let's say a high class girl because girls love accessories. A high class girl can still come with a gold, shining necklace. A nice, stylized armlet. A ring with a beautiful ruby, sapphire, emerald, or any other of those fancy stones on it. A hairpin, probably more than one. And now we have a girl coming from a family that has less fortune.. And that's not just accessories. It can be accessories or cell phones and up to pencils and erasers. So ultimately, nothing is done here as well.
If people were actually smart with all this "equality".. then why stop at uniforms? Why not supply all students with the needed stuff to be in school? That's a lot more equal than just uniform.


In my high school, they've seen a noticeable difference in the attitude of students while in uniform as opposed to out of uniform. Wearing a uniform is similar to finding a study place for school; a uniform signifies to you "when I'm wearing this, I'm going to school to learn". That makes your mind go more into learning mode. If you wear that uniform often outside of school, then it defeats the purpose, but generally people don't. Uniforms put you in the mindset of "okay, school time now", the same way studying in a certain spot puts you in the mindset of "okay, study time now". It's a very similar concept.
Seriously, why would you need a school uniform in order to assimilate whatever's taught in class?

Zet
August 24th, 2011, 04:26 AM
School uniforms are great, it also prevents someone outside the school from coming in to stab someone(this actually happened one time when the high school I went to didn't make the students wear the uniform for some charity thing or something. I don't know it happened before I went there).

PkMnTrainer Yellow
August 24th, 2011, 04:32 AM
So what do you think about having to wear uniforms to school and not wearing uniforms to school? Primary/Elementary to Secondary/Middle to High School that is. Do you think that uniforms suppress freedom of expression or support equality? Does non-uniform promote superior and inferior feelings among students or does it give them the chance to express themselves? Discuss

Uniforms definitely support equality very literally. They also suppress one's freedom very clearly.

Being able to dress oneself does both promote superior and inferior feelings among students and gives them the chance to express themselves.

They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety.

My thoughts should be clear. Equality can take a hike.

In other news, trying to prevent bullying as a thing altogether is a hopeless cause. I think we should be focusing on helping children get through it instead. At least if we don't take away fashion, what someone's being bullied about can be changed or controlled with not all that much serious effort. I'd much rather be bullied about a choice of clothes or hair than something I cannot change such as height or complexion.

Elite Overlord LeSabre™
August 24th, 2011, 05:09 AM
As long as they're comfortable and not itchy or tight-fitting, I'd be fine with uniforms. It saves me the effort of trying to figure out what to wear every day. And anime has taught me that school uniforms are awesome.

There just better be a "shorts" variant for the summer periods because even when part of a uniform, shorts are comfy and easy to wear :P

I really don't know about equality... back in school I never could distinguish between different socioeconomic classes based solely on clothing... but maybe that's just me being horrible at recognizing fancy name brand clothes.

Bullies will always find something else to harass other students about. Uniforms would only remove one bully trigger, there are still plenty of others.

twocows
August 24th, 2011, 08:15 AM
Fashion is not crap. Just because you do not enjoy it doesn't mean everyone else does not.
Bullying people because their shirt doesn't have a logo is not fashion, which is why I put the word in quotes. And even if it was, it's not a legitimate reason to bully people. Plus, there's no place for it in schools, which should be educational environments, not a place to show off your clothing and make fun of others'.

Oryx
August 25th, 2011, 05:59 AM
Also, bullying.. I have no idea where you got that from. Bullying wouldn't happen in parents knew how to properly educate their children, and if it happens, just report it and unless you go to a stupid school (if you are, transfer immediately.) it should be taken care of. Besides, even if you do have a school with uniform, that's just the infinite reasons for bullying - 1 = You achieved absolutely nothing.

>implying that it's easy to transfer schools

At least in the US, you're only allowed to go to a different public school if you live in that district, and otherwise have to pay thousands of dollars a year for private school, which is often not an option for underprivileged families.

You're also making the assumption that if a uniform is required, somehow that makes parents less likely to educate their kids. They're not mutually exclusive; a school can have uniforms while the parents are being educated on how to not raise their kids to become bullies.

Seriously, why would you need a school uniform in order to assimilate whatever's taught in class?

I'm speaking from my own experience. I've been to 9 different schools in my life, 6 without uniforms and 3 with uniforms, so I have a large amount of experience on the matter, more so than the average person. I have experienced firsthand the same group of people both in a uniform and not in a uniform, and seen the different ways they act. In every case, the same group of people with uniforms was more attentive in class, more prepared to learn, etc.

You must have ignored my analogy as well, which is a shame because it was a very good one. I'll repeat it with more explanation for you...when you study at the same place that you hang out with friends, play games, and stuff like that, you're not as focused on school work. That's one reason why studying at the library is so effective - if you go there time and again to study, then when you arrive there, you brain recognizes it as "this is where I study", and pushes back other concerns in favor of studying. That's why having a designated study spot works so well.

Uniforms are the same idea. Students do not wear uniforms outside of school, for the most part (there are of course a few exceptions to every rule). Therefore, when they put on a uniform, they're telling their brain "it's time to go to 7 classes and learn things and pay attention". It's the exact same thing - it puts you into a studying mode that you normally wouldn't have been in, if you had been wearing everyday clothes.

I'd much rather be bullied about a choice of clothes or hair than something I cannot change such as height or complexion.

You're lucky that you have the option to buy a whole new wardrobe if you're being bullied over it. Some students are not quite so lucky that they have that kind of monetary freedom.

Zeph.
August 25th, 2011, 07:18 AM
In the UK uniforms are compulsory - we have to wear them in Primary (the first 7 years), and again in Secondary/High School (the next 6) So you basically need to wear a uniform to school, from the age of 5 right through to 18 (roughly)

I'm going by the Scottish education system here, but it's not that much different from the rest of Britain.

So yea, uniforms are fine. Even with them, people still find a way to show a degree of individualism with accessories and whatnot.

Freedom Fighter N
August 25th, 2011, 09:09 AM
[FONT="Calibri"][SIZE="2"]

>implying that it's easy to transfer schools


Of course not. I didn't even hint at that. But do you have a better solution? Offtopic, yeah, but I'm quite curious.

At least in the US, you're only allowed to go to a different public school if you live in that district, and otherwise have to pay thousands of dollars a year for private school, which is often not an option for underprivileged families.

You're also making the assumption that if a uniform is required, somehow that makes parents less likely to educate their kids. They're not mutually exclusive; a school can have uniforms while the parents are being educated on how to not raise their kids to become bullies.

Well.. to tell the truth, the best I can come to is an educational reform.

I also wonder how you reached the conclusion that if there is uniform > parents are less likely to to educate their kids properly? I said it about bullying.

I'm speaking from my own experience. I've been to 9 different schools in my life, 6 without uniforms and 3 with uniforms, so I have a large amount of experience on the matter, more so than the average person. I have experienced firsthand the same group of people both in a uniform and not in a uniform, and seen the different ways they act. In every case, the same group of people with uniforms was more attentive in class, more prepared to learn, etc.

That's.. if that was a research I would have said that is quite an interesting result. But it's too black and white to be one. But there's not enough information to me to be able to conclude that school uniform has a negative or positive effect on the student. I can say that schools with the uniform just as you explained had more discipline than the schools without them. But I don't have experience, so I can't say. I can just say what I think is the cause.

You must have ignored my analogy as well, which is a shame because it was a very good one. I'll repeat it with more explanation for you...when you study at the same place that you hang out with friends, play games, and stuff like that, you're not as focused on school work. That's one reason why studying at the library is so effective - if you go there time and again to study, then when you arrive there, you brain recognizes it as "this is where I study", and pushes back other concerns in favor of studying. That's why having a designated study spot works so well.

Uniforms are the same idea. Students do not wear uniforms outside of school, for the most part (there are of course a few exceptions to every rule). Therefore, when they put on a uniform, they're telling their brain "it's time to go to 7 classes and learn things and pay attention". It's the exact same thing - it puts you into a studying mode that you normally wouldn't have been in, if you had been wearing everyday clothes.

There was a part deleted by livewire.
Anyway, I did not ignore it. I just think it's not.. I can't find an appropriate word that describes how I feel about it. But I can say that I have a feeling that your conclusion from the previous paragraph has something to do with this. To be completely honest, I don't think a school uniform has an effect like that.. well I've said it before. Besides, kids with their own clothes can still do it. As I've said, it's more discipline. Good discipline, student awareness, and parental cooperation are probably the recipe for good results. School uniform? It can be an extra; not something that will give your scores a significant boost.

yasu
August 26th, 2011, 06:26 AM
Bullying people because their shirt doesn't have a logo is not fashion, which is why I put the word in quotes. And even if it was, it's not a legitimate reason to bully people. Plus, there's no place for it in schools, which should be educational environments, not a place to show off your clothing and make fun of others'.
Sounds like "there's one kid stealing marbles, so now everyone is banned from having them." Like it's already been said, kids will find anything to pick people out.

My last school doesn't have a uniform and it was actually better than schools I've been to with uniforms. I don't attribute the quality of the school to what clothes they're wearing though.

twocows
August 26th, 2011, 06:29 AM
Sounds like "there's one kid stealing marbles, so now everyone is banned from having them." Like it's already been said, kids will find anything to pick people out.

My last school doesn't have a uniform and it was actually better than schools I've been to with uniforms. I don't attribute the quality of the school to what clothes they're wearing though.
It's more like 20% of the kids are stealing 100% of the marbles and throwing them at the other 80% in an endless barrage of marbledom. Sure, if you ban marbles, they might start throwing used food scraps, but it hurts a bit less to be hit with a banana peel than a marble.

I think I may have taken that analogy a bit too far.

Livewire
August 26th, 2011, 07:06 AM
The problem here is that it's given too much thought and wildly blown out of proportion. Do you guys honestly believe that this happens? That if you don't wear Abercrombie & Fitch you get pushed into a locker by some jock? Let's turn off the Disney Channel. This is the stupidest, most overblown argument I've ever seen. Schools educate, nothing more. Uniforms are something practical, yes, but the effect it has on how well you do in school in nonexistant. Having a uniform won't make you study harder.

tleit004
August 26th, 2011, 07:19 AM
i think there shouldnt be uniforms because for one im alergic to cotton and whool cloth.2 because it takes away your right to express yourself(for those in america)

Charliezard
August 26th, 2011, 07:22 AM
School uniforms... Expensive, uncomfortable jackets. Well, that's really my only problem xD I'm all for uniforms but they should be made to be as comfortable as possible (Tracksuit pants, loose shirt and a jumper in the school colours with a logo?) and affordable.

Oryx
August 26th, 2011, 07:33 AM
Of course not. I didn't even hint at that. But do you have a better solution? Offtopic, yeah, but I'm quite curious.

Well.. to tell the truth, the best I can come to is an educational reform.

I also wonder how you reached the conclusion that if there is uniform > parents are less likely to to educate their kids properly? I said it about bullying.

The point I was making with that is what you said was "if you're bullied, go to the school. If the school does nothing, then transfer because it's a stupid school" as if it's really that easy.

There are solutions to schools that don't deal with bullying, actually. Schools get pressured by the overarching district, or in my case the diocese since I went to Catholic school for the last 3 years of my education. So if there's a problem with the school dealing with it, the next logical step is to go above their heads to the district, or the state, or if the problem is still not resolved the news because they always love a good "school not doing its job" story.

And the point I was making with that uniform/parents education is that the way you said it implied that they were mutually exclusive - the parents can educate their kids or uniforms can be implemented, but not both. What I'm saying is that they're not mutually exclusive, and that there's no test to be a parent so unless there's some sweeping reform in the next generation, uniforms do help.

That's.. if that was a research I would have said that is quite an interesting result. But it's too black and white to be one. But there's not enough information to me to be able to conclude that school uniform has a negative or positive effect on the student. I can say that schools with the uniform just as you explained had more discipline than the schools without them. But I don't have experience, so I can't say. I can just say what I think is the cause.

If you don't have experience and I do, then my opinion is much more educated than yours, no? I think the difference here between people that don't like uniforms and people that do are the purposes of school. To me, school is for education. Hanging out with people and such is secondary to the purpose of educating students for the next stages in life, and everything that can give them that edge to their education is worth it to me. But to the people arguing the other side, it seems that the claim is that school and classes are also about being social with your friends, hanging out, generally being a kid. Call me a serious student, but in my opinion hanging out can be done outside of class, or in clubs after school, but not during class time when education is so important to our future.

There was a part deleted by livewire.
Anyway, I did not ignore it. I just think it's not.. I can't find an appropriate word that describes how I feel about it. But I can say that I have a feeling that your conclusion from the previous paragraph has something to do with this. To be completely honest, I don't think a school uniform has an effect like that.. well I've said it before. Besides, kids with their own clothes can still do it. As I've said, it's more discipline. Good discipline, student awareness, and parental cooperation are probably the recipe for good results. School uniform? It can be an extra; not something that will give your scores a significant boost.

Actually, my opinion on that is from many study techniques taught to me in the past month or so to optimize my education at my college. I was encouraged multiple times by both experienced professors who know what their students do to study, and new TAs that are also in classes themselves and know what they do to study, to find a good study spot where I do nothing but study for that exact reason.

If you can find a way to discipline students to take school seriously without doing something similar to uniforms, I'd be happy to hear your plans. Honestly, yes, that is the ideal solution, students focusing in school with their own discipline with no need for uniforms. But this is not an ideal world, so ideal solutions aren't always feasible.

Esper
August 26th, 2011, 09:21 AM
I think Toujours had it right that uniforms are there to remind you that you're at school for school, that it helps reinforce the idea that you're doing something different, something that's kind of separate from your own personal life. Just ask yourself if you think you'd pay as much attention if you could take all your classes by video from the comfort and distractions of your own room. I imagine uniforms as one of the points on the sliding scale of freedom/individuality/expression. If you're in school you're already forced to do a hundred and one things that you might not do otherwise so what's a uniform on top of that? Maybe one step more on the scale. If you're free to express yourself in other ways (as in you're not at a school that forbids makeup, or holding hands, or something like that) then it's not really all that big a deal. Certainly not something to cry "BUT MY FREEDOM!" over. Some can take the uniform idea and turn it into an ends instead of a means and that's missing the point and causing more problems than it's solving, but it's not something that makes wearing a uniform bad.

Of course I can only speculate from an outsider's position since I never went to a school that had uniforms outside of PE class. As a side note I do want to point out that uniforms can be something you take pride in, something that you would want to wear because it shows that you take school seriously or something along those lines. I know from my time in Japan that plenty of junior high and high school kids chose to wear their uniforms on the weekend for these and other reasons.

DowntownDumpling
August 27th, 2011, 06:36 AM
I agree with Landorus completely. While school uniforms do eliminate the bullying based on clothes or brands, that opens a lot of other options to bully someone. It's because people will always find something to pick on. When clothes is not an option, it becomes skin colour, sizes (big, thin, tall, short, anything), even the amount of money you have, and I think that's even more cruel.

I don't like the idea of uniforms. The idea behind is is to create equality, but actually, it creates a very judgemental environment. People who are left out will feel even worse, because when you're small, you can't understand why you are left out, you look the same like everyone else, right? Everyone wears the same, so why you? I was bullied very long and very badly in Elementary school, and I know exactly what it feels like. We didn't have uniforms, but bullies will always find something, no matter what.

I agree as well. Thanks, Landorus.

Elechitman
August 27th, 2011, 06:00 PM
I think uniforms take away your individuality and who you are. I would rather be made fun of everyday of my life wearing my clothes the way I want, then to have to wear the same uniform as everyone else. Your clothes are part of your personality in a sense. For those of you saying you like them because they make people not make fun of you that's stupid. You should be happy people make fun of you for not being everyone else :D.

GreasyBacon
August 27th, 2011, 09:28 PM
I'm not brave enough to be an individual, so I'm all for equality. I do admire the idea of expressing yourself though. This topic is always debated and it never really has a winning answer. Societies like the American society has the best of both worlds. They're are individuals who are all about themselves, self-expression, etc.. Then they're are those who like the feeling of belonging somewhere. In some societies, one or the other is frowned upon. For example in some eastern cultures, like the Japanese, being in individual is frowned upon. It's always "We Japanese vs. Everyone else. Anyone else will bring shame and be ostracized. I, though, like to belong somewhere.

22sa
September 4th, 2011, 04:56 PM
Why Japanese school uniforms look great

Funny thing is a uniform has better quality than most of what's on sale.

I would've enjoyed a uniform

aruchan
September 5th, 2011, 07:47 PM
I'm all for school uniforms. It's pretty ridiculous how expensive and flashy school clothes are now. Girls wear really short shorts, which makes them look more like sleazy adults than actual students. At least if we all wore uniforms, fashion would be stagnant, and people of poorer taste or socioeconomic standing wouldn't be so ground into dust.