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View Full Version : The Internet: Packaged


marz
September 7th, 2011, 01:47 PM
Right now, if you open up your browser, assuming you haven't got any parental controls activated, you can visit any website you want. Any website is available to you so long as you can type its name in the address bar. This freedom is taken for granted.

What if we had that taken away? What if, now, you had to buy websites just like channels. Gotta buy em in packages. What are your interests? Social Networking, Business, Blogging, Photography? We'll give you a bundle of websites you can visit and you can even pick and choose up to 5 websites you'd want to be able to visit within that genre!

Regulation of the Internet is the future. What do you think of it?

Shiny Celebi
September 7th, 2011, 01:56 PM
I dont think anyone has a right to tell anyone they cant visit the sites they want unless it had something illegal such as child pornography on it. I think that kind of regulation( forcing people to buy websites in packages is wrong and takes alot of freedom away from people. Most people including myself visit alot of websites, they should only have to pay for the internet service, not use of the sites themselves, that should remain free.

Gold warehouse
September 7th, 2011, 02:00 PM
If the internet ever required EXTRA money I would instantly stop using it, it's as simple as that. I'd spend my days reading angry books instead. We already pay money to our ISP it seems absurd to purchase access to websites on top of that.

Although I am sure if this ever happened, those hacking nerds out there would find a way to bypass it. Technology can never be fully regulated, there's always someone out there who is smart enough to bypass the system.

donavannj
September 7th, 2011, 02:20 PM
I would continue using the commercial internet and proceed to find people who want to create a new network free from commercial interference.

And adding to Vendak's point about bypasses being found, there'd likely be enablers on the service side who disagree with such commercialization.

I do think regulation in the form of internet packages is a terrible idea that stomps out the free flow of information essential to societal and technological advances and just puts huge corporations at a huge advantage.

Esper
September 7th, 2011, 02:24 PM
I don't like this future. I'll admit that I don't think everything under the sun belongs on the internet (e.g., child pornography), but these things can be taken down by ISPs and the law/government when they're found without harming the rest of us.

If I had to pay... I probably wouldn't. I'd just go to those sites which computer savvy people make free with their computer magic. Assuming it couldn't work that way I'd want access to news sites and probably art-related sites. It's kind of ridiculous to try and guess beforehand what sites you'd want access to. I mean, I may need to look up how to cook eggplants and I'm not going to want to pay whatever the price is to get "recipe sites" added to my list of available options just for one look up.

wcdaily
September 7th, 2011, 03:27 PM
I'll just buy a package that lets me connect to the tor server then go from their, all the internet for the price of one, and it's anonymous too. :D

Anyway, no single person really owns the internet anyway, their are tons of servers and websites on the internet, it would be pretty hard to censor them all. Your dns could probably try, but what would be the point of a dns? Anyway if they did do that you could still connect to your websites via ip address.

moments.
September 7th, 2011, 06:08 PM
If the internet ever required EXTRA money I would instantly stop using it, it's as simple as that. I'd spend my days reading angry books instead. We already pay money to our ISP it seems absurd to purchase access to websites on top of that.

Although I am sure if this ever happened, those hacking nerds out there would find a way to bypass it. Technology can never be fully regulated, there's always someone out there who is smart enough to bypass the system.

This is literally, word for word my view. Maybe not 'angry' books though. xP

But yeah, just to add fuel to the argument, I think this actually could be appropriate / possibly beneficial in relation to sites like pornography and stuff. Only because that is stuff that actually has some benefit by censoring in stopping younger users from accessing it.

That's just one example, I'm sure there would be other ways to try and turn it around so it is a positive force, but if they blocked everything, I wouldn't be a happy camper. :P

aruchan
September 7th, 2011, 08:12 PM
1. Social networking (facebook)
2. Informational (Wikipedia, TVTropes)
3. Forums (random)

I could just use an analytical engine instead. :)

Kura
September 7th, 2011, 08:39 PM
We're already needing to rent modems and buy bandwidth.. and some sites are blocked- yes. This future is entirely possible in that respect. However.. in Finland and a few other countries, the internet is free (country-wide) and is actually a human right- the right to know and have information. Compare that to somewhere like China and you have pretty big extremes.

Either way this topic is conceivable.. but I don't foresee it- people would indeed protest and I think it'd only be possible in a dictatorship.

However, this happens even here (example is Hulu or sites that say "Sorry you can't view this in your country blahblah" same with netflix having different availabilities for the canadian and us markets.)

DarkAlucard
September 7th, 2011, 08:56 PM
Haha, this reminded me of a Mayor of a state in Mexico, which said in an interview that he would prohibit in the state, miniskirts and will regulate the Internet.

Personally I think that Internet regulation can't be 100% as has been handled by several sources. Some pages and services will require a payment, but the great majority will remain free.

G.U.Y.
September 7th, 2011, 09:14 PM
Could..we just pay for one site? If so, I'd choose Reddit. If not, I'd have to pick which one that's under.

Either way, I highly doubt something like this would ever happen.

Cassino
September 8th, 2011, 07:47 AM
Most likely sites I'd want on at times wouldn't be offered, and then what?
This is the same as one reason I dislike television — indeed I may do the same as with that and cease to bother almost entirely. It'd just be another thing ruined solely for commercial gain.