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View Full Version : Iconic Artists (post-2k)


Antemortem
July 21st, 2013, 06:13 PM
Who do you think are the most iconic, industry-changing artists/musicians of the last thirteen years? Why do you think that? What are some of their most well-known (or least well-known, but that doesn't necessarily classify 'iconic' now does it?) albums/singles? Do you think they'll continue to be successful down the road or were they one-hit wonders/will quickly be outdone?

Weeaboo Name
July 21st, 2013, 07:14 PM
I believe the biggest change in the music industry in that time would be the influx of advertising in and around music. Not just artists appearing in adverts as that has happened in the past but artists really having influence in the things they're selling, Beyoncé and her H&M clothing collection would be a good example. Another example would be Lady Gaga, she has quite a lot of not so subtle product placement in her videos, Poker Face has bwin.com and Beats headphones (and a lot of other things probably).

That sort of stuff doesn't really annoy me but when it literally starts interfering with music I'm not sure what to think. Justin Timberlke's 'I'm lovin' it' and that Pitbull song where he rhymes 'Kodak' with 'Kodak', pretty cringeworthy if you ask me. I'd also be a bit upset if my favourite artists started releasing songs via tv adverts, like Beyoncé has recently.

'I'm not a businessman, I'm a business, man'

So for me the game changing artists over the last decade or so have been those to embrace this.

Antemortem
July 21st, 2013, 11:41 PM
That sort of stuff doesn't really annoy me but when it literally starts interfering with music I'm not sure what to think. Justin Timberlke's 'I'm lovin' it' and that Pitbull song where he rhymes 'Kodak' with 'Kodak', pretty cringeworthy if you ask me. I'd also be a bit upset if my favourite artists started releasing songs via tv adverts, like Beyoncé has recently.

I don't really find this to be anything awe-striking or revolutionary, though. What I consider to be game-changing, at least on a solo level, would be the sudden change of a style of music an artist does that completely turns around their career. Or, perhaps, an artist or group of artists redesigns what the image of music looks like, which could technically tie back in to your point about advertisements and whatnot, but more in the sense of what Madonna pulled off in the 80s and 90s with her consistently more and more risque image changing how people perceived their musical influences.

Esper
July 22nd, 2013, 08:33 AM
I'm not qualified to answer this, but I'm gonna take a stab and put out the name Mumford & Sons. I remember a little while back people saying that guitar bands were dead, that we'd seen then end of the rock band in popular music, but it doesn't seem like it's dead yet and this is one of the biggest guitar bands out there at the moment.

But like I said, not qualified to give a good opinion on this.

Weeaboo Name
July 22nd, 2013, 11:13 AM
I don't really find this to be anything awe-striking or revolutionary, though. What I consider to be game-changing, at least on a solo level, would be the sudden change of a style of music an artist does that completely turns around their career. Or, perhaps, an artist or group of artists redesigns what the image of music looks like, which could technically tie back in to your point about advertisements and whatnot, but more in the sense of what Madonna pulled off in the 80s and 90s with her consistently more and more risque image changing how people perceived their musical influences.

Back then artists doing advertising was simple, they advertise a product in a commercial and get paid for it. Now advertising is running a lot deeper, to the extent that high profile artists are making more money from contracts with multi national corporations than they are through album sales and touring. The fact is this is a pretty new phenomenon and will only continue to grow and become more visible.

As for your comment one artists/groups redesigning themselves, that isn't a new thing. They change for lots of reasons be it financially, just wanting to do something different or because it is what their label say to do. Take Cliff Richard, he broke through as some sort of Brit alternative to Elvis but not long after he was putting out middle of the road pop music and even venturing into Contemporary Christian.

I'm not qualified to answer this, but I'm gonna take a stab and put out the name Mumford & Sons. I remember a little while back people saying that guitar bands were dead, that we'd seen then end of the rock band in popular music, but it doesn't seem like it's dead yet and this is one of the biggest guitar bands out there at the moment.

But like I said, not qualified to give a good opinion on this.

I like them but if they were to stop putting out music now I doubt I'd remember them in 20 years time. Bands like The Strokes, The Killers, Kings of Leon, Franz Ferdinand, Gorillaz, Travis, Death Cab for Cutie and Arctic Monkeys would be better examples of commercially successful alternative bands. We are not in a golden age of this kind of music but it certainly isn't dead.

Rest
July 23rd, 2013, 02:47 AM
If I had to pick an artist that's changed the scape of the music industry in the past decade, I'd say Jay-Z, hands-down. Besides releasing albums that were influential and critically-acclaimed in the '00s, he was commercially successful and became a cultural icon, constantly peaking on a high note in the Billboard charts and making rounds in the tabloids. He's founded Roc Nation and signed on the likes of Rihanna, Calvin Harris, Rita Ora, Willow Smith, J. Cole, and Shakira, all of whom have come to be very well-known and popular. To top it all off, he married Beyoncé and redefined the term "power couple". He's estimated to be at a net worth of $500 million, and he's one of the richest artists alive. He's iconic, no doubt.

I like them but if they were to stop putting out music now I doubt I'd remember them in 20 years time. Bands like The Strokes, The Killers, Kings of Leon, Franz Ferdinand, Gorillaz, Travis, Death Cab for Cutie and Arctic Monkeys would be better examples of commercially successful alternative bands. We are not in a golden age of this kind of music but it certainly isn't dead.

Agreed, the bands and artists you've mentioned played a large role in ushering in the influx of folk/indie rock/electronic artists into mainstream attention during the '00s and well into this current decade, and their influence has been far-reaching. If I'm correct, mainstream music during the '90s and early, early '00s were predominantly R&B-driven until the likes of The Strokes and Gorillaz hit the airwaves.

Esper
July 23rd, 2013, 12:38 PM
I like them but if they were to stop putting out music now I doubt I'd remember them in 20 years time. Bands like The Strokes, The Killers, Kings of Leon, Franz Ferdinand, Gorillaz, Travis, Death Cab for Cutie and Arctic Monkeys would be better examples of commercially successful alternative bands. We are not in a golden age of this kind of music but it certainly isn't dead.

I suppose if you listen to those bands they'll feel special, but I know only half of them so the others feel like they just exist without adding anything special to the wider world of music. But that's kind of how I feel about this topic in general. I just get the feeling that the major marks in music history are mostly behind us since there is so much music that no one gets to shine like Elvis or Bob Dylan or Michael Jackson or whoever.

Patchisou Yutohru
July 23rd, 2013, 05:19 PM
If I had to pick an artist that's changed the scape of the music industry in the past decade, I'd say Jay-Z, hands-down. Besides releasing albums that were influential and critically-acclaimed in the '00s, he was commercially successful and became a cultural icon, constantly peaking on a high note in the Billboard charts and making rounds in the tabloids. He's founded Roc Nation and signed on the likes of Rihanna, Calvin Harris, Rita Ora, Willow Smith, J. Cole, and Shakira, all of whom have come to be very well-known and popular. To top it all off, he married Beyoncé and redefined the term "power couple". He's estimated to be at a net worth of $500 million, and he's one of the richest artists alive. He's iconic, no doubt.
Not trying to discredit Jay-Z - I think he's done a great deal for the hip hop community - but how do those points really relate to how he changed the industry?

Unfortunately, I have to give props to Madonna during her earlier years for her influence that still rings true today and how her sound helped pave the way for pop music for years to come. Also, as a Gaga fan, I don't understand the claims in how she changed the music industry (especially when they use Just Dance as a reason). To me, her music sounds different from everything else in pop music, but its still the same EDM that's been around and dominated pop music for quite a few years.

Rest
July 24th, 2013, 02:13 AM
Not trying to discredit Jay-Z - I think he's done a great deal for the hip hop community - but how do those points really relate to how he changed the industry?

Oops, I meant to post from the "iconic" angle. Changing the industry though? I think besides helping to form a part of what kind of music we hear on radio right now, he hasn't done anything that's changed the music industry at large, at least stylistically. Jay-Z isn't like Madonna or Michael Jackson, who have influenced the styles of artists from all kinds of music genres. He's a niche artist by and large. He also certainly hasn't done anything to change the way we listen to music today, like what Dr. Dre or Daniel Ek has done with Beats and Spotify respectively.

I think with Jay-Z, he's a cultural symbol. He's the epitome of the musician who made it big, and that influences or at least motivates many artists today struggling to achieve the kind of greatness he's achieved. At least that's my view on how he's changed the industry.