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phunboy
January 24th, 2006, 05:05 PM
Well, this came to me awhile back and I was wondering how do you fight in a battle against a Pokémon whether wild or a trainers?

To me there are 4 types of ways you can fight:
Head On (Simply straight out attacking them)
Carefully (Using defense moves like Harden)
Status Effecting (Effecting Status like using Poison Powder)
Stat Effecting (Effecting Stats like using Growl)

Me personally I tend to do it Head On with a touch of Status Effecting when necessary and I shy away from the Careful and Stat Effecting approaches. Therefore I chose the choice Combination of the Above.

I made it so you can choose multiple choices so feel free to choose 2 or more if you like.

Sammi
January 24th, 2006, 05:08 PM
I'm usually a head-on person. I just want it over with. XD
It usually works for me.

I only use Careful and Status Effecting when I think I'm at a disadvantage, like higher levels and gym leader battles.

Synchronize
January 24th, 2006, 05:13 PM
Head on for in the wild.
Strategically AS POSSIBLE vs gyms/stronger trainers earlier in the game.
Head on vs trainers later on in the game.
And just straight out skill and defensive switching vs my lil bro or on NB.

flarizardmew
January 24th, 2006, 06:08 PM
i always go head on because i have 8 level 100 pokemon so i don't worry about type disadvantages becasue even a move that's not effective, it faints the pokemon in one hit any. HEAD ON BABY!!!!

Jack_Skellington
January 24th, 2006, 06:32 PM
I would personally say my Pokemon Battling style would be a combination of all of them. I usualy have 3 DEF Pokemon, meaning that they have mostly status causing effects, such as my Crobat havign Supersonic, Confuse Ray, etc. And the other three having full on kill kill KILL attacks, such as my Dargonite haveing Hyper Beam, Take Down, etc. So, yeah, there it is......>_>...

~Amethyst_Callista_Moon~
January 24th, 2006, 09:41 PM
All that matters is that I want to win! XD~

Drummershuff
January 25th, 2006, 02:17 AM
I just useally like to get it over and done with, so i do it head on.

~BlackHeartedWolf~
January 25th, 2006, 07:03 AM
Well, I do sometimes do all of them, depending on the battle situation, but for the most part, I'm a Head-On type person =)

Eon-Rider
January 25th, 2006, 07:06 AM
I kinda no combos but I mostly play head-on.

Dragonite Tamer
January 25th, 2006, 09:06 AM
I mainly use strong and accurate moves so I finish it all quickly.

Alter Ego
January 25th, 2006, 09:13 AM
I guess I'm more of a combination guy, myself. Unless the pokémon in question is a Choice Bander I always keep a status-inflicting, stat-raising, counter-attacking, or HP-recovery move there for a rainy day, I mean, it's not like I usually need more than 3 damaging moves, anyway. But is healing/counter attacking considered careful battling or what? Anyways, my average strategy is to sitt about and buff up a bit and then sweep my opponents away, level advantages are fickle and not to be relied upon, Thunder Wave and Will-O-Wisp are more my thing, although of course, if I have a significant level/type advantage I'm not shy about using it. ^-^ On Netbattle I play more or less the same way, although my pokémon builds tend to be more specialized, I think more carefully about what I do, and I use a lot more switching.

Shiny Meganium
January 25th, 2006, 09:16 AM
I usually go head on with force. I like moves like Earthquake and Flamethrower. Sometimes I put the opponent to sleep or poison the opponent if my Pokemon has week attacks or stats. For me it depends on the Pokemon.

*~Silver~*
January 27th, 2006, 06:04 PM
I'm the careful type, unless I know the pokemon pretty well I go against going head-on. That can be a gamble.

phunboy
January 27th, 2006, 08:20 PM
I'm the careful type, unless I know the pokemon pretty well I go against going head-on. That can be a gamble.
Well, your the first so far to go the careful route.

Me personally I feel careful moves are a bit of a waste so anytime a Pokémon learns a new move that has to replace another to be learned I always replace careful moves as well as stat effecting moves.

I feel if you do a move to raise your attack then next move attack why not rather just attack 2 times and do more damage course I'm a head on battler especially when trying to level up my Pokémon.

Crosman
January 27th, 2006, 10:43 PM
When I battle my friends or any given challenger I always keep my battling style a secret but when Im posting I let it all hang out.

I have three different team which combine many different battling styles. When I use my all Rock/Fighitng/Steel team it turns out to be a all out assualt.

With my Exeggutor/Crobat combination it turn out ot be a slow but deadly battle.

BROOKE_&_LUGIA
January 28th, 2006, 08:29 PM
I'm usually a head-on person. I just want it over with.

Same here :D . I just try to get it over as fast as possible (lol).

Chiru
January 29th, 2006, 09:04 AM
I usually go head-on, unless I'm battling a gym leader or the elite four. Then I'm much more careful, and I use a ton of status & stat-affecting moves. When it seems like I'm at a disadvantage, I rely on strategy.

[Paper Wings]
January 29th, 2006, 09:15 AM
I'm the head-on type. Always. The best defense is the good offense, I say. But in the time it takes to Harden or Howl, you could've drained half your opponent's HP, so what's the point?

Alter Ego
January 29th, 2006, 09:43 AM
Well, your the first so far to go the careful route.

Me personally I feel careful moves are a bit of a waste so anytime a Pokémon learns a new move that has to replace another to be learned I always replace careful moves as well as stat effecting moves.

I feel if you do a move to raise your attack then next move attack why not rather just attack 2 times and do more damage course I'm a head on battler especially when trying to level up my Pokémon.

Erm...maybe because once you've buffed up with, say...3 Swords Dances and have a suitable arsenal of physical moves you can sweep away not only the current opponent but also more or less everything else your opponent has got to throw at you? In my experience, head-on attacking is the staple of careless opponents who are easy to stump with a little strategy. -.- And at any rate, buffing moves should always be accompanied by healing moves in my opinion. That way you can max out your chosen stat(s), remove the damage your opponent caused in the mean time and then just massacre them.

']I'm the head-on type. Always. The best defense is the good offense, I say. But in the time it takes to Harden or Howl, you could've drained half your opponent's HP, so what's the point?

Ever heard of Counter or Mirror Coat? Or perhaps more importantly, ever felt them? The difference between a one-hit KO and a two-hit KO becomes quite glaringly obvious in that instance. The best way to defeat an opponent is to either whittle their HP away with status/weather effects or to hit them once and hit them hard, even if that hit requires a bit of preparation. Although I do agree that moves like Howl and Harden are a waste. Swords Dance and Iron Defense are more like it. However, that comparison is kind of faulty because it is just about as valid as me asking...why should anyone go head-on with 'Rapid Spin or Bubble?', picking the lowest-class stat-affecting moves and railing against them is kind of an awkward way to prove your point. :\

Chronos
January 29th, 2006, 09:48 AM
I go with head on. Elemental advantage I sometimes go for depending on the level, but I never go for status inducing moves unless I'm trying to catch something. I see no point in putting something to sleep with Hypnosis then using Dream Eater with a Gengar when you could just as easily kill the Pokemon with Psychic.

Random Plushie
January 29th, 2006, 11:44 AM
I usually always start off with buffing or otherwise status inflicting moves, and then just heal the damage away when I'm done powering up. It's fun to massacre teams that way. :3

Or, if I'm not using that kind of Pokemon, I kill them off slowly with annoying moves.

I only go head-on if I'm playing in-game, or if I have buffed up enough where I'm sure they'll go down in one hit.

I go with head on. Elemental advantage I sometimes go for depending on the level, but I never go for status inducing moves unless I'm trying to catch something. I see no point in putting something to sleep with Hypnosis then using Dream Eater with a Gengar when you could just as easily kill the Pokemon with Psychic.

Eh? Psychic on Gengar? :/

[Paper Wings]
January 29th, 2006, 12:56 PM
Ever heard of Counter or Mirror Coat? Or perhaps more importantly, ever felt them? The difference between a one-hit KO and a two-hit KO becomes quite glaringly obvious in that instance. The best way to defeat an opponent is to either whittle their HP away with status/weather effects or to hit them once and hit them hard, even if that hit requires a bit of preparation. Although I do agree that moves like Howl and Harden are a waste. Swords Dance and Iron Defense are more like it. However, that comparison is kind of faulty because it is just about as valid as me asking...why should anyone go head-on with 'Rapid Spin or Bubble?', picking the lowest-class stat-affecting moves and railing against them is kind of an awkward way to prove your point. :\


Yes, but how often do you come across Counter or Mirror Coat? Once in a blue moon, unless you're in a area full of Wobbuffet, and in the end, there still aren't very many places for that, either. And don't tell me, "Well when you battle against your friends!" I have no one like that to battle against, so in my many years of being a blacksheep of the fandom, I've only seen both moves being used a handful of times each.

But I know what they can do. I've been hit with them. I'm not incompetent. But in a double battle, if you're quick enough and plan right, you can evade the blow by focusing both of your attacks on the Pokémon that has the move and hope they add up to a KO. Single battle? Same thing, but if that fails... Then dem. Just try again. Why drag the battle out because you're too afraid to take a chance and use a high-damage attack?

But I'm more hard-headed than a Bagon with Rock Head, so I still don't see the point in moves that don't do damage (this includes status-inflicting moves, but I'll occassionally use those) and I doubt I ever will. I'm just violent like that. :D

phunboy
January 29th, 2006, 05:24 PM
Erm...maybe because once you've buffed up with, say...3 Swords Dances and have a suitable arsenal of physical moves you can sweep away not only the current opponent but also more or less everything else your opponent has got to throw at you? In my experience, head-on attacking is the staple of careless opponents who are easy to stump with a little strategy. -.- And at any rate, buffing moves should always be accompanied by healing moves in my opinion. That way you can max out your chosen stat(s), remove the damage your opponent caused in the mean time and then just massacre them.

Ya a strategy like that only works when going against trainers and not wild Pokémon because the point of such a strategy is to beat up multiple Pokémon in a row with one of yours but in the wild that isn't the case and last I checked in Pokémon games you battle ton's of wild Pokémon and just a few handful of trainers so tailoring a Pokémon to battle Pokémon trainers like that are less effective against wild Pokémon unless of course you don't mind waiting but most people I think like to get a fight with a wild Pokémon done as fast as possible unless of course they want to capture said Pokémon in which case you still wouldn't use the strategy because one by the time your stat is raised it could run away, two if you wanna capture it you obviously don't wanna raise your attack and decimate them in one hit.

Smarties-chan
January 30th, 2006, 05:55 AM
Ya a strategy like that only works when going against trainers and not wild Pokémon because the point of such a strategy is to beat up multiple Pokémon in a row with one of yours but in the wild that isn't the case and last I checked in Pokémon games you battle ton's of wild Pokémon and just a few handful of trainers so tailoring a Pokémon to battle Pokémon trainers like that are less effective against wild Pokémon unless of course you don't mind waiting but most people I think like to get a fight with a wild Pokémon done as fast as possible unless of course they want to capture said Pokémon in which case you still wouldn't use the strategy because one by the time your stat is raised it could run away, two if you wanna capture it you obviously don't wanna raise your attack and decimate them in one hit.
Since when have wild Pokémon...

a) Been even close to the level of your own Pokémon (unless you have been sloppy with the training -_-)?

b) Had so high stats that you actually need to buff up against them? -_-

Also... To be honest, how many wild Pokémon actually run away? Besides, if you actually use a Pokémon in your team and your Pokémon is weak enough not to one hit-KO a let's say... Larvitar your Pokémon is rather pathetic -_- And catching Pokémon is exactly what stallers are good for.

Anyway... I prefer inflicting a status or a similar condition (Leech seed and Will-o-wisp are my absolute favourites ^_^), then hit the opponent hard. Of course most of my teams also include a buffer, and a Charizard with Swords Dance, a decent flying attack and Earthquake is pretty darn much deadlier than a pathetic spec.sweeper Charizard >.>

Alter Ego
January 30th, 2006, 05:56 AM
Ya a strategy like that only works when going against trainers and not wild Pokémon because the point of such a strategy is to beat up multiple Pokémon in a row with one of yours but in the wild that isn't the case and last I checked in Pokémon games you battle ton's of wild Pokémon and just a few handful of trainers so tailoring a Pokémon to battle Pokémon trainers like that are less effective against wild Pokémon unless of course you don't mind waiting but most people I think like to get a fight with a wild Pokémon done as fast as possible unless of course they want to capture said Pokémon in which case you still wouldn't use the strategy because one by the time your stat is raised it could run away, two if you wanna capture it you obviously don't wanna raise your attack and decimate them in one hit.

Let me see if I got this straight...you only train pokémon to fight against wild pokémon? Excuse me if i lol here but...lol, wild pokémon are crap. Anything with a damaging move and even an equal level can beat a wild pokémon, it's the trainer battles that actually provide some challenge (Although most of them are way too easy). There's about as much sense in training a whole team of pokémon specifically to beat wild ones as there is in training a Machamp specifically to beat Rattatas. Concerning your comment about their amount...you call that a handfull? I do know for a fact that playing through Emerald requires you to enter several hundreds of trainer battles, easy, and that's not counting rematches. But yes, if you are the rather sad type that considers running about in a small patch of grass for hours at an end and beating wild pokémon after wild pokémon rather than going out and finding some real battles the best part of the pokémon games then...fine. Still, it doesn't change the fact that a buffing move doesn't make a pokémon any less competent at beating wild ones, unless we're just counting the total PP value of damaging moves, which is a very poor measure of power. -.-

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Yes, but how often do you come across Counter or Mirror Coat? Once in a blue moon, unless you're in a area full of Wobbuffet, and in the end, there still aren't very many places for that, either. And don't tell me, "Well when you battle against your friends!" I have no one like that to battle against, so in my many years of being a blacksheep of the fandom, I've only seen both moves being used a handful of times each.

I take it, you don't have pokémon Emerald then? Ho-hum, probably not. If you did then you'd know that you can't swing around a dead chinook in that place without hitting something with a counter attack move. -.- Not only do a good deal of the generic opponent builds have them, but also at least three of the Frontier Brains' pokémon (Lucy's Milotic and Tucker's Swampert come to mind) . And for your information, the Battle Pyramid sometimes has escape blockers for a theme, in which case the whole place is indeed swarming with Wobbuffet. And you don't need friends with cable-connecting to battle another human. Go type in 'NetBattle' in google or whatever search engine you like to use and you'll see what I mean.

phunboy
January 30th, 2006, 06:35 PM
Let me see if I got this straight...you only train pokémon to fight against wild pokémon? Excuse me if i lol here but...lol, wild pokémon are crap. Anything with a damaging move and even an equal level can beat a wild pokémon, it's the trainer battles that actually provide some challenge (Although most of them are way too easy). There's about as much sense in training a whole team of pokémon specifically to beat wild ones as there is in training a Machamp specifically to beat Rattatas. Concerning your comment about their amount...you call that a handfull? I do know for a fact that playing through Emerald requires you to enter several hundreds of trainer battles, easy, and that's not counting rematches. But yes, if you are the rather sad type that considers running about in a small patch of grass for hours at an end and beating wild pokémon after wild pokémon rather than going out and finding some real battles the best part of the pokémon games then...fine. Still, it doesn't change the fact that a buffing move doesn't make a pokémon any less competent at beating wild ones, unless we're just counting the total PP value of damaging moves, which is a very poor measure of power. -.-
Never said that, I just meant to specifically train Pokémon to deal with trainer's when you overall battle way more wild Pokémon seems a bit of a waste of time as you will mainly battle wild Pokémon and not trainers as last I checked battling a ton of wild Pokémon is why your Pokémon can get to levels necessary to learn the moves you speak of.

I don't train my Pokémon to be good at either going against wild Pokémon or trainers solely, I train them to be able to go against both as all trainers should do. Because training a Pokémon to solely go against just wild Pokémon or just trainers is foolish as you need to train them for both as you go against both.

Alter Ego
February 1st, 2006, 07:12 AM
Never said that, I just meant to specifically train Pokémon to deal with trainer's when you overall battle way more wild Pokémon seems a bit of a waste of time as you will mainly battle wild Pokémon and not trainers as last I checked battling a ton of wild Pokémon is why your Pokémon can get to levels necessary to learn the moves you speak of.

I don't train my Pokémon to be good at either going against wild Pokémon or trainers solely, I train them to be able to go against both as all trainers should do. Because training a Pokémon to solely go against just wild Pokémon or just trainers is foolish as you need to train them for both as you go against both.

But a trainer's pokémon is just like a wild pokémon except that it's stronger, has a better moveset and a smarter AI. So if you train a pokémon capable of defeating a bunch of trained pokémon then it will have no probelm whatsoever of beating some random wild ones. Yes, I fight a lot of wild pokémon, but I don't stick my pokémon movesets full of as many high-PP damaging moves as possible (Which, arguably, would be the best ones for fighting wild pokémon as you will always have a significant level advantage against them (Unless you really suck at the game) and so would be able to OHKO them with just about anything that deals damage) I fail to see how for instance, adding in Swords Dance, which can actually make the difference between life and death in a real battle, would have made my Absol's three remaining attack moves any less suited for fighting wild pokémon. Quite frankly, I don't know what the heck you are going on about.

Bekki
February 1st, 2006, 08:23 AM
Well I use what ever is nessecery at the time, but I always use Pokemon that have an advantage over others. i.e. if some one used rock then I will use Grass, Water or Ice.

aragornbird
February 1st, 2006, 03:07 PM
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In game, I always hit hard and fast since that’s the quickest way to finish a battle. Unless, of course, the Pokemon I’m training is more defensive, like Dusclops or Umbreon. Then its status time!

But on Netbattle, that’s a whole different story. You really have to balance a whole different variety of strategies. My current team uses lots of Baton Passing, some sweeping, some walling, and I could probably do with a phazer and spinner.

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