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Conversation Between Rezilia and Cerberus87
Showing Visitor Messages 1 to 10 of 14
  1. Cerberus87
    November 24th, 2013 02:53 PM
    Cerberus87
    I'm good at exams, but I hate them. Partially because the people who make them are stupid.

    In my country, everything is dictated by exams. All state workers are chosen by exams. Lawyers can't be lawyers until they pass an exam. Oh, they want to stipulate that for doctors, too. I HATE THAT.

    Another reason for my decline is that the exams at college didn't reward effort. I studied a lot and my 10 (A in your case) was worth the same as the guy who did the minimum possible. Aggregating something to classes wasn't necessary. That, combined with teachers who give grades according to their mood, made me give up on trying to score good grades at university.

    So I totally get what you're saying.

    Another problem is that, because of this overreliance on exams, there are a lot of private courses which focus on these exams only. They cost a lot of money. So they create an industry of courses and their owners become rich as a result.
  2. Rezilia
    November 23rd, 2013 01:25 PM
    Rezilia
    Ever heard someone say that they were just "bad test takers"?

    The common idea there is that such people are simply stupid and they use that as an excuse.

    I got all A's and B's in my classes in high school. I normally ACTUALLY learned things, turned in homework (which I aced), and actually paid attention in class. Whenever tests rolled around, on the other hand, I did terrible on them.

    Though I aced my AP classes, I failed the AP tests. I was one of about four people in my AP US History class that actually took my work seriously and thus I was one of the rare few to ace it. However, I completely failed the AP Exam they gave us at the end of the year. This kept me from getting many scholarships for college.


    You've read my posts. Tell me: Do I seem stupid to you? Exactly.

    The idea that people can be bad test takers is true. There have been many psychological studies over this phenomenon and it's been shown that the majority of those that actively participate in their studies do horribly on tests. Thus, the students in the top 10 are those that both paid attention and, miraculously, didn't have said psychological issues. It was all a game of luck, not of skill.


    Now, in the U.S., schools are making it so that grades only come from tests results - no class participation, no homework, nothing except tests. And even in your nation (and Japan, I believe), whether or not you can get into schools at certain levels or for free - it all depends on test scores, nothing else.


    How fair is that? Hm?
  3. Cerberus87
    November 21st, 2013 10:48 PM
    Cerberus87
    The US surprises me negatively in more ways than one...

    However not all is roses. Since places are limited, they run an exam to see who enters university. If you don't pass, you can't study for free.
  4. Rezilia
    November 21st, 2013 03:26 PM
    Rezilia
    Well, that's how it SHOULD be: The government pays, the student doesn't. Unfortunately, my country doesn't work like that =.=;
  5. Cerberus87
    November 21st, 2013 03:16 PM
    Cerberus87
    Well nothing is really free, in reality the government pays for it, but the student studies for free.
  6. Rezilia
    November 21st, 2013 01:28 PM
    Rezilia
    Eh, Brazil? Free college? I'll remember that. Here in the U.S., it's tens of thousands of dollars. per year.
  7. Cerberus87
    November 18th, 2013 11:06 PM
    Cerberus87
    Thanks for explanation, that was refreshing. The grail got tainted because the Einzberns summoned a servant in one of the early wars that was a servant upon which all the evil wishes of mankind were imprinted, and he was weak so he was defeated easily and sucked into the grail, but, since the grail grants wishes, and he was the embodiment of bad wishes, the grail was tainted and doomed to serve only the evil in the world. Which is why the grail becomes evil energy and corrupts Kotomine and Gilgamesh at the end of Fate/Zero.

    Yeah I love it.

    In my case my degree was worth squat because here in Brazil to work as lawyer you need to take YET another exam to evaluate your knowledge. It was pretty annoying and I was on the verge of a nervous breakdown before learning I passed, since I didn't want to have to study stuff all over again.

    Public university is free but funded by taxes.

    I was so lucky the local Animax channel decided to broadcast FSN on a whim before going down, without it I wouldn't know about the Nasuverse today and possibly wouldn't even have started writing my book, or the book would've been completely different.
  8. Rezilia
    November 18th, 2013 10:28 PM
    Rezilia
    Ooooh, Holy Grail War!

    It's actually simple. I may be wrong in the following, but I'll try to explain it to the best of my years-old knowledge.

    The holy grails is one of...five?... hallowed items. It can grant any wish. However, due to equivalency, something must be given in return for the wish. This takes the form of a grand competition known as the holy grail war. Each war that happens, masters - humans with enough vital energy to create summoning spells - summon the spirits of heroes in the past. These heroes are generally in nice, luxurious realms fit for the heroes to reward them in the afterlife, or something. When they get summoned, the holy grail gives them material form. These heroes become the servants to their masters. They then go to kill one another. At the end, the servants lose all memory of the grail war. However, the winning master and servant each get a wish. Normally, the participating masters want access to this giant fountain of infinite knowledge - I think it's the Akasha, though it might be something else. If anyone gets there, everyone forgets they existed, I believe, and they can't ever leave the Akasha once they go there.

    Cool stuff.

    --

    College is a scam. You go there to learn, not to be thrown at exams. The professors tend to make you read textbooks on your own and don't teach you themselves. You then graduate only to find that your degree isn't worth anything anymore.

    Plus, I'm a proponent of the "Knowledge Is Free" concept, so I hate the fact that you have to pay for college. Or if you get a scholarship that pays for everything and you drop your grades enough, you're then forced to pay the entire amount back to the scholarship. And yet you're paying for teachers that don't teach, for a degree that means nothing, and think yourself smart just because you aced a few tests, only for Dr. Cox to put you in your place once you get out.
  9. Cerberus87
    November 17th, 2013 02:22 PM
    Cerberus87
    I'm very sorry for not answering in time. I just found out I posted my answer in my own profile, not yours. My apologies.

    Actually in my experience I've found the opposite. It seems to me that schools are giving up memorization in favor of giving the students the ability to understand and rebuild the codes they learn, as well as possibly creating something anew.

    However, I won't say you aren't right. Recently, high schools in my country have resumed the teaching of philosophy, but it's still like what you said it is, they feed the student with info on a one-way route and make him/her sit exams. I'm good at exams, but I've always found I was lacking in certain other areas, because, really, most exams have rigged questions. An exam master isn't a master of wisdom. In terms of examination, my country is still behind the developed world, because we use exams for EVERYTHING.

    I'm writing a novel and much of it is influenced by the Nasuverse. I actually thought the explanation of the fundamentals of the Holy Grail War was quite complex in the VN. I don't remember most of it, though, because it's been four years since I read it.

    Why is college a heated subject for you? You can write in PM if it's something delicate.
  10. Rezilia
    November 11th, 2013 07:29 PM
    Rezilia
    In college, huh? That's...a heated subject for me.

    There are generally two forms of learning humans use: Passive and Active. When we learn things passively, we remember them only to replay that memory later on. When we learn actively, we involve ourselves directly and gain "experience" in said subject. Memory leads to Knowledge. Experience leads to Understanding. Intelligence is the ability to attain and use knowledge. Wisdom is the ability to attain and utilize understanding. This is how I see things.

    Increasingly, over time, educational institutions have taken out active learning and now, for the most part, rely solely on passive learning. For a subject like Philosophy - which is literally defined as the "love of/for wisdom", reading textbooks and taking tests over what philosophers have said just plain isn't enough. You have to "philosophize" on your own, of your own will to truly understand philosophy and DO philosophy, to that regard.

    That said, philosophy does not focus solely on the senses and the physical, nor calculations made in regards to the physical. This is why metaphysics and ethics are more than scientific laws and rules of society.

    This said, I did not create my own knowledge system. Rather, I made my own beliefs by "philosophizing" the things I learned and, by doing so, generated my own truths. These truths are heavily influenced by the Nasuverse and Theosophy, by the way, so you could definitely say my beliefs are more alchemical in nature than scientific or simply philosophical.

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