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Old October 13th, 2012, 07:00 PM
FreakyLocz14's Avatar
FreakyLocz14
Conservative Patriot
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Join Date: Jun 2009
Gender: Female
Nature: Bold
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. X View Post
I wanted to say this before, but not all Mexicans are brown and not all Africans are Black. If you think that Ethnicity is determined by your skin color, or that Ethnicity determines skin color, then you are a bona fide racist.

Hatred/Discrimination isn't a religious value. If you are trying to pride it on a Christian image, then you wouldn't allow discrimination in it. Afterall, we are all equal under God right?
I have almost pale white skin, yet I have no white blood in me. I am almost completely Mexican, with just a dash of Native-American. I know what you are talking about. Having the image of being an authentic Mexican restaurant doesn't necessarily mean brown-skinned. Hispanic surnames can also apply.

What is or allowed in any given religion varies greatly, by the way.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kura View Post
Sexual orientation is confidential in any interview or job position. You have the right to refuse stating that. If you want to state it, yes you may jepordize your personal appeal because they may question your passion to the Christian community or how other Christians may view you, etc, and may turn you away based on that rather than based on a personal vendetta, but IMO it's pretty unlikely. But no. If you are qualified then no, they technically shouldn't refuse you employment.. but an employer can usually fire you or not hire you based on no criteria within a certain timeframe (1-3 months.) They legally don't even need to give a reason even if their discrimination was the case.
You just pointed out a big flaw in nondiscrimination laws: they are very hard to enforce. Since most employment is at-will, employers don't have to give a reason for why they choose not to hire someone, or why they choose to let employees go. How can we justify spending tax dollars on administering agencies that enforce nondiscrimination laws, when our laws also make it easy to discriminate discreetly?
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