Thread: [Discussion] Anonymous
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Old February 11th, 2013 (12:37 AM). Edited February 11th, 2013 by twocows.
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twocows
Pretentious Intellectual Jerk
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Quote originally posted by AlexTheRose:
Did you even read his post? It's an idea. It's not about anonymity, it's about the idea of coming through where the corrupted won't.
Did you even read my post? "Anonymous" originally was about anonymity (as the name would suggest), it was about being able to speak without fear of reprisal. It was a label for a society of outcasts, a group of dissidents who laughed at how the "civilized majority" would end up crawling around in the mud because of their own greed and malice. Being anonymous meant you could speak your mind, however awful what you had to say might have sounded. Anonymous communication was just the means to the true ideal: complete and genuine freedom of expression. It exposed us, exposed our raw humanity, with all the social rules and customs and niceties stripped away. Reading what people said was like looking at human nature, OUR nature. It was so utterly... human. It's hardly surprising that a fair number of people found it abhorrent, outcasts that we were, but I still think it was beautiful.

That community has ceased to exist in any meaningful way, though. In 2008, a bunch of self-important fools co-opted the name and turned it into some political BS. People did it before, but nobody really thought much of it, it was usually just a few idiots. But this time, it exploded. And as that movement gained popularity, it led the rest of the world to us, which in turn drove most of us elsewhere, fracturing the community. The new crowd just didn't (and doesn't) get why it was special because they had nothing worth concealing. They were (and are) normal and utterly boring, probably because they never suffered the way we did. Strength comes from overcoming adversity, not from being handed life on a silver platter.

The political movement that sprang up as a result of the 2008 drama is just laughable. They see themselves as righteous vigilantes. They're not. They're the internet's Tea Party or Westboro Baptist Church. Except instead of shouting so loud that nobody can hear the opposing argument, they shout so loud that nobody can access some group's website. Picking an unpopular target doesn't make the means any more acceptable.

The best part, though, is that there's absolutely no accountability to this "political movement." What happens when someone's wrongly accused of something and hundreds or even thousands of people harass him at all hours of the day as a result? Who's accountable? No one is, that's who. Someone who did nothing wrong suffers because people can't be bothered to fact-check and nobody is held responsible. It sure is great to be judge, jury, and executioner, right up until the point where you behead an innocent man.

These people need to get off their high horses. They're no different than the rest of us, save their highly inflated egos. If you're going to do something bad, own up to it. Don't cloak it in a bunch of political rhetoric so you can say they had it coming and feel a little better about yourself.
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