Thread: [Discussion] A Dark Hypothesis.
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Old July 30th, 2013, 10:05 AM
Kanzler
スペースディスコ 82.
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Toronto
Age: 20
Gender: Male
Nature: Relaxed
The answer to the first is more economic than biological. With more development you get more urbanization, better access to contraception, but also more education and employment opportunity for women, a higher emphasis on education in an urban requirement that increases parenthood involvement (which would also decrease the number of children born due to parenting becoming more "intensive"), among many other changing values.

I'd argue economics because the demographic transition is highly correlated to development (around 0.8 just looking at some scatterplots), and because the process is coupled to the developmental process with Western Europe going through their transition over the Industrial Revolution and achieving their low birth rates around 50 years ago, and with developing countries achieving drops in birth rate more or less in a way corresponding to their level of development.

It would be interesting if higher rates of non-straight people are triggered due to population pressures. We could go pretty wild with the hypotheses on how this would happen and why it would have a selective rationality, but I don't think we have any idea where to begin.

A counter-argument would be that the gay liberation movement occured during the 60's and 70's, when the birth rate most of the Western World were well on their way south or had pretty much reached today's levels - so the drop in birth rate was well on its way to completion before this apparent increase in non-straight people. This would drop the whole biological argument for me, because once there's an exception to one part of the human species (the West), it's hard to argue that it's general to mankind.
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