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View Poll Results: What language do you most prominently code in?
C 2 11.11%
C# 3 16.67%
C++ 4 22.22%
Objective-C 1 5.56%
Java 3 16.67%
Python 0 0%
HTML, CSS, or JavaScript 3 16.67%
Other 2 11.11%
Voters: 18. You may not vote on this poll

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  #1    
Old November 18th, 2013 (6:48 PM). Edited November 20th, 2013 by JalordaSerpent.
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// who here is a developer?
So, basically what the title says. Who here, reading this thread, is, or has been, a developer in some way, shape, or form? This can be from web design to mobile app developing, etc.

If you are a developer, then what languages do you code in? Examples can include C, C#, C++, Java, Python, Ruby, Objective-C, the list never ends! Above also is a poll with more of the popular programming languages as selection bullets. Feel free to select the language you code most in.

To start this off, I can say that I can freely code in Lua, Java, Python, and HTML / CSS. Still working on C++, but I'm getting there. The most prominent language I code in is Java.
Let somebody else try first.
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Old November 18th, 2013 (6:51 PM).
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I currently code in CSS mostly, just for signatures here on PC, but it's still the same type of CSS y'all would use on websites as well.. and I have coded in HTML in the past and PHP as well.
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Old November 18th, 2013 (6:55 PM).
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Old November 19th, 2013 (2:51 AM).
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I'm using C++ on Nintendo 3DS, C# on Wii U (Unity3D), and PHP on web.
I've never made any Desktop/Mobile/Metro/Modern Apps before, only games and Web Apps.

If you've made something that's easy to understand, C++ is a great language.
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  #5    
Old November 19th, 2013 (3:11 AM).
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Just a student writing mostly C++ at this point. More clunky than expected, but it does get the job done... fast.

I also dabble in a bit of C#, Python, and PHP on the side.
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  #6    
Old November 19th, 2013 (7:52 AM).
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Java is my favourite language, trying to get better at it. About to start development on my game soon with it.

Other than that I'm pretty familiar with the typical web dev languages (HTML/CSS/PHP/Javascript etc. etc.).
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  #7    
Old December 1st, 2013 (10:10 AM). Edited December 1st, 2013 by Roybrus.
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By far, I'd say my all around favorite development language has to be C++.

Features like operator overloading, in my opinion, give a fairly decent level of control. One particular area where it has been useful for me, was when I had to develop a portability library which reimplemented a few of the standard library functions and objects, including the string object, for this company I was working for last summer. The reason I had to develop the library was becase they were developing some code for these Arduino boards, but they wanted to test the code on a windows platform, and Arduino re-implemented many of the standard library functions and objects of the C/C++ language (and also removed many of them, such as exceptions). String operations in particular, were very different. They also needed a string object which could better handle storage of null characters within itself.I was able to write a rString class (replacement string), which could literally be dropped into the existing code with no problem, because I was able to use the function names they had been use to when developing on the Arduino platform, but I could also overload the operators they had been using. So without modifying the code (other than to basically find the word "String" and replace it with "rString"), we were able to convert all of our existing Arduino code to a more portable version of itself with minimal work required.

It goes without saying that having high level language features, like parametric polymorphism (templates), is a fantastic convenience, without sacrificing lower level features, like pointers, if you need them. It's the versatility of the language that really stands out to me as fantastic. Not to mention it's a write once, compile anywhere language, which means I can share my code with friends on different platforms with minimal hassle, usually.

I also have a lot of positive things to say about languages like C# and Java, scripting languages like Python (which I use literally all the time to automate parts of my physics homework), and of course I'm a fan of the web languages (Javascript for client-side programming, html5 for markup, CSS3 for styling, and PHP for server-side stuff). All things considered though, in the end, I think C++ will probably always be counted among my favorite languages, due to it's versatility as a language overall.
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Old December 1st, 2013 (11:55 AM).
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C is my language. For recreational programming, I mostly do Java and C++. But for my occupation, most of what I end up doing is C and assembly. Once every blue moon I'll actually get an assignment that requires C++.
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  #9    
Old December 15th, 2013 (8:27 PM).
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The classes I took focused around ASP/VB using Visual Studio, so that's what I've always used. I have enjoyed using it so far, but I don't have experience with anything else. I like being able to change the color layout so the background/font colors are easier on the eyes (never understood why black font on white background was chosen to be the default on all things computer)
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Old December 15th, 2013 (10:50 PM).
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Tbh I don't call myself a programmer, taking two years of programming in High School does not a programmer make.

But out of the two languages I did learn: C++ and Java, I prefer Java. Maybe because I learned it second, idk, I do remember though for C++ having to remember quite a bit of setup before beginning a program, like including iostream and stuff like that which always made me look back at previous programs because I forgot.
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  #11    
Old December 16th, 2013 (12:23 AM).
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C#, C# and C#.
And I love Visual Studio (yea, you cannot do C# in anything else but that's not the sole reason).
VS has everything in one little (ok, I'm joking here) BIG package and you can code everything there. (Java is stupid, so it's not there).
And with few add-ons you can even use it for PHP, Javascript and other non programming languages.
As for versions, I have 2012 Ultimate and 2013.


Btw... this thread is about languages or about based Visual Studio?
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  #12    
Old December 16th, 2013 (3:26 AM).
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Merged your thread since we already had a similar thread on developers/programming languages.

As a reminder, please be sure to use the search feature to make sure that topics you wish to create don't already exist. And if the topic you wish to discuss has been dead after one month, you are more welcome to create it again!
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  #13    
Old December 16th, 2013 (11:12 AM). Edited December 16th, 2013 by Corvus of the Black Night.
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I made a game in game maker but that doesn't count. I do like doing stuff in C# and Java but usually it's console based stuff and boring stuff that I use to either do my homework for me (lol) or calculate little things, or just weird gimmicky stuff. I'm sure I COULD make a game but I've gone so far in game maker that I really don't want to convert it all :p I gotta take the time to learn C++ but I've been a bum lately so yeah.

I HATE VISUAL BASIC WE DON'T TALK ABOUT THAT HERE. (okay I just hate the syntax but still)

I will technically be a literal developer in less than a month though, starting an apprenticeship at this web development company so yeah. that will be mainly javascript

edit: why does everyone wanna be game dev? :/
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  #14    
Old December 16th, 2013 (1:13 PM).
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Does an apprentice dev counts?

I can decently code in HTML5/CSS3 and I'm currently learning PHP and mySQL since I hope to be able to freely code and design a website, whether it be static or dynamic. After that, I think I may go to either Java or C# for game dev purposes this time.
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Old December 16th, 2013 (2:49 PM). Edited December 16th, 2013 by twocows.
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I have a degree in computer science. I prefer to do C, but sometimes, for more complex tasks or if time is an issue, I use C# or Python, as development is usually faster in those languages.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Roybrus View Post
By far, I'd say my all around favorite development language has to be C++.

Features like operator overloading, in my opinion, give a fairly decent level of control. One particular area where it has been useful for me, was when I had to develop a portability library which reimplemented a few of the standard library functions and objects, including the string object, for this company I was working for last summer. The reason I had to develop the library was becase they were developing some code for these Arduino boards, but they wanted to test the code on a windows platform, and Arduino re-implemented many of the standard library functions and objects of the C/C++ language (and also removed many of them, such as exceptions). String operations in particular, were very different. They also needed a string object which could better handle storage of null characters within itself.I was able to write a rString class (replacement string), which could literally be dropped into the existing code with no problem, because I was able to use the function names they had been use to when developing on the Arduino platform, but I could also overload the operators they had been using. So without modifying the code (other than to basically find the word "String" and replace it with "rString"), we were able to convert all of our existing Arduino code to a more portable version of itself with minimal work required.

It goes without saying that having high level language features, like parametric polymorphism (templates), is a fantastic convenience, without sacrificing lower level features, like pointers, if you need them. It's the versatility of the language that really stands out to me as fantastic. Not to mention it's a write once, compile anywhere language, which means I can share my code with friends on different platforms with minimal hassle, usually.

I also have a lot of positive things to say about languages like C# and Java, scripting languages like Python (which I use literally all the time to automate parts of my physics homework), and of course I'm a fan of the web languages (Javascript for client-side programming, html5 for markup, CSS3 for styling, and PHP for server-side stuff). All things considered though, in the end, I think C++ will probably always be counted among my favorite languages, due to it's versatility as a language overall.
C++ is awful. Rather than take several pages explaining why, I'll just link this, which does a better and more thorough job than I could do, anyway.

Generally speaking, there is always a better option than C++. If you are working at a low-level doing systems programming (e.g., embedded development, operating systems development), you should be using C. If you want higher-level constructs in C, use GLib and GObject. If future development isn't an issue, you can use D, which is basically C++ but not awful (and relatively obscure, so good luck finding other devs to maintain your D code). If you're doing pretty much anything else, you should be using a proper high-level language like C#, Python, Java, etc. "Being low-level" (or rather, low-level with a bunch of silly things that make bad assumptions to hide the fact that it is low level) is not an advantage unless you specifically require it, as is the case with the previous examples. Any other time and you're basically making your own life miserable with poor self-made implementations of what a lot of smart people already figured out how to automate much more efficiently. And as I said, C is my favorite language, so it's not as though I'm biased here, I love doing low-level, it's just not the right thing to do a lot of the time. Very rarely is performance going to be so much of a constraint that you have to be writing "low-level." A lot of people cite game development, which I'm not familiar with, but I believe even there, there are better tools for the job (XNA? using an already-existing engine/devkit? pretty much anything?).

There's basically one time you should ever be using C++, and that's when you're working on something that's already written in it. I can also kind of see the case for something like Qt, which hides a lot of the worse parts of C++. That said, even if you're maintaining C++ code, I would recommend at least considering something else (maybe C?) if you're going to do a separate addition (e.g., a new module or something).
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  #16    
Old December 17th, 2013 (3:22 AM). Edited December 17th, 2013 by Roybrus.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by twocows View Post
I have a degree in computer science. I prefer to do C, but sometimes, for more complex tasks or if time is an issue, I use C# or Python, as development is usually faster in those languages.


C++ is awful. Rather than take several pages explaining why, I'll just link this, which does a better and more thorough job than I could do, anyway.

Generally speaking, there is always a better option than C++. If you are working at a low-level doing systems programming (e.g., embedded development, operating systems development), you should be using C. If you want higher-level constructs in C, use GLib and GObject. If future development isn't an issue, you can use D, which is basically C++ but not awful (and relatively obscure, so good luck finding other devs to maintain your D code). If you're doing pretty much anything else, you should be using a proper high-level language like C#, Python, Java, etc. "Being low-level" (or rather, low-level with a bunch of silly things that make bad assumptions to hide the fact that it is low level) is not an advantage unless you specifically require it, as is the case with the previous examples. Any other time and you're basically making your own life miserable with poor self-made implementations of what a lot of smart people already figured out how to automate much more efficiently. And as I said, C is my favorite language, so it's not as though I'm biased here, I love doing low-level, it's just not the right thing to do a lot of the time. Very rarely is performance going to be so much of a constraint that you have to be writing "low-level." A lot of people cite game development, which I'm not familiar with, but I believe even there, there are better tools for the job (XNA? using an already-existing engine/devkit? pretty much anything?).

There's basically one time you should ever be using C++, and that's when you're working on something that's already written in it. I can also kind of see the case for something like Qt, which hides a lot of the worse parts of C++. That said, even if you're maintaining C++ code, I would recommend at least considering something else (maybe C?) if you're going to do a separate addition (e.g., a new module or something).
I certainly appreciate your perspective on this.

For me, it's still C++ all the way, for the reasons I described in my earlier post, but I'm a huge fan of C# and C as well. I totally get what you're saying about languages like C# and Java being a little easier to write in in some regards. They have a garbage collector, manage memory for you, and have objects to replace pointers (arrays and strings), although you can use pointers in C# if you mark the code as unsafe.

For the record, on my last job, the company I was with is in the process of switching from C# to C++ for the new navigation system that they're developing called Navi, so it is still in use outside of the video game industry.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

As far as visual studio goes, I've used it (mostly for C#), and I haven't had any problems with it. It seems like a perfectly fine IDE. It's a little bit on the expensive side, but there are tones of plugins for Visual Studio, and from what I've used, I like the built in features, like intellisense (though many other free IDEs also have similar auto-complete features). If you're planning to use C#, or maybe a BASIC language, I'd say it's among your best options. As other people have mentioned, there are also tones of languages that you can use with Visual Studio (Iron Python, Iron Ruby, F#, so on), so if you do like the IDE, then you can probably use it for a variety of different projects.

There are other options when it comes to C# (Mono), but certainly .NET is the most widely used version of it, I'd say. Overall, I think Visual Studio as a whole is pretty good.
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