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  #1    
Old August 22nd, 2012, 07:37 PM
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Well. Some of you know I've been homeschooled all my life.

After elementary, I was given a choice whether to go to a regular school like my other homeschooled friends, or stay homeschooled.

Well, I thought about it, real hard.

I decided that, I wasn't sure yet, but I'd like to take a few entrance exams from different schools.

I took one in one of the most expensive private schools in the country, and a public school, known for creating successful individuals, and a well-known private school near my area.

I passed all three.

Now, it was the point where I had to decide.

It helped me, that some of my friends who were homeschooled before, but transferred to regular school, school started early this year. In fact, two of them went to that public school I said earlier.

And there, I pretty much made my decision quite quickly. Although I'd do anything to be with those old friends of mine, I saw how they changed pretty fast

My first thoughts, were that they were being bullied. Apparently, no. They've become quite popular in their respective sections. Both were quite good academically, but not only that, they were good at sports.

But because they became popular, they joined the popular cliques. And being with popular people in school has a side-effect. In my country, we call rich-popular kids conyo, which in spanish means something quite vulgar, but in our language it means brat.

So these conyo kids sort of influenced them a lot.

Next, I started noticing that their grades were sort of flunking. But they didn't anymore seem to care. There was this one friend of mine who actually made me do her homework on several occasions.

They also seemed to ignore me a lot.

So that cleared all my hesitations, and decided to join a homeschool provider for high school.

It's pretty fun being able to sleep 14 hours a day every day, except on wednesday when the entire school had to go to our physical school and study together.

Our subjects are pretty much the same thing as with regular schooled students, math, english, science, history, etc. We have lab too, but it's way more fun than regular lab, because our science teachers are trained to simply make us have fun (there was this one time when we were supposed to set plants on fire and record what happened to the variables). The rest of the days, we study at home, when we like it. We're given weekly schedules which we have to accomplish. Best of all, if we fail our tests, our teachers give us second-shots at it.

Because of a huge amount of free time, I can do a lot of things. I'm part of an an orchestra, a rock band, I do digital art/drawing, coding, blogging, writing, and a whole lot of stuff. (Including pokecommunity )

If we ever need help at the stuff we're doing at home, our teachers are a skype call away.

In the end, I think I made a pretty good choice.

Now to the discussion part. Do you think regular school is overrated? Is homeschooling actually a good alternative to regular school, or are there other alternatives? Does the regular education system totally suck?

What is your opinion on this?
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Old August 22nd, 2012, 08:04 PM
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Yes.


Public school is really far from being the best way to education. Although most home-schooled children don't develop as much social skills as those who go to public school, they are still far better educated.
They also don't become douche-bags at home.

I go to public school, and last year on my Sophomore year in High School, nearly everyone I knew flunked, and no one seemed to care.
Public school may help social skills, but it also corrupts.
I have had friends since my grade school years, and I've seen them change over the years. Now most of them look like prostitutes, smoke, drink alchohol, and do very bad things.
Not only that, some teachers are really bad at teaching, and trust me, it's not the student's fault. At least not all the time.

There are some good students in public school, and anyone can succeed, but it'll take a large amount of effort, and it'll take tolerance.

I have a friend who was home-schooled and currently goes to online school, and he's by far, the smartest, nicest, most charming and mature dude I've ever met. He's nothing like those stupid male teenagers and prostitutes at public school.

To anyone who's choosing between public school and home school:

Go with home school. You won't get as much social skills, but that's what the internet's for. Also you'll save yourself from years of losing faith in humanity.
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Old August 23rd, 2012, 12:42 AM
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I totally agree with you. What's sad is that I am in public education too :(

Schools are great ways to get yourself corrupted. Yeah you get to study what you should (My school doesn't do that D:), but keep in mind that you are in the 21st century, an era were spoiled brats are publicized and were respectful and dignified people are dumped. I personally notice in my school, that there isn't any dedicated students at all, except for myself and a friend or two. The rest are ignorant, spoiled, lazy, corrupted and so on.

Heck smoking and weed is becoming a trend here! This is ridiculous! Bring us back the days were teachers were allowed to hit! Spoiled students are a recipe for disaster. What's worse is that parents themselves DO NOT exhibit punishment upon their children for flunking or ...doing anything wrong. On the contrary, when they see the school scolding their child for let's say vandalism...smoking...weed...or even behavior issues, the parents will go like "Woah woah! Leave my child alone! You have no right to scold or teach him that way! Let him do what he want!"

If those parents at least did the scolding and spanking themselves at home, then yes I might let them say that...but they don't! They just let their children get away with it! And you can guess that the results are a bunch of corrupted, ignorant, and influential losers of the society.....so sad
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Old September 1st, 2012, 06:47 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pokemon Trainer UV
Go with home school. You won't get as much social skills, but that's what the internet's for. Also you'll save yourself from years of losing faith in humanity.
As entertaining as it always is to see a young person like yourself already so jaded against the rest of humankind, I'm going to leave that one alone. That's between you and your public.

What I feel the need to take issue with is your notion that the Internet is an adequate substitute for the social skills you learn in an interactive environment. The Internet is a great tool for communication, but its invention does not mean it's OK to shun all other human contact. There are many, many social cues that you can only pick up on from being around other people. Probably the most important thing you learn is to think on your feet in natural person-to-person conversation so that when someone actually does talk to you, you can do more than stand there like an idiot with no idea what to say because you haven't been given enough time to think and type it out.

Life skills are what are taught at school - they're not taught in classes, they're taught by the trial-and-error game that is socialising. Human to human, without the need for a computer. Of course, school can lead you astray. If you are easily led, you can be taken down the garden path into smoking and drinking and... uh, prostitution I guess, but life is survival of the fittest. Staying at home and being sheltered from all of these things will just leave you that much less prepared when you actually are forced to go into the outside world.
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Old September 1st, 2012, 06:52 AM
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I've never really got why people seem to think that homeschooling is a good idea. I've met a few homeschooled people and, while they seemed alright, quite honestly two things ran through my mind. And that was that they were either awkward or they were boring. I just don't honestly see where the social interaction from basically never having to leave your home comes from. I know homeschooled people say that they go out places with their family or whatever but... that's not really social interaction in my book. That's just sheltering. That'd be the word I'd use for the way that I see homeschooling - "sheltered". Sure you get a one-on-one education and maybe you learn things better but is it really any use when you've been deprived of social interaction? "It's not what you know, it's who you know" is a saying that's very often shone true for me and through homeschooling you certainly know far fewer people because you're not in a learning environment with a lot of people. It's only logical.

Regarding these arguments about smoking, alcohol, how people "look like prostitutes", etc., I'd like to ask where exactly your statistics are that show that 100% of people in normal school do these things. I'd also like to ask why it's so inherently bad for kids to experiment with these things and what makes you better than them for not doing these things. I just see it as a situation of "if you don't want to do it then don't, otherwise it's not your business". Because honestly if it doesn't effect you then why should you care? If you really have an issue with it then find people like yourself, because trust me you aren't unique in the whole not drinking etc thing, and hang around with them. With homeschooling it's true that you're not exposed to the side of school that you don't like but you're also not exposed to like-minded people. Unless, of course, you go online for them, but that's not a solution really.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pokemon Trainer UV
Go with home school. You won't get as much social skills, but that's what the internet's for.
An online social life should be nothing but a supplement for your offline one, imo. When your only friends are online and your only social skills are online you're probably going to pale in comparison to someone who has grown up and developed around other people their age who know how to handle themselves face-to-face.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Charicific
Heck smoking and weed is becoming a trend here! This is ridiculous! Bring us back the days were teachers were allowed to hit! Spoiled students are a recipe for disaster. What's worse is that parents themselves DO NOT exhibit punishment upon their children for flunking or ...doing anything wrong. On the contrary, when they see the school scolding their child for let's say vandalism...smoking...weed...or even behavior issues, the parents will go like "Woah woah! Leave my child alone! You have no right to scold or teach him that way! Let him do what he want!"
You'd be alright with teachers disciplining children in that way? I... don't get that at all. A teacher's job is to, unsurprisingly, teach. Not do the parents' job for them. The parents you 'quoted' in this situation are absolutely right - teachers have no right to impose discipline upon someone else's children.
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Old September 1st, 2012, 07:26 AM
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Honestly I don't understand most of these arguments for home schooling in this thread. The reasons you've all given were because of the kid, not the way they were taught. If them of their parents didn't give a crap about what grades they get being at home whilst they're being taught won't make any difference to that.
Plus, as much as you can say about the internet and how that is enough for a social life, there are things you experience irl that you just can't do on the internet. If I hadn't gone to a school then I would've never learnt about other cultures or religions that I didn't learn about at school. Also, being in an area where you don't control who you interact with prepares you for real life and real jobs. If you spend most of your education controlling who you hang out with and who you interact with (in this case your friends) then when it comes to having an job in a few years time you'd have to learn how to put up with office idiot whereas everyone else will have been immunised to it through going to school with similar people to him/her.

Also these stereotypes about how all public students are "prostitutes" or "douche-bags" are very insulting if I'm honest. I wasn't home schooled and I was exposed to sex and drugs and violence, but I didn't turn into a douche-bag. Just because the people who misbehave shout loudest doesn't meant he decent public school students don't exist.

Quote:
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You'd be alright with teachers disciplining children in that way? I... don't get that at all. A teacher's job is to, unsurprisingly, teach. Not do the parents' job for them. The parents you 'quoted' in this situation are absolutely right - teachers have no right to impose discipline upon someone else's children.
I kind of agree here, but if one child is disrupting other children's opportunity to learn then action needs to be taken. I'm not saying they should be hit, just taken out of the room or something.
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Old September 1st, 2012, 07:34 AM
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Also, being in an area where you don't control who you interact with prepares you for real life and real jobs. If you spend most of your education controlling who you hang out with and who you interact with (in this case your friends) then when it comes to having an job in a few years time you'd have to learn how to put up with office idiot whereas everyone else will have been immunised to it through going to school with similar people to him/her.
This is a really good point which I missed. In the real world there's no "block" button or "away" status and you can't just go "offline" to avoid people. In the real world there are people you have to deal with, like it or not, and regardless of your education you need to be ready to deal with these people. Living your social life online isn't going to provide you with the skills to do that.

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I kind of agree here, but if one child is disrupting other children's opportunity to learn then action needs to be taken. I'm not saying they should be hit, just taken out of the room or something.
Oh, of course. What you mentioned would interfere with learning in the school and so yeah I'd be fine with stepping in there. I mean the teacher discipling for stuff outside of school like Charicific mentioned.
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Old September 1st, 2012, 08:10 AM
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I've never really got why people seem to think that homeschooling is a good idea. I've met a few homeschooled people and, while they seemed alright, quite honestly two things ran through my mind. And that was that they were either awkward or they were boring. I just don't honestly see where the social interaction from basically never having to leave your home comes from. I know homeschooled people say that they go out places with their family or whatever but... that's not really social interaction in my book. That's just sheltering.
Home-schooled people I've met turned out to be fully-functional, successful, independent adults; some I knew even managed to enter college well before their public-schooled peers. In fact, many home-schoolers I've met have become the adults that ask the brave questions of authority, exhibit the ability to peacefully resolve conflicts, and know how to build a community. Granted, I don't dispute the idea that any child coming from a public school can become that sort of person, I just don't think those things are taught by the public school.

There are all kinds of philosophies to base the curriculum you provide your child on, as well as there are social opportunities (I met plenty of home-schooled kids through high school as they were allowed to attend extra-curricular events, I even knew a girl that attended events specified to home-schoolers). It's about knowing your child and what's best for him/her, and I feel that the public school system here in the states is failing our youth (which is why I've set out to become an education reformer, but that's another story for another time) in regards to teaching fundamental life skills, a sense of personal integrity, and how to grasp the abstract aspects of reality. I personally wouldn't leave educating my child in the hands of public schooling; and this is coming from someone who has not only been taught by public schools, but has witnessed the effectiveness of some alternative types of educating, and has taught in various education systems.

This doesn't mean that home-schooling is the only viable option, but- from what I see in this thread's and the private school thread's responses- it doesn't seem like alternative forms of education are given a proper chance. If you look in the right places, there are many programs of study that show effective results. Montessori-style immediately comes to mind.
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Old September 1st, 2012, 08:31 AM
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I was in a normal public school my whole life until last year (Year 10) when I was diagnoised with School Phobia and became home-schooled

I am entering my Final school year on Wednesday and I am being home-schooled again.
I have to say Normal school is MUCH better.

Don't get me wrong Home-school has some perks.
Sleeping for longer, shorter days etc.

But normal school gives you the chance to enjoy everything with your friends and when you get to the final year like I am it is important to have to support of friends as this is the time I start my life. They need to be there for you and home schooling can make it harder for that to happen.

I am lucky to life in a small village so all my friends are a 30 minute walk so I still see them alot.

But in my opinion normal school is better.
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Old September 2nd, 2012, 12:07 AM
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Homeschool is a controlled environment.

After school you will be in an uncontrolled environment. You will have to face people you don't like, or bosses that are incompetent, or do tasks you don't want to. As well as just getting used to the daily grind of getting up, and going to work as a routine.

Whether you expose yourself to it now by going to a public school, or delay it by staying in homeschool won't change the social adversity you must learn to master eventually.


Going to school was one of the best times of my life, for the good and bad parts. Adversity helps us to grow. I wouldn't try and avoid it.

Last edited by Z_Z; September 2nd, 2012 at 12:13 AM.
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Old September 2nd, 2012, 07:06 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Razor Leaf View Post
I've never really got why people seem to think that homeschooling is a good idea. I've met a few homeschooled people and, while they seemed alright, quite honestly two things ran through my mind. And that was that they were either awkward or they were boring. I just don't honestly see where the social interaction from basically never having to leave your home comes from. I know homeschooled people say that they go out places with their family or whatever but... that's not really social interaction in my book. That's just sheltering. That'd be the word I'd use for the way that I see homeschooling - "sheltered". Sure you get a one-on-one education and maybe you learn things better but is it really any use when you've been deprived of social interaction? "It's not what you know, it's who you know" is a saying that's very often shone true for me and through homeschooling you certainly know far fewer people because you're not in a learning environment with a lot of people. It's only logical.
Seriously? Calling homeschooled kids boring and awkward is the same thing as stereotypicalizing public students as prostitutes.

Not all of us are boring and awkward.

Actually, if you meet homeschooled kids under homeschooling providers, most of them are irritating and quite random.

I disagree with homeschooling that isn't connected with a provider, because it's shutting yourself out of the world.

In my case, I use to go with a provider, but then I quit, and did independent homeschooling with my dad.

Instead of regular subjects like what i used to do in my homeschooling provider, I go around with him in his business meetings and stuff.

My dad teaches me mostly the skills of public speaking, writing, and investing in the stock market.

Although I probably might seem weird compared a "normal" kid, my weirdness is probably a good thing.

Being a "normal" kid who tries to do the "survival of the fittest" thing which the other poster said may make you stronger. But in my opinion, if you guys see homeschooling as being cooped up in your room studying, think again.

The way I see it, you guys are stuck in school every day.

I'm always out with my dad. As I said in my first post, I help out in two orchestras, and play in a rock band. I go to my dad's business meetings, and talk with his financial partners.

In my opinion, I don't think school is the real world. Rather, life after school is. And actually getting a handson, early experience in trying out different things because of our huge amount of free time, is just awesome.

Seriously. Just because we're different doesn't mean we're all boring, or awkward.

Also, on Hybrid Trainer's words (too lazy to quote),

Saying that we are being overprotected, that's true for some cases.

But seriously. You just need to find a proper homeschooling program, or if you have a parent like mine, go around the world with him/her.

We don't do tests. Just, no. We have to cope with real life problems instead. If you're tutor or parent is really good, they let you do things on your own.

You become a lot more independent, instead of relying on the normal philosophy, "Do as your told," which is taught in almost every regular school, and actually is teaching you to depend on the orders of people of higher positions. That's why there are more employees than entrepreneurs. They don't get to learn the mindset of entrepreneurs as easily.

So. What were you saying again? :3

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Old September 2nd, 2012, 10:43 AM
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Originally Posted by zephyr6257 View Post
Seriously? Calling homeschooled kids boring and awkward is the same thing as stereotypicalizing public students as prostitutes.

Not all of us are boring and awkward.

[...]

Seriously. Just because we're different doesn't mean we're all boring, or awkward.
That's why I said that the ones I've met were like that, lol. I didn't say that about all homeschooled kids at all but it's just the trend I've observed in my limited experience with it, and it's a trend which backs up my argument about social skills. I'm sorry you took it as me insulting all homeschooled kids, though, since I didn't mean that. Although...

Quote:
Originally Posted by zephyr6257 View Post
Actually, if you meet homeschooled kids under homeschooling providers, most of them are irritating and quite random.
I don't honestly see this as a good thing either and I'd class random under awkward.

Aside from that, having read your post, I'm still not convinced that homeschooling properly provides social skills. It sounds like you have a great relationship with your dad, which is awesome, but where's the social interaction? "public speaking, writing, and investing in the stock market" are not particularly useful social day-to-day skills. Sure, I'll give you that your playing in a rock band is a social thing, but a small one with a limited number of people. I just really feel that it's important for kids to be exposed to many people their age, not just a select few.

Quote:
Originally Posted by zephyr6257 View Post
You become a lot more independent, instead of relying on the normal philosophy, "Do as your told," which is taught in almost every regular school, and actually is teaching you to depend on the orders of people of higher positions.
I don't understand this. How does being taught one-on-one in a comfortable environment lead you to become independent? I've never really experienced the "do as you're told" philosophy which you speak of aside from when I've been messing around in classes and a teacher's told me to stop. For me, school was one of the huge things which made me independent - I got myself up every day, got myself ready for school, walked to school, dealt with both the good and bad people at school, worked to get help where I needed it, walked myself home from school and then got on with my evening. As far as extracurricular things like sports and music go, I got myself involved in them without any help from my parents or tutors, but through the school and through friends I made at school. With homeschooling you... get up, get taught, and that's it unless you go to the tutor's house. For other stuff you've got your parents or individual tutor behind you and I don't see where you learn to stand on your own two feet and get what you need like you do in normal schooling. There're no other people to deal with and there's no getting yourself to places on time (again, unless you go to the tutor's house). While, in the adult world, these are really little things, as a kid I felt they helped me mature and become independent. So I don't get how homeschooling makes you independent while normal schooling doesn't.
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Old September 2nd, 2012, 11:03 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zephyr6257 View Post
You become a lot more independent, instead of relying on the normal philosophy, "Do as your told," which is taught in almost every regular school, and actually is teaching you to depend on the orders of people of higher positions. That's why there are more employees than entrepreneurs. They don't get to learn the mindset of entrepreneurs as easily.
Just to add onto what razor leaf said, going to a regular school doesn't make you any less independent than if you were home schooled. If anything it makes you more independent because when you're home schooled you have one on one contact at all times, however in a regular school you have a good 30+ children to one teacher. In a regular school you can either wait around for an hour or two to maybe get the teachers attention and get help on whatever you're stuck on or you can get out there and work it out yourself. Get on a computer, get out a book, go to a library and research what the problem is and work out the solution on your own. If you're home schooled and have one on one teaching constantly there is no drive to get you to work out how to get the answer yourself and you're constantly relying on one person for all of your information.

Also jsyk, to entrepreneur you need money to get started which not a lot of people have. That's the reason there isn't many of them.
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Old September 2nd, 2012, 04:43 PM
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Originally Posted by Razor Leaf View Post

I don't understand this. How does being taught one-on-one in a comfortable environment lead you to become independent? I've never really experienced the "do as you're told" philosophy which you speak of aside from when I've been messing around in classes and a teacher's told me to stop. For me, school was one of the huge things which made me independent - I got myself up every day, got myself ready for school, walked to school, dealt with both the good and bad people at school, worked to get help where I needed it, walked myself home from school and then got on with my evening. As far as extracurricular things like sports and music go, I got myself involved in them without any help from my parents or tutors, but through the school and through friends I made at school. With homeschooling you... get up, get taught, and that's it unless you go to the tutor's house. For other stuff you've got your parents or individual tutor behind you and I don't see where you learn to stand on your own two feet and get what you need like you do in normal schooling. There're no other people to deal with and there's no getting yourself to places on time (again, unless you go to the tutor's house). While, in the adult world, these are really little things, as a kid I felt they helped me mature and become independent. So I don't get how homeschooling makes you independent while normal schooling doesn't.
Let me help you.

Sure, we get more attention from our parents/tutors.

But that doesn't mean we just go to them and learn, then eat and sleep.

Unless you're a rich kid who has 10 maids and doesn't do anything, your parents rely on you usually to do almost every single chore in the house.

And because of your ample free time, your ever over-zealous mother signs you up for 93801983419028341902348138109 extracurricular activities.

Next, most homeschooled kids don't have libraries where they can easily research. Most homeschoolers are poor, and live far away from the city where they can find books. Also, internet is slow for people who live far from the city, so opening wikipedia would take forever.

So they have to go around, usually by themselves (overzealous mom is on the phone, and busy dad is at work), and look for a way to research.

I'm lucky enough to have a totally different case, coming from a well-to-do family where we have a huge personal library in our other house.

But that doesn't mean I'm a lazy bum who relies on my mom for everything. For one thing, my family is the travelling type. They go around a lot. I usually opt to stay behind on trips, because I prefer doing my work by myself and studying random things when I'm bored(like the origin of pies, and documentaries of unicorns :3). My parents don't anymore arrange people to stay with me, or where I should stay with.

I pretty much have to go to a friends' house (most of my friends live far away, because i live in a quite secluded place, but still less than 15 minutes away from the country's capital), and crash there (about thaaat, my mom doesn't trust me with the house alone :3).

I have to bring all my books (I do 23 subjects. Because I want to.) and etc.

And I study by myself.

Seriously, even though my mom gets all the credit for being my teacher, she's usually doing another things. In fact, ever since high school, I can't remember a single day when she taught me. :l

Then, on your point of a small, limited amount of people to meet with? MEH.

That's definitely not the case for me. Seriously. Go find my identity and you'll figure.

Now, not all kids have my luck. But most homeschooled kids CAN join providers as I said. A good provider has at least 500++ students under them, all accredited by the country's education agency. They usually have a LOT of clubs, and a minimum of 2 field trips a quarter plus unofficial ones made by overzealous moms (i'm getting addicted to saying that lol) The students usually meet up at least once a week (in my old one, 3 times a week), but it's quite common that we don't study, instead, we just have fun.

I truly believe that homeschooling is a viable solution if you know your way around its system.
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Old September 2nd, 2012, 06:08 PM
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I think the topic of whether homeschooling is good enough for some people is pretty off-topic. The question is whether or not 'regular school' is overrated, not whether homeschooling is good enough. There are plenty of good, normally socialized and educated people that come out of homeschooling, and plenty of bad, asocial and ignorant people that come out of it, just like regular school. The focus of this thread should be whether non-homeschooling (or just public schools? Not sure what constitutes a 'normal school' here) is a viable education system.
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Old September 2nd, 2012, 11:25 PM
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It seems like you (threadstarter) don't plan on taking part of the rat race like most people and will either work for your dad and/or use his capital to run your own investments. So homeschool might work for you.

However most people don't get a choice and will work their way up from entry level positions. School is designed to prepare you for this, and it does so quite effectively. Also, highschool socialisation is NOT substitutable by taking part in extra-circular activities
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Old September 2nd, 2012, 11:37 PM
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Eh. Make opportunities. Isn't that what life is about?

Anyway, could you explain in depth why extra-curricular activities aren't social? :O I don't understand that.
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Old September 2nd, 2012, 11:58 PM
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They are social, but it is not an equivalent experience. You are meeting similar people with a common interest.

In highschool you are dealing with a much wider range of people, many of whom you would not normally spend any time with. It is a very different social environment.
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Old September 3rd, 2012, 05:44 AM
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I've never really got why people seem to think that homeschooling is a good idea.
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Honestly I don't understand most of these arguments for home schooling in this thread. The reasons you've all given were because of the kid, not the way they were taught. If them of their parents didn't give a crap about what grades they get being at home whilst they're being taught won't make any difference to that.

Also these stereotypes about how all public students are "prostitutes" or "douche-bags" are very insulting if I'm honest. I wasn't home schooled and I was exposed to sex and drugs and violence, but I didn't turn into a douche-bag. Just because the people who misbehave shout loudest doesn't meant he decent public school students don't exist..
I agree with everything quoted above.
Just because a public school has 'prostitutes' and 'douche-bags' doesn't make it a bad place. You will realise in your life, that these people are everywhere, regardless of where you go.

I would have hated to be home schooled.
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Old September 3rd, 2012, 05:50 AM
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I've been to public school, but now I am homeschooled. I was in public school up until 2nd grade where my teacher was telling the other kids to hit me. I know that most people don't have that kind of problem, but I did, so I quit public school. However, my mother is always a fan of overachievers and as a result I have 14 hour school days... Sometimes life sucks no matter what you do...

Also for all the people who say "what if the parent doesn't give a crap about their grades", if their parents didn't care, they would send them to public school. After all it's free daycare, right?
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Old September 3rd, 2012, 06:05 PM
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I agree with everything quoted above.
Just because a public school has 'prostitutes' and 'douche-bags' doesn't make it a bad place. You will realise in your life, that these people are everywhere, regardless of where you go.

I would have hated to be home schooled.
I never said public schools were a bad place o-o It's just not in me to go to one.
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Old September 6th, 2012, 11:45 AM
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Just wanted to add my two cents in here.

As someone that regularly attended public school, and for someone that has dealt with both the good and the bad sides, I can definitely see that public schooling would give....at least, in my own opinion, your own experience of what the world is going to be like. Not saying that homeschooling doesn't in any sense(not that I would have a specific opinion on homeschooling anyway since I haven't met anyone that was homeschooled), but...through my experience in public school, I learned the hard way that no one is going to like you. That's...most obvious lesson #1.

Another thing is that....the teachers. Of course, the teachers. Sure, I've had a fair few bad ones when I was at school, but there were some good ones, too! Like...there were those instructors that just kept pushing me and pushing me to do my absolute best when I wasn't really pushing myself hard enough due to my own low self-esteem. I learned then and there that, even when there's no one around to keep pushing me to do things, I have to learn to push myself.

...I'm not really going to get into too much detail with my schooling life for the sake of staying on the topic, but let's just say that, public schooling gave me the experience to deal with others the way that I could today. Sure, I have Anxiety. Sure, I get really nervous about people, still. But I'd rather have the Anxiety and try to overcome it, by making good friends and hanging out with them a lot more often, rather than to miss those opportunities due to being homeschooled.

Now I understand that, due to my lack of knowledge of homeschooling, you're free to slap me here and there for that last sentence, but being at home a majority of the time, just doesn't do it for me. I'm the person that takes making memories seriously, and I like making those memories with other people, whether I'm in class or participating in clubs, I like to make those moments memorable, in a sense. Being social is a really important aspect of me, it was something that I kind of took for granted in High School, as such I've made it kind of a thing to be as involved as possible in college.

The best and the worst moment of my life was when I graduated High School. It was the best time of my life because I graduated and was well on my way to college. It was the worst moment of my life because I missed my chance to interact with so many people because I was so shy, and I always kept to myself. And I had to deal with the painful consequence of never seeing my high school classmates again, I had to deal with the painful consequences of not making as many memories as I could've.

I mean, this is all of what public schooling has done for me. Social values are damn well important and I'm not taking my chances in missing them.


But that's enough from me, lol. Just wanted to give my perspective on things.

Last edited by Twilight Sky; September 6th, 2012 at 11:55 AM.
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Old September 9th, 2012, 06:24 AM
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Just to add, whilst it is great that you are a motivated learner there are plenty of people who are homeschooled and really don't want to learn - or don't have someone who has enough knowledge, resources or time to help them.

Schools not only offer qualified teachers who (mostly) know what they're talking about but also offers books, computers, peers and a community to help you get through education. As others have mentioned before me, schools are great for learning to deal with people who you would normally avoid.

With regards to the thread title I would say that schools are, in fact, underrated. From my experience the majority of <16 year olds despised school, and would have loved to have a nice sleepy day at home 'learning' from wikipedia - post 16 though (Sixth Form/College age in the UK) we're always talking about the great times we had and my class changed dramatically in terms of respect to the teachers.

Basically, kids just hate going to school, which is why it gets such a bad rap and people think that homeschooling is an appropriate alternative.

(Which it sometimes is, but true parent-child homeschooling should not be the norm).
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Old September 9th, 2012, 07:34 AM
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I don't think it's overrated, just painfully traditional and way too controlling.

I went to charter school for elementary and absolutely loved it. Uniforms, small classrooms, only about 75 students per grade. It was really nice.

Then, I transferred to public school for seventh grade... Living hell. Teachers weren't nearly as engaging, and everything felt black and white lifeless. It was more of an institution than a school.

I homeschooled myself for junior and senior years of high school, and actually really enjoyed that time. My teachers were practically nonexistent (everything was online) so I really had the chance to do everything myself. Schedule my curricula at whatever pace I wanted, spend as much or as little time on whichever classes I needed to, without the non-academic pressures of other students and classroom environments or situations.

I'm in college now, though, and wouldn't do online schooling for this. College is something that is really different from K-12 as you have so much more freedom and independence.

If you're doing online classes in college, to me that's really from sloth rather than wanting to engage yourself independently, unless you live like 20 miles from campus and don't want to do/can't afford dorms.
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Old September 9th, 2012, 08:21 PM
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Regular school as in the traditional waking up, getting ready for school, driving / walking / other form of transportation to school, getting there, going to classes, and then coming home? Or regular school as in public school? I don't find either to be overrated. For many, public school is necessary. Most families in most countries can't afford to send their children to a private school. While some public schools aren't very good, there are plenty more that are. Because of the financial situation for most people, I don't think it's overrated at all.

Traditional school in the first sense, I don't find to be overrated either. I have been homeschooled before, and I have to say, it wasn't as great as I would have hoped for. I did it for nearly a year during high school before going back (and being far behind on my work required to graduate) so I had to make up the work and classes that I missed that were required of me to graduate when I came back. Homeschooling offers tremendous flexibility, but it also seems to give you added responsibility.

A lot of people need to be in a classroom environment in order to learn effectively. Being in one of those allows you to learn not just what you're required to learn in text, but learn from other students, which many teachers in smaller colleges (to what I've experienced) value that kind of learning more than lectures. High school traditionally prepares students for college as well using required assignments to solidify a basic outline on how to properly do your work in college to get decent grades, whether or not your college professor requires you to do it or not. Properly outlining chapters, building vocabulary, etc. It's all very important, and in most home schooling classes, they don't assign those types of assignments.

If you don't have the self-control to focus your time on your schoolwork, getting distracted is very easy, especially in this day and age where most homeschooling for most children is done on the computer. Most teenagers can't motivate themselves to self learn, and that's ultimately what homeschooling has started to become. Additionally, like others have brought up, the lack of social interaction with your peers (unless you're a member of a support group of sorts where homeschooled students get together and hang out) can really get you down. We need social interaction, and while you can be perfectly content with sitting behind the computer and doing all of your social interaction that way, that isn't very healthy for your self-esteem and tends to damage it in the long run, unless you're very strong mentally and emotionally to be able to handle that.

Though, if you can find a way to get regular interactions in with people your age, then that point is rather moot. Since it wouldn't be that hard to go out and meet with a friend or talk to them at least once a day through means other than media outlets.
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