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The Pokémon Q/A Compendium

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Old November 12th, 2009 (6:16 PM). Edited November 14th, 2009 by The Scientist.
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SECTION 0: INTRODUCTION TO THE COMPENDIUM
As promised in the greatest thread in all of PC history, here is a massive compendium of some commonly and uncommonly-asked questions regarding Pokémon. The original thread became a bit slow and cluttered, so this is an attempt to keep everything together in one neat place.

The Compendium will always be a work in progress; this post will be updated whenever new questions or information arise.

Most of these questions were taken from the Guru thread, so credit for the answers goes mostly to the people who were active there (Inkfingers, templekeeper, Niprop, and most of the people in my sig). Note that the answers to these questions were derived through a combination of physics, biology, and logic, so some degree of scientific understanding may be necessary when browsing the answers. For convenience' sake, all of the questions are currently divided into 6 categories, which you should see below as Sections I-VI.

With the introduction out of the way, there are two things to keep in mind when going through the Compendium:

1) If you have a question that isn't listed here, or a better-fitting answer, get it to me in some form and it will be included here.

2) While a lot of facts are used and referenced, a lot of this is theory.

SECTION I: THE POKÉMON WORLD
Spoiler:

What defines a Pokémon?
Spoiler:
A simple question with a difficult answer: when one considers that possessed dolls, space viruses, and digital coding can be classified as a Pokémon, things get a bit complicated.

Therefore, it is best to list some criteria that a Pokémon must fill.
In order to be a Pokémon, the thing in question must obey at least 3 of the following:
  • Must be a sentient being who has properties that correspond to predefined elemental types.
  • Must be able to learn attacks and moves that correspond to a defined list of moves.
  • Must be able to breed with other Pokémon, obeying the Egg Grouping laws.
  • Must be a direct biological descendant of Arceus.

Therefore, while a human may be able to learn Scratch and could be classified as a Normal type, they cannot breed with Pokémon and are not biologically descended from Arceus.

Porygon, although artificially created, does meet 3 of the criteria.

At first, Deoxys only seems to fit the first two criteria, but as a confirmed Pokémon, one can conclude that the DNA that composes the deoxyvirus that is Deoxys must have been derived from Arceus in some way.


Where does Pokémon take place?
Spoiler:
Pokémon takes place in a world parallel to our own: there are ingame references to the Pacific Ocean, the United States, South America, China, and Russia. The regions in which the games/anime/manga take place are parallels to parts of Japan (with one exception).


  • Kanto :: Kanto, Japan
  • Johto :: Kansai, Japan
  • Hoenn :: Kyushu, Japan
  • Orre :: Arizona, USA
  • Sinnoh :: Hokkaido, Japan
  • Almia :: Hokkaido peninsula, Japan


What's the unit of currency in the Pokémon world?
Spoiler:
Pokémon Dollars/PokéDollars (symbol ). The name was given in Pokémon Colosseum (and I think it was also mentioned in Gale of Darkness). Interesting to note that in the Japanese games, the Yen symbol (¥) is used.


Do non-Pokémon animals exist?
Spoiler:
In the anime, yes. Fish, worms, and a dog have been spotted. Ash dresses up in a cow [not Miltank] costume in one episode.



In the games, the answer is seems to be "no". The only non-Pokémon life outside of humans and plants is PokéRus, which is described as a microscopic organism. However, it is argued that non-Pokémon animals do exist ingame since PokéDex entries reference real animals (Tentacool is called the Jellyfish Pokémon, which would imply that there are normal jellyfish floating around that Tentacool was be compared to).


Who is the ancestor of Pokémon: Mew or Arceus?
Spoiler:
Both: here's the chain of creation.

1) Arceus→ First Pokémon to appear in the primordial universe.
2) Dialga/Palkia/Giratina→ Created time, space, and a parallel dimension.
3) Groudon/Kyogre/Rayquaza/Regigias→ Created the Earth.
4) all other Legendaries (excluding Mew)→ Stabilized the Earth, got natural processes running and under control.
5) Mew→ Common ancestor to all non-Legendary Pokémon.
6) All fossil Pokémon→ Divergence of Egg Groups.
7) All modern Pokémon→ Run around and do stuff.


Do people eat Pokémon?
Do Pokémon eat other Pokémon?
Spoiler:
From the game perspective, yes. This is referenced by multiple Pokédex entries:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wurmple's Sapphire Entry
Wurmple is targeted by Swellow as prey. This Pokémon will try to resist by pointing the spikes on its rear at the attacking predator. It will weaken the foe by leaking poison from the spikes.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gorebyss' Emerald Entry
A Gorebyss siphons the body fluids of prey through its thin, tubular mouth. Its light pink body color turns vivid when it finishes feeding.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pidgeot's Blue Entry
When hunting, it skims the surface of water at high speed to pick off unwary prey such as Magikarp.
As far as humans go, the only mention of Pokémon and food is in Canalave Library:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sinnoh Folk Tale #1
Pick clean the bones of Pokémon
caught in the sea or stream.
Thank them for the meals they
provide
, and pick their bones clean.
The Veilstone Myth also mentions Pokémon being eaten.

From the anime perspective, the answer is unclear. There are many examples of people eating, but there are apparently non-Pokémon animals that inhabit the world and are used for food. After the exchange with James' Magikarp and Meowth, It is implied that humans can/will eat Pokémon in times of desperation, though.


What happens to a wild Pokémon after you battle it?
Spoiler:
Nothing. It lays in the grass and recovers. Remember that when attacked by a wild Pokémon, it is the Pokémon that takes the initiative to attack you, not the other way around. If the Pokémon is weak and thus not interested in attacking, you won't "find" it.


SECTION II: POKÉMON TECHNOLOGY
Spoiler:

How do PokéBalls work?
Spoiler:


Contrary to popular belief, Pokémon are not converted into energy when recalled to a PokéBall. Energy used colloquially can mean two things: plasma and EM waves. The former would take up more space than the original Pokémon (although something like Rotom is a possible exception), while the latter can't be stored in any form.

The best explanation is that the Pokémon are digitized. This theory is directly supported by the fact that the Pokémon world does have the technology necessary to convert matter into data and vice versa (PC Pokémon/Item storage system, "Electric Soldier Porygon").

Every PokéBall has a serial number. When a Pokémon is captured and digitized for the first time, a copy of that serial number is imprinted onto it. PokéBalls are built so that they cannot capture anything except the Pokémon that has its imprinted code.

For example, say you have a PokéBall with a serial number of SD000000001, and you catch a Natu with it. Natu is now imprinted with its PokéBall's serial number. If you try to catch or recall another Pokémon with Natu's PokéBall, it won't work because the embedded serials don't match up. If another PokéBall (with a different serial number) is used on your Natu, it won't work for the same reason.

Snag Balls override the serial number check.


If PokéBalls rely on digitization and advanced technology, how do things like the Giant Spoon or Ancient PokéBall work?
Spoiler:
One possibility is that Pokemon have always had the inherent ability to turn into data, and that this change is triggered by a particular substance/radiation. Modern technology, data encryption type and all, was reverse-engineered from Pokemon like Metagross, which are described as being walking supercomputers.

If that were the case, any object could recall a Pokémon assuming that it emitted the proper frequency.

Modern PokéBalls have a few perks that older items didn't: an item storage system for Hold Items and automatic PokéBall SN/Trainer ID embedding.


Why don't PokéBalls capture people?
Spoiler:
PokéBalls are manufactured with a fail-safe device. Each Ball is imprinted with a copy of the basic human genome (it's only 20MB) with a clause that basically says "DO NOT CAPTURE THIS".


Why can't you capture a KO'ed Pokémon?
Spoiler:
Would you want to capture this?



To prevent Trainers from going overboard and causing widespread wild Pokémon abuse via overkill, PokéBalls will not activate on a seriously injured Pokémon.


Why do Trainers need to use trading machines?
Spoiler:
IN PROGRESS


How do TMs work?
Spoiler:
Considering that all Pokémon are descendants of one common ancestor (Mew, or Arceus if you're talking about Legendaries), an ancestor that had the ability to become any type, modern Pokémon may have vestigal or inactive poison/electric/flame/whatever production glands. TMs take the form of a CD, which may correspond to the relationship between Pokémon and digital data; the TM activates mental instructions of how to use these newly-recognized organs. An analogy is that a camera attached to a computer won't be recognized and will remain useless until the proper driver is installed.


How can a device (Pokétch) measure how much a Pokémon likes you?
Spoiler:


Like "Link Power" in MegaMan Starforce, or the human-daemon bond in The Golden Compass, when two beings form an emotional bond a physical "link" is formed, the strength of which is influenced by how well the beings know each other and get along. This link could be composed of brainwaves or some other form of subtle energy, but the device in question has been built to pick up on it.


SECTION III: QUESTIONS RE. SPECIFIC POKÉMON
Spoiler:

What are Entei, Suicune, and Raikou?
Spoiler:
They have traits of the big cats, but some canine properties can be seen in them. Their proper title is "Legendary Beasts". The confusion arose with one of the initial English translations, which erroneously called them "Dogs".


Is Arcanine/Chimecho/Lucario/Rotom a Legendary Pokémon?
Spoiler:
"Legendary Pokémon" is a general term that contains three categories: Pokémon of Myth, Pokémon of Mirage, and Pokémon of Legend.

Pokémon of Myth refer primarily to the Legendary Pokémon of Sinnoh that existed before the world.
Pokémon of Mirage refers to extremely rare, elusive Pokémon, like Mew, Latios/Latias, and Jirachi
Pokémon of Legend refer to Pokémon that have strong historical legends associated with them, such as Groudon, Kyogre, and Regigigas.

All three types of Legendary Pokémon appear to have something in common, though: they are classified as Pokémon that were responsible for the creation of the world and universe and/or controlling natural phenomena (volcanic eruptions, wind, thunderstorms, dreams, human qualities, etc).

Many Pokémon have legends associated with them (and are thus legendary), but this is different from the classification of a Legendary (note the capitalization) Pokémon. The only known exception to this is Deoxys, which is classified as a Legendary simply because of its insanely high power levels. Following this taxonomy, Arcanine/Chimecho/Lucario/Rotom are not Legendary Pokémon, but could be legendary (Arcanine and Lucario in particular).


What is Ditto?
Spoiler:


Ditto is similar to slime mold, but is composed entirely of stem cells. Stem cells are blank, unspecialized cells that can be modified through certain triggers. When exposed to pheromones from a target Pokémon, the stem cells react by evolving, using the data on the pheromones as a template. Once a Ditto has copied a Pokémon once, it can recreate that Pokémon at will in the future entirely from memory.

Ditto's ability to turn into nonliving objects implies that its control over its body may extend to a molecular/atomic level. In this instance, a Ditto will turn into the object based solely on its appearance. Knowledge of how the object works will help the Ditto's transformation.

As a Ditto transforms into more and more things, it gains an understanding of how living and nonliving things are structured and function, opening up a realm of freeform transformations.

Cell memory is responsible for Ditto's ability to copy moves. Just as human memories seem to be transferrable through organ transplants, traces of an attack that a Pokémon learns are stored in cell memory. When Ditto copies an enemy, it modifies its pseudo-stem cells to "evolve" based on the target's appearance and/or pheromones. If pheromones are involved, Ditto will get bits of cell memory that it can use to "learn" attacks.


What is Porygon?
Spoiler:

The reason why Porygon is tangible is due to the same matter-to-data conversions that are used in PokéBalls. The programing code is basically Porygon's equivalent to DNA, which not only controls the matter around it in order to form Porygon's physical body, but also dictates Porygon's actions, emotions, intelligence, etc. This means that Porygon can't manifest itself straight from the virtual world into the "real" world in places with insufficient matter, such as vacuums.

Porygon seems to also have the ability to convert matter into the energy used to fuel it, though since it's artificial it doesn't necessarily need to eat.

Since Porygon's body is nothing more but it's corporeal form, Porygon is able to withstand many things that would be fatal to even powerful pokémon such as Mewtwo, as it's ethereal form (it's coding) cannot be harmed in the physical world, allowing it to completely regenerate it's entire body even if it's seemingly vaporized, so long as it has sufficient energy to do so (it's body is also very flexible despite it's appearance, as shown by Porygon2 when it's hit by an attack in Pokémon Mystery Dungeon.)

In the virtual realm, however, Porygon is not quite as invulnrable. Although it's able to do many things it couldn't normally do outside it's cyber habitat (such as grow to massive proportions, fire powerful attacks and move at blinding speeds), it is here where it's also possible to destroy it's coding.


How does Deoxys change forms?
Spoiler:
Deoxys (being a virus) has fragile, easily-corruptable D/RNA. Strong radiation from the Veilstone meteorites causes a corruption at a specific locus in the D/RNA, similar to how UV radiation can cause corruptions (cancer) in human DNA. Since DNA is the blueprint for our physical form, an alteration in Deoxys' D/RNA would cause it to physically mutate.


How do composite Pokémon like Slowpoke/Beldum/Magnemite/Diglett/etc. evolve if there are no proper Pokémon around?
Spoiler:
Diglett/Dugtrio is a similar but separate case. Unlike the other Pokémon listed here, it splits into three and is not a fusion of multiple Pokémon.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dugtrio's R/S Entry
Dugtrio are actually triplets that emerged from one body. As a result, each triplet thinks exactly like the other two triplets. They work cooperatively to burrow endlessly.
Dugtrio aside, these Pokémon cannot evolve if their companions are not present: they can only evolve when the other required Pokémon are nearby, not the other way around (i.e. they do not spontaneously evolve and the Shellder/Beldum/Magnemite/etc. appear afterwards).

However, when the Pokémon is ready to evolve they most likely send out pheromones, telepathic messages, or even sounds to attract the Pokémon necessary for their evolution.

The anime goes supports both sides of the argument. While the electric farmer's Magnemite #007 only evolved when other Magnemite were around, and Slowpoke only evolved when a Shellder bit it, the Beldum in this episode splits in two to form a Metang.



How does Snorlax move on land when it is so fat?
Spoiler:
Snorlax is built like a sumo wrestler: not only carrying lots of fat, but also extremely thick bones and extremely powerful muscles. Believe it or not, the bulk of Snorlax' weight comes from bone and muscle (which are both more dense than fat).


How does Geodude work?
Spoiler:
Ground-types, having domain over the Earth (referenced by their ability to use moves like Earth Power and Magnitude through sheer willpower), are gifted with gravity-related abilities as well. By negating the effect of gravity on its body, it just... floats there. By shifting its balance, it can control where it drifts, and there are even situations where Geodude doesn't float at all.


Why does Feebas evolve through PokéBlocks/Poffins?
Spoiler:
Feebas' evolution is entirely psychological: it evolves when it feels confident and beautiful. Due to the lack of outside influence, wild Feebas (who are, by nature, miserable little creatures) are unlikely to ever meet this requirement. The unusual properties of Poffins/Pokéblocks make this condition more easily met. It is possible that Berries have mild psychoactive agents in them, agents that are amplified during the processing procedure of Pokéblocks/Poffins. In a way, you're medicating Feebas' depression with candy, a concept that is similar to chocolate's serotonin-boosting abilities.


How does Kecleon turn invisible?
Spoiler:
Kecleon does not become invisible. Instead, it turns its body surface into a picture of what's behind it. All of the cells on its body (except its stripe) are like octopus cells, in that they contain small pigment alteration sacs. When Kecleon sees something, it can consciously control the pigment release in its skin to mimic the environment. Chameleons have a 360 field of vision, so it can alter its skin-image (imitate parallax) in real-time based on the perspective of its viewers.


What is the relationship between Shellder and Slowpoke?
Spoiler:
The Shellder partially evolves, resulting in a larger, spiked Shellder. This Shellder acts as a counterweight, allowing Slowpoke to stand upright and use moves like Mega Punch: Slowbro is better able to move around and defend itself, while Shellder gets a constant source of nutrition (Slowbro's blood). If the Shellder should detach somehow (probably against their will), the Slowbro will keep its evolved body, but its intelligence will drop and it will revert to walking on all fours. The Shellder will remain in its spiked form, and can still evolve into a Cloyster.

Slowbro and Slowking's intelligence are attributed to the attached Shellder's venom. This may actually have some basis- besides acting as anti-inflammatory agents, venom can be used to kill cancer cells.

Like Alakazam, Slowpoke may have a constantly growing brain- a brain that grows so quickly that it could be considered cancerous. This kind of pressure on the inside of the skull usually results in mental retardation. Shellder's venom controls these cancerous regions, reducing the pressure on Slowpoke's brain and thus allowing it to think more clearly? When the Shellder moves to Slowbro's head, its venoms are able to be more effectively delivered, relieving the pressure completely and allowing Slowking to use his brain to its full potential.

On a related note, there are sources that discuss a sea snail whose venom targets the brain.


Where does Kadabra's spoon come from?
Spoiler:
The Spoon is generated as the Abra evolves; it will turn any nearby metal into a spoon for its use. The spoon is used to store excess psychic powers (note that Alakazam, who is stronger, gains another Spoon). However, the Spoon is still connected to Kadabra's internal energy supply, which is why if a Kadabra loses its spoon, its psychokinetic powers are weakened.


Where do Hitmonchan's/Machoke/Machamp's clothes come from?
Spoiler:
Hitmonchan's gloves and Machoke's/Machamp's control belt are made and distributed by humans to help them control their ridiculous physical powers; before any sort of human interference, Hitmonchan/Machoke/Machamp didn't have the garments.

Due to their love of challenges and fighting, these Pokémon tend to instinctively seek out dojos and training gyms, places that will most likely have the gear they need.

If a person were to catch a Machop/Tyrogue and evolve it, the clothes are obtained a bit differently. PokéBalls maintain a link to the Pokédex, and upon recognition of a Machop/Tyrogue, the clothes will be sent directly to the item storage system in the PokéBall (PokéBalls contain a small partition for item data, usually used for attached Hold Items). The data for the clothes will be embedded in the Pokémon until it evolves.


Where do other Humanshape Pokémon (Jynx, Gardevoir, etc.) get their clothes?
Spoiler:
As these clothes are not made by humans for safety purposes, it is unclear who makes them. Since these Pokémon are similar to humans, they may try to copy them by making and wearing clothes as well.

Spoiler:
An equally-plausible explanation is that these Pokémon are not wearing clothes at all, they just LOOK like they are.


How many wings/feet do Crobat have?
Spoiler:
Crobat has two vestigal feet and four wings (the latter two were derived from Golbat's legs).



How can a person ride a Rapidash without being burned?
Spoiler:
What appears to be flames is actually a very thick mane, made of hairs that are colored and move in a way that emulates fire, most likely to intimidate enemies. However, as a Fire-type it is able to channel heat energy to them, the same way a lightbulb filament heats up when an electrical current is passed through it.


How/why is Magikarp still alive?
Spoiler:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Some blog
If a species has no traits that help it survive, it has no evolutionary advantage and it dies. In other other words, the weak die. In other other other words, WHY IS MAGIKARP NOT EXTINCT?

Go Magikarp go!

Firstly, while they are weak as Pokémon, they're pretty sturdy animals. Their scales are extremely strong, and their thrashing about can be dangerous. Magikarp can be found in every body of water to date, hinting at a high degree of adaptability. The fact that Magikarp is always available (as opposed to appearing in swarm) implies that Magikarp leave large clutches of eggs all year round, which ensures that there will be at least one Gyarados to continue the bloodline. In places like the Lake of Rage, Gyarados may also play a role in protecting Magikarp schools.


How does Pikachu (or any other organic Electric Pokémon) generate so much electricity?
Spoiler:
When you assume that the bulk of its ranged "electrical" damage is actually delivered via charged plasma, things become a bit more plausible. According to various Pokédex entries, the electricity is accumulated naturally and rapidly (even to the point where the Pikachu has to discharge the excess or die). Now electric eels have specialized cells called electrocytes that can generate massive potential differences, up to around 600V. Pikachu most likely has super-efficient electrocytes, the bulk of which are located in its cheeks.


SECTION IV: POKÉMON TYPING AND ATTACKS
Spoiler:

How do Normal Pokémon use weather-changing moves?
Spoiler:
As "supernatural" beings, Normal-type Pokémon generate a large amount of "life force/energy", more than any other Pokémon type except Dragon. This massive internal energy store a) can be fired in the form of a Hyper Beam, b) can be used to charge the muscles for powerful physical moves, and c) gives them resistance to the death-based Ghost moves.

Directing an energy pulse upward would burn a hole through the cloud layers, resulting in brighter-than-normal sunlight. Directing it outward would result in a massive condensation burst that would ultimately trigger rain.


How can Water Pokémon generate so much water without storing it in their bodies?
Spoiler:
In the Colosseum games, water moves like Hydro Pump have a brief charging period where particles from the air are drawn in. Instead of storing supercompressed water in their bodies, they simply compress water vapor in the air. This explains why Water moves are stronger in rain and weaker during Sunny Day: the availability of water changes.

It should be impossible/extremely difficult for water Pokémon use water moves in a severely dry environment.


How do moves like Sing and Grasswhistle work?
Spoiler:
Sing and Grasswhistle do not derive their effects from the notes sung, but from infrasonic frequencies hidden in the "song".

Infrasonic frequencies are the levels of sound too low to hear. Humans show unusual physical symptoms when exposed to specific infrasonic frequencies, particularly 7.16Hz (the infamous "Brown Note", causes nausea) and 14.0Hz (causes irrational anxiety). The two aforementioned sleep moves utilize an infrasonic frequency that causes drowsiness. This results in multiple Pokémon being able to access these moves although they use different songs.


Why are electric attacks so slow? Shouldn't they move at the speed of light?
Spoiler:
The electricity fired does move at the speed of light, and is nearly invisible. What is happening is that this electricity tears apart the atoms in the air, creating a glowing plasma. This electrically-charged plasma flows through the ionized channel created by the initial "beam" of electricity. Therefore the damage dealt is a less the electricity itself and more the electrically-charged plasma that reaches the target soon after. Attacks like Spark and Thunderpunch are visible on the same principle.


Why are Psychic/Dark/Ghost types effective/immune/resistant to certain types?
Spoiler:
The relationship among these Pokémon is best explained by understanding some of their properties and defining characteristics.
  • Psychic types can faintly read their opponents' minds and predict how and where they will strike. As such, they can brace for the impact, reducing the damage; this lowered damage is the "normal" to them. Psychic Pokémon also are psychologically and spiritually sensitive.
  • Dark types are defined by "evil" traits (deception, intimidation, and brutality), and as such have a menacing aura that surrounds them. This aura is potent enough to be damaging if released (Dark Pulse). This aura is also enough to slightly intimidate Pokémon in proximity, reducing their attacking strength.
  • Ghost types are similar in nature to Dark types, malevolent and mischevious. However, they also have a high degree of spiritual sensitivity like the Psychics.

Psychic Pokémon are weak against Dark types because of their spiritual sensitivity. When attacking, Dark types use their aura to boost the strength of their moves, adding a psychological component to the damage. This dark aura is strong enough to completely overwhelm and stifle the Psychic's abilities, weakening their defenses and causing them to take more damage than usual. Psychics are weak against Ghosts for similar reasons. Bug types have such unusual, scattered thought processes that the Psychics can't predict their movements and prepare themselves, and they therefore take more damage.

Dark is immune to Psychic because their malevolent aura stifles the Psychic Pokémon's abilities.

Ghost Pokémon are weak against Dark types for reasons similar to the Psychics: their spiritual sensitivity makes them vulnerable to the dark aura. However, their own mischevious tendencies allow them to attack unhindered.

Dark Pokémon are weak against Fighting types because Fighting Pokémon also have an inherent tendency: bravery. They aren't intimidated by the Dark types' wiles, and in fact will probably see that intimidation as a challenge. Therefore, they strike at stronger-than-normal power. Dark types are weak against Bug for the same reason that Bugs are effective against Psychics: the Bugs don't pick up the subtle dark aura, and therefore strike with normal power.


How do Psychic Pokémon moves work?
Spoiler:
Psychic Pokémon have increased the power of their alpha brainwaves, which have strange electromagnetic properties. They can push and pull things, which is the basis of all psychic moves. Reflect, for example, is a constant pushing aura of psychokinetic force, while Extrasensory alternates between pushing and pulling to inflict pain and damage.


How do fish Pokémon, like Quilfish and Lanturn, battle out of water?
Spoiler:


See 1:32 - 2:01.

Non-fish Water Pokémon have no problems on land, with exceptions like Gyarados (which has a mystical dragon aspect to it).

In the games, to prevent Trainers from being limited, no feature was implemented to reference fish Pokémon survival on land... although the Stadium/Colosseum games will have them floating in midair.


Why isn't there a Light type?
Spoiler:
Light-type used in this sense could either mean true light (photon streams) or "good, angelic" (as an opposite to the Dark/Evil-type).

Regarding true light, light moves are currently represented by Steel (Flash Cannon, Doom Desire, Mirror Shot), Psychic (Light Screen), and Normal (Flash). The light itself is neutral force capable of being used by all elements, and is therefore not an element itself.

Regarding a "nice" Light-type, "nice" isn't super-effective/ineffective against anything that Normal isn't, whereas the Dark types' defining malevolent aura is enough to make them immune to Psychic and effective against Ghost (and therefore warrant the creation of a separate type). Therefore, the nice Pokémon like Chansey and Clefairy are categorized as normal


Are Ghost Pokémon the souls of dead Pokémon?
Spoiler:
Most likely not. While their tendencies to loiter around graveyards may indicate that there is a connection, it has never been directly stated that Ghost Pokémon are actual ghosts. Note that the soul of the Marowak that haunted the Pokémon Tower in RBY did not turn into a Gastly/Haunter/Gengar, but took the form of a shadow, and later a Marowak. In the anime, Pikachu's soul (temporarily removed by the Ghost Pokémon in Lavender Town) kept the form of a Pikachu as well.

There seems to be another type of spirit in the Pokémon world, an invisible force that cannot exist on its own and thus possesses inanimate objects like Banette, Bronzong, and Claydol (the 108 spirits that are bound to Spiritomb's Odd Keystone could be the same type). If this type of spirit was an already-existing Ghost Pokémon, it wouldn't need a host body as Ghost Pokémon are capable of existing independently.


SECTION V: BREEDING/GENETICS
Spoiler:

What are Shiny Pokémon?
Spoiler:
The anime and games differ slightly here: in the games, there is only one alternate coloration for a Pokémon whereas in the anime, there is greater color differentiation. Pinkin Island Pokémon are all pink. Pokémon native to the Orange Islands have a more tropical look to them.

So how do some shinies have minute differences like Gastrodon, Happiny, and Garchomp while others are much more different? This was referenced in Project R (the codename for TR's plot at the Lake of Rage in GSC). By using radio signals, they were able to create a population of shiny Gyarados that had Magikarp-esque colors.

That in mind, "shininess" can be induced by all sorts of environmental triggers, from radio waves to radiation.

There's most likely a genetic aspect involved as well, and the 1/8192 chance of a shiny being bred is comparable to a random appearance mutation (like black pepper moths).


How can Pokémon of different species breed?
Spoiler:
Animals can breed interspecially when they have a recent common ancestor. For example, lions and tigers have a recent common ancestor that was very similar to them, and therefore they can breed. The same thing goes for horses, donkeys, zebras, and other equines.

Now all [non-Legendary] Pokémon are apparently descendants of Mew. Chronologically, below Mew are the Ancient Pokémon: Aerodactyl, Relicanth, Kabutops, Lileep, etc... [at least] one for every Egg Group that exists today. Below these ancient Pokémon are the current 400+ that we know and love today.

Considering that there have not been any reports of a fish Pokémon being evolutionarily placed between Magikarp and Relicanth, all Pokémon have one direct, recent, common ancestor: a fossil Pokémon. This makes them close enough to breed interspecially. However, the distance between Egg Groups is further, as the differing Group's common ancestor, Mew, is too far away.

So in scientific nomenclature, while Cradily would be something like "Poképlantae Cirripedia", Vileplume would be "Poképlantae Rafflesia". Same genus, different species, but related closely enough to breed with other members of Plantae (like Sunflora, which would be something along the lines of Poképlantae Helianthus).



How do baby Pokémon inherit their father's attacks?
Spoiler:
Cell memory. Just as human memories seem to be transferrable through organ transplants, traces of an attack that a Pokémon learns are stored in cell memory. This is why baby Pokémon can "inherit" their father's attacks, and not their father's entire potential moveset.


SECTION VI: MISCELLANEOUS
Spoiler:

Do Pokémon age inside of their PokéBalls?
Spoiler:
No. When converted into a non-physical form, the Pokémon's body is no longer subject to oxidation (breathing) or cell division, the two causes of aging.


Do Pokémon know what's going on around them when they're inside of their PokéBalls?
Spoiler:
One possibility is that the Pokémon's soul remains outside of the PokéBall while the body is digitized. Due to the link between body and soul, the spirit wouldn't be able to travel very far from its Ball, but would know what is going on around it. If these spirits are the same type that can manipulate objects (like the type that inhabit Banette and Claydol), this could also explain how some Pokémon are able to open their PokéBalls while inside of them.


Why do PokeDex entries list huge Pokemon as being so light?
Spoiler:
These are a few specific examples, but similar explanations can be applied to other situations.

Regarding Lugia, it probably has honeycombed bones and other weight-savers to assist in flight (like most birds do). The same goes for Rayquaza.

Now about Kyogre/Wailord, those values are ridiculously low. Therefore it is possible that their weights were taken in water because, realistically, a Pokemon like Wailord isn't going to be on land often... and when they are, they tend to float.


Can Pokémon die?
Spoiler:
Pokémon can be killed: Pokémon graveyards appear in most of the games. When under the command of a Trainer, Pokémon hold back their full destructive power, which is why Pokémon don't [usually] die in regulated matches. In the wild, however, there's no reason for a Pidgey to pull back on its Aerial Ace if it really wants to eat that Wurmple. Of course, Pokémon are much more resistant to injury than humans.

Note: in episode 105 of the anime, "Charizard Chills", Ash's Charizard gets hit with a Poliwrath's Ice Beam that freezes it solid; Ash fears that Charizard may die from its injuries.

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  #2    
Old November 12th, 2009 (8:01 PM).
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    Good post. I wasn't aware you were making such a thing, though it definitely goes in the same vein as my various articles.

    There's a few points I wanted to bring up on some of the entries, though not many. Hopefully they can influence the compendium for the better.

    Finally, I just think it should be made more clear that most of the answers in here are fan-theories, despite being the most logical conclusions. Pretending to be the be-all, end-all answer to everything (even when it's not trying to be) can annoy some people. Perhaps a text-marker or image-label of some sort can be applied to the different answers, denoting them as being stated canon, ambiguous canon, logical fan theory, or rationalized fan theory.


    What defines a Pokémon?
    Spoiler:
    A simple question with a difficult answer: when one considers that possessed dolls, space viruses, and digital coding can be classified as a Pokémon, things get a bit complicated.

    Therefore, it is best to list some criteria that a Pokémon must fill.
    In order to be a Pokémon, the thing in question must obey at least 3 of the following:
    • Must be a sentient being who has properties that correspond to predefined elemental types.
    • Must be able to learn attacks and moves that correspond to a defined list of moves.
    • Must be able to breed with other Pokémon, obeying the Egg Grouping laws.
    • Must be a direct biological descendant of Arceus.

    Therefore, while a human may be able to learn Scratch and could be classified as a Normal type, they cannot breed with Pokémon and are not biologically descended from Arceus.

    Porygon, although artificially created, does meet 3 of the criteria.

    At first, Deoxys only seems to fit the first two criteria, but as a confirmed Pokémon, one can conclude that the DNA that composes the deoxyvirus that is Deoxys must have been derived from Arceus in some way.

    General-sentience seems to be an anime-only requirement for Pokemon. While there are many Pokemon of equal or greater-than intelligence compared to humans in the games, the vast majority appear to be of an animal-level intelligence. I feel this requirement should only be applicable to the anime, while being probable for the games.

    Do non-Pokémon animals exist?
    Spoiler:
    In the anime, yes. Fish, worms, and a dog have been spotted. Ash dresses up in a cow [not Miltank] costume in one episode.

    In the games, the answer is seems to be "no". The only non-Pokémon life outside of humans and plants is PokéRus, which is described as a microscopic organism. However, it is argued that non-Pokémon animals do exist ingame since PokéDex entries reference real animals (Tentacool is called the Jellyfish Pokémon, which would imply that there are normal jellyfish floating around that Tentacool was be compared to).

    Though I agree with the admitted ambiguity of this issue in the Pokemon world expressed in your answer, a friend of mine felt you were "ignoring" the facts to fit some sort of agenda. So, acting in her stead, I should point out that while non-Pokemon animals are mentioned in Pokedex entries and don't appear in the games, this shouldn't immediately bring question to their existence. Realize that the games are a vehicle for entertainment, so such things as "Why don't you use the bathroom," "When do you sleep," and "The world seems so small," won't be represented. They simply don't align with the theme of the game, which is Pokemon. Therefore, it can be assumed that animals do exist, they just aren't seen because they aren't important.

    Why do Trainers need to use trading machines?
    Spoiler:
    All Trainers have a PokéDex, or some sort of device that both reacts to PokéBalls and has a copy of their Trainer ID. Pokémon that have been captured are imprinted with their corresponding PokéBall's serial number and their Trainer's ID number. If you were to just give your PokéBall to another person, the Trainer IDs embedded in the Ball and Pokémon wouldn't respond to the new Trainer, identified by their PokéDex [or similar device]. What are the consequences of this? Most likely, the Ball wouldn't release the Pokémon.

    The earliest instance in the anime I can recall that is contrary to this is the Viridian City Pokecenter showdown, or episode 2. Misty easily picked up a Pokeball for battle, and it reacted.

    I think the purpose of Trading Machines is more a case of registering with the beaurocratic government just like we have to when a car changes hands.

    Is Arcanine/Chimecho/Lucario/Rotom a Legendary Pokémon?
    Spoiler:
    No/No/No/No.

    Legendary Pokémon are classified as Pokémon that were responsible for the creation of the world and universe and/or controlling natural phenomena (volcanic eruptions, wind, thunderstorms, dreams). So while a Pokémon could have legends about it and thus be legendary (inb4 Redstar and HAIL SLOWPOKE), this is different from the classification of a Legendary (note the capitalization) Pokémon. The only known exception to this is Deoxys, which is classified as a Legendary simply because of its insanely high power levels.

    The source of confusion with Arcanine is due to the PokéDex's listing its species as LEGENDARY POKÉMON. However, if a Pokémon's species determined whether or not it was a Legendary, then we should see that all confirmed Legendary Pokémon have a species of LEGENDARY; they don't, which means that Arcanine's species name has nothing to do with its being a Legendary (it is, however, still legendary). While it may have been intended to be a Legendary Pokémon at some point, by the time the games were released that had changed.

    The only reason Chimecho is even associated with Legendaries is due to its placement in the Regional PokéDex, where it is the last Pokémon. However, it has never been specifically stated that the end of the regional Pokedex is reserved for ONLY Legendaries. That aside, Chimecho does not fit the definition of a Legendary Pokémon.

    Lucario does seem to be a bit more important than other Pokemon, what with its psychic/aura powers and starring in a movie. However, none of these traits make it a Legendary (although, like Arcanine, it could still be legendary). Like Chimecho and its PokéDex number, it has never been specifically stated that ONLY Legendary Pokémon can star in a movie. Its exclusive abilites aren't very exclusive at all: Golduck is another non-Psychic types that exhibit telepathic powers, and Togekiss can use Aura Sphere. Once again, Lucario does not fit the definition of a Legendary Pokémon.

    Rotom's argument, like Chimecho's, is based on something completely arbitrary: the music that plays when you battle it. The fact that there is only one ingame is also irrelevant (Castform/Eevee come to mind).

    I would like to point out that in the Japanese text of the games, legendary Pokemon are divided into three types: Pokemon of legend, Mirage Pokemon, and Pokemon of myth. All three were brought into the singular term "Legendary" upon American translation.

    It should also be realized that "Legendary" carries more of a competitive-battling focus in American-use, which explains why Mewtwo and Deoxys count as Legendarys.

    Without going too into it (been discussed before, often, and excruciatingly-detailed), I think the above Pokemon, "pseudo-legendaries", if you will, are legendarys in the sense that they are the focus of legends, but not "Legendarys" (capital l) due to not having a strong battling-focus. So, they're more like "Pokemon of cultural significance", just not of existential significance.

    How do composite Pokémon like Slowpoke/Beldum/Magnemite/Diglett/etc. evolve if there are no proper Pokémon around?
    Spoiler:
    To answer the question directly, these Pokémon cannot evolve if their companions are not present: They can only evolve when the other Pokémon are nearby, not the other way around (i.e. they do not spontaneously evolve and the Shellder/Beldum/Magnemite/Diglett/etc. appear afterwards).

    However, when the Pokémon is ready to evolve, they send out pheromones, telepathic messages, or even sounds to attract the Pokémon necessary for their evolution.

    A subpoint should be made for Diglett. Note the Ruby/Sapphire 'Dex entry:

    Dugtrio are actually triplets that emerged from one body. As a result, each triplet thinks exactly like the other two triplets. They work cooperatively to burrow endlessly.

    And the Emerald entry:

    Dugtrio are actually triplets that emerged from one body. As a result, each triplet thinks exactly like the other two triplets. They work cooperatively to burrow endlessly.

    So they're not strictly in the same grouping as the others, having a different evolution-type, but should still be referenced for confusion's-sake.

    Where does Kadabra's spoon come from?
    Spoiler:
    The Spoon is generated as the Abra evolves; it will turn any nearby metal into a spoon for its use. The spoon is used to store excess psychic powers (note that Alakazam, who is stronger, gains another Spoon). However, the Spoon is still connected to Kadabra's internal energy supply, which is why if a Kadabra loses its spoon, its psychokinetic powers are weakened.

    An alternate theory is that the spoon is really just the metaphysical representation of Kadabra and Alakazam's psychic powers, and don't actually exist.

    How/why is Magikarp still alive?
    Spoiler:



    Go Magikarp go!

    Firstly, while they are weak as Pokémon, they're pretty sturdy animals. Magikarp can be found in every body of water to date, hinting at an adaptability that few Pokémon can rival. Their scales are also extremely strong, and their thrashing about can be dangerous. Their evolved relatives, Gyarados, may also play a role in protecting Magikarp schools.

    Considering the question, I think I'd like seeing my various theories from the other thread included with deeper explanation.

    How do fish Pokémon, like Quilfish and Lanturn, battle out of water?
    Spoiler:


    See 1:32 - 2:01.

    Non-fish Water Pokémon have no problems on land, with exceptions like Gyarados (which has a mystical dragon aspect to it).

    In the games, to prevent Trainers from being limited, no feature was implemented to reference fish Pokémon survival on land... although the Stadium/Colosseum games will have them floating in midair.

    See my theory from another thread: "
    Water Pokemon are elemental. They don't need a water source nearby to produce water... And if you're wondering how they get around when they can't swim. That's kinda obvious: they lubricate the ground and slide, or use their water-production to surf on the ground. Pretty simple. (I imagine that in-universe handicaps would also be granted for the benefit of Pokemon at a disadvantage)"

    Why do PokeDex entries list huge Pokemon as being so light?
    Spoiler:
    These are a few specific examples, but similar explanations can be applied to other situations.

    Regarding Lugia, it probably has honeycombed bones and other weight-savers to assist in flight (like most birds do). The same goes for Rayquaza.

    Now about Kyogre/Wailord, those values are ridiculously low. Therefore it is possible that their weights were taken in water because, realistically, a Pokemon like Wailord isn't going to be on land often... and when they are, they tend to float.

    My take on it was always that the 'Dex entries on weight were the average taken upon immediate evolution, when they would still be relatively small.
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      #3    
    Old November 13th, 2009 (3:26 AM). Edited November 13th, 2009 by The Scientist.
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    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Redstar View Post
    Good post. I wasn't aware you were making such a thing, though it definitely goes in the same vein as my various articles.
    I think I first mentioned it before you showed up, here.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Redstar View Post
    Finally, I just think it should be made more clear that most of the answers in here are fan-theories, despite being the most logical conclusions. Pretending to be the be-all, end-all answer to everything (even when it's not trying to be) can annoy some people. Perhaps a text-marker or image-label of some sort can be applied to the different answers, denoting them as being stated canon, ambiguous canon, logical fan theory, or rationalized fan theory.
    The introduction does mention that some of this is theory, but a color-coding system could be in order.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Redstar View Post
    General-sentience seems to be an anime-only requirement for Pokemon. While there are many Pokemon of equal or greater-than intelligence compared to humans in the games, the vast majority appear to be of an animal-level intelligence. I feel this requirement should only be applicable to the anime, while being probable for the games.
    The Sinnoh Region myth and Sinnoh Folk Tale #3 regard Pokémon as being equal to humans: both sentient and sapient (whereas animals are only sentient).

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Sinnoh Folk Tale #3
    There once were Pokémon that
    became very close to humans.
    There once were humans and Pokémon
    that ate together at the same table.
    It was a time when there existed no
    differences to distinguish the two.
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Redstar View Post
    Though I agree with the admitted ambiguity of this issue in the Pokemon world expressed in your answer, a friend of mine felt you were "ignoring" the facts to fit some sort of agenda. So, acting in her stead, I should point out that while non-Pokemon animals are mentioned in Pokedex entries and don't appear in the games, this shouldn't immediately bring question to their existence. Realize that the games are a vehicle for entertainment, so such things as "Why don't you use the bathroom," "When do you sleep," and "The world seems so small," won't be represented. They simply don't align with the theme of the game, which is Pokemon. Therefore, it can be assumed that animals do exist, they just aren't seen because they aren't important.
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Redstar View Post
    The earliest instance in the anime I can recall that is contrary to this is the Viridian City Pokecenter showdown, or episode 2. Misty easily picked up a Pokeball for battle, and it reacted.
    Alright, that answer has been removed. Although Misty doesn't have a PokeDex with which to react to the Ball, I think Ash may have used other trainers' Balls (hehe) at some point or another.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Redstar View Post
    I think the purpose of Trading Machines is more a case of registering with the beaurocratic government just like we have to when a car changes hands.
    Maybe each Pokemon League keeps a file on every Trainer in the region and their stats, which includes the amount and type of Pokemon caught. Each League will only allow you to enter Pokemon that have been registered to you in order to discourage stealing and other underhanded methods of obtaining Pokemon.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Redstar View Post
    I would like to point out that in the Japanese text of the games, legendary Pokemon are divided into three types: Pokemon of legend, Mirage Pokemon, and Pokemon of myth. All three were brought into the singular term "Legendary" upon American translation.
    This information has been included.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Redstar View Post
    A subpoint should be made for Diglett. Note the Ruby/Sapphire 'Dex entry:
    Dugtrio are actually triplets that emerged from one body. As a result, each triplet thinks exactly like the other two triplets. They work cooperatively to burrow endlessly.

    And the Emerald entry:

    Dugtrio are actually triplets that emerged from one body. As a result, each triplet thinks exactly like the other two triplets. They work cooperatively to burrow endlessly.

    So they're not strictly in the same grouping as the others, having a different evolution-type, but should still be referenced for confusion's-sake.
    Done.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Redstar View Post
    An alternate theory is that the spoon is really just the metaphysical representation of Kadabra and Alakazam's psychic powers, and don't actually exist.
    I won't add this just yet, I think I saw an entry somewhere that mentioned Alakazam using the spoons for close-range physical strikes.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Redstar View Post
    Considering the question, I think I'd like seeing my various theories from the other thread included with deeper explanation.
    The commonness and reference to physical sturdiness were the basis of your Magikarp theory (the first post was a description of killifish).
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      #4    
    Old November 13th, 2009 (6:54 AM). Edited November 13th, 2009 by ♣Gawain♣.
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    Onward to Music!!!
       
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      Actually, and you said it truthfully, it is the best thread I've ever read. You should make a site out of this.
      One thing(and maybe more. I'll inquire later) bothers me though about the Pokeballs.

      Remember the episode about Brock falling in love with the illusion created by Ninetales(Master Quest). Ninetails has a pokeball that looks ancient and porcelain.

      Another, about the giant Claydol episode and the giant rock pokeball. And the movie Pokemon 4 Ever, when young Prof. Oak battles with Ash using his Charmeleon(and where is it now? O_o). The pokemon was contained in the mechanical looking robot.

      You said:

      Quote:
      Originally Posted by The Scientist View Post

      How do PokéBalls work?
      Spoiler:
      Spoiler:


      Contrary to popular belief, Pokémon are not converted into energy when recalled to a PokéBall. Energy used colloquially can mean two things: plasma and EM waves. The former would take up more space than the original Pokémon (although something like Rotom is a possible exception), while the latter can't be stored in any form.

      The best explanation is that the Pokémon are digitized. This theory is directly supported by the fact that the Pokémon world does have the technology necessary to convert matter into data and vice versa (PC Pokémon/Item storage system, "Electric Soldier Porygon").

      Every PokéBall has a serial number. When a Pokémon is captured and digitized for the first time, a copy of that serial number is imprinted onto it. PokéBalls are built so that they cannot capture anything except the Pokémon that has its imprinted code.

      For example, say you have a PokéBall with a serial number of SD000000001, and you catch a Natu with it. Natu is now imprinted with its PokéBall's serial number. If you try to catch or recall another Pokémon with Natu's PokéBall, it won't work because the embedded serials don't match up. If another PokéBall (with a different serial number) is used on your Natu, it won't work for the same reason.

      Snag Balls override the serial number check.

      In those days, digital technology hasn't been born. Plasma and Electromagnetic waves has just been realized and tested for economic use. And in the very ancient days, they don't know any applications for plasma.
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        #5    
      Old November 13th, 2009 (7:11 AM).
      The Scientist's Avatar
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      Quote:
      Originally Posted by Viceroy Gawain View Post
      Actually, and you said it truthfully, it is the best thread I've ever read. You should make a site out of this.
      One thing(and maybe more. I'll inquire later) bothers me though about the Pokeballs.

      Remember the episode about Brock falling in love with the illusion created by Ninetales(Master Quest). Ninetails has a pokeball that looks ancient and porcelain.

      Another, about the giant Claydol episode and the giant rock pokeball. And the movie Pokemon 4 Ever, when young Prof. Oak battles with Ash using his Charmeleon(and where is it now? O_o). The pokemon was contained in the mechanical looking robot.

      You said:



      In those days, digital technology hasn't been born. Plasma and Electromagnetic waves has just been realized and tested for economic use. And in the very ancient days, they don't know any applications for plasma.
      I have thought about this, as well as other Pokemon storage devices like apricorns and the giant spoon. Modern PokeBalls, however, have a few extra perks: item storage (there's a reason Hold Items weren't always around), Trainer ID/PokeBall SN embedding, a possible VR environment...

      One possible explanation is that Pokemon have the inherent ability to turn into data, and this change is triggered by a substance/radiation. Modern technology, data coding and all, was reverse-engineered from Pokemon like Metagross, which are described as supercomputers.

      Any ideas?
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        #6    
      Old November 13th, 2009 (4:00 PM).
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      * KO'd Pokemon can be captured in the anime, but not in the games. I'm pretty sure.
        #7    
      Old November 13th, 2009 (5:19 PM). Edited November 14th, 2009 by Kirbychu.
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        Nice thread.

        Quote:
        Originally Posted by The Scientist View Post

        How do composite Pokémon like Slowpoke/Beldum/Magnemite/etc. evolve if there are no proper Pokémon around?
        Spoiler:
        To answer the question directly, these Pokémon cannot evolve if their companions are not present: They can only evolve when the other Pokémon are nearby, not the other way around (i.e. they do not spontaneously evolve and the Shellder/Beldum/Magnemite/etc. appear afterwards).

        However, when the Pokémon is ready to evolve, they send out pheromones, telepathic messages, or even sounds to attract the Pokémon necessary for their evolution.

        I think it might be important to note that in this episode
        when Beldum evolves into Metang, it "created" another Beldum to evolve, instead of fusing with another one.

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          #8    
        Old November 13th, 2009 (9:54 PM).
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          While you mention if pokemon age in their pokeball, my questions is if there is evidence if pokemon age at all? And if they do age, can they die from old age?

          I always remember the episode with the old Ninetails when I think about pokemon aging.
            #9    
          Old November 14th, 2009 (4:12 AM).
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          Quote:
          Originally Posted by Kirbychu View Post
          Nice thread.


          I think it might be important to note that in this episode
          when Beldum evolves into Metang, it did "create" another Beldum to evolve, instead of fusing with another one.

          This has been added to the corresponding section.

          Quote:
          Originally Posted by ShatteredRose View Post
          While you mention if pokemon age in their pokeball, my questions is if there is evidence if pokemon age at all? And if they do age, can they die from old age?

          I always remember the episode with the old Ninetails when I think about pokemon aging.
          Pokemon do age: aside from that Ninetales, there was the blue-eyed Surfing Pikachu (Puka), and Tracey's Scyther was said to be fairly old.

          As far as dying of old age, I think that the Onix grave in the Sevii Islands was for an Onix that died of old age.
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            #10    
          Old November 18th, 2009 (12:16 PM).
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          Minor update.

          I'll consider this ver. 1.10.
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            #11    
          Old June 27th, 2012 (5:22 AM).
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            Quote:
            What defines a Pokémon?

            Spoiler:
            A simple question with a difficult answer: when one considers that possessed dolls, space viruses, and digital coding can be classified as a Pokémon, things get a bit complicated.

            Therefore, it is best to list some criteria that a Pokémon must fill.
            In order to be a Pokémon, the thing in question must obey at least 3 of the following:
            • Must be a sentient being who has properties that correspond to predefined elemental types.
            • Must be able to learn attacks and moves that correspond to a defined list of moves.
            • Must be able to breed with other Pokémon, obeying the Egg Grouping laws.
            • Must be a direct biological descendant of Arceus.
            Therefore, while a human may be able to learn Scratch and could be classified as a Normal type, they cannot breed with Pokémon and are not biologically descended from Arceus.

            Porygon, although artificially created, does meet 3 of the criteria.

            At first, Deoxys only seems to fit the first two criteria, but as a confirmed Pokémon, one can conclude that the DNA that composes the deoxyvirus that is Deoxys must have been derived from Arceus in some way
            I noticed something. everuy single pokemon lays eggs to reproduce, this is a charecteristic of reptiles, and obviosly not all pokemon can be consideres reptiles. dosent this mean, then, that laying eggs is also a charecteristic of a pokemon?
              #12    
            Old June 27th, 2012 (12:34 PM).
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            Please don't revive threads that haven't been posted in for a month or more, thanks! :)
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            Theme * Pair * VM * PM

            Not all men...

            Are all men stupid?

            That's right.

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