Seen 2 Weeks Ago
Posted 2 Weeks Ago
7 posts
22 Days
Hello hello!

I recently fell in love again with Pokemon thanks to BDSP and I want to get to do some online matches with friends and strangers alike, thing I couldn't do way back when with my Nintendo DS. I remember back in the days I would set my sight on a Pokemon, then find one, level it up to 50 so it's just good enough for the Battle Tower, give it a good moveset and items and BAM! - done. But nowdays, it feels like I push my thinking a bit further, because of what I heard and seen others do. (btw I don't really like looking at strategies because I feel like a thief)

So first things first, I'm more easily influenced by tier lists. Since I pick Pokemons that I like the most, I would pick a fellow like Electrode, and see he's ranked PU, and that immediately discourages me from trying the man because I expect online opponents to run stuff that sits at the top of rankings. I guess that anything can win in the right hands, but I don't have such hands so I need to follow some basic guidelines to choose my Pokemons. But what would those be? Do I pay attention to stats, type combinations, move pool? All three?

Talking about movesets, I always have the feeling I plan my movesets wrong. In my head, I would pick up a Pokemon and go like this :
1] First move has to be a STAB,
2] Second move could be a STAB for second type if it has one, otherwise coverage,
3] More coverage or status move
4] All-out offensive dumbo with a 4th attack, stat boost, arena or gimmicky move

So on first glance that looks alright to me, but again when I look online it seems the movesets are really thought through differently, which makes me think I am headin completely the wrong way. So I think I'm missing a basis about how to choose moves in the game. Do you always need STABs? What could make a certain move worth skipping on one mon but must-get on another?

Oh and at the end of this post it might sound like I want to go competitive, but I don't really want to go this deep. What I aim ultimately aiming for is to have a sizable collection of battle-ready Pokemons and be able to mish mash 3 or 6 of them together to form a team and have a reasonable chance at a win. I never tried to battle anyone online yet but from what I gather by peeking online I don't feel like I'm ready for it anyways. Hence why I want to gather some insight around here ! ^_^

Thanks for answering ~

TLDR:
- How do you select Pokemons and combine them in teams?
- How do you select their moves? Is there a pattern I need to look out for?

Sweet Serenity

Castelia City
Seen 1 Hour Ago
Posted 10 Hours Ago
509 posts
280 Days
Most definitely. I can definitely help you out. From my experience, it doesn't seem that many people really focus too much on competitive battling here. However, I'm all for it and I would be glad to write up a guide to help you with building a team. If you want to your Pokémon to perform to their full potential, it helps to understand how IVs and EVs work and how to apply them, and how to breed Pokémon for good IVs. If you understand it, then that's good. If not, I could write a guide on it for you later on if you need me to. Also, I should say that this guide works mainly for Singles. I can do Doubles too, but only if you want me to and if you're interested in Doubles.

Keep in mind that Smogon tier rankings do not always determine whether or not a Pokémon is good. For the most part, the tier lists on Smogon determine how well a Pokémon does on their battling platform, Pokémon Showdown, under their rules. Pokémon Showdown typically bans Pokémon that they believe are too powerful, certain moves and strategies, and often have many rules such as the "no sleep mod," which prevents more than one Pokémon from being asleep at a time, no Dynamaxing, and so on. Players must understand that Pokémon Showdown isn't the only place to play Pokémon competitively either. A good example of how the tier rankings aren't perfect involves the Pokémon Seismitoad. On Smogon, it is ranked RU, which means it's considered not that great. However, keep in mind that, on Pokémon Showdown outside of Anything Goes (AG), you're not allowed to Dynamax. If you played Singles on Pokémon Sword and Shield however, where moves, abilities, and strategies are not banned, you would notice Seismitoad being used a lot more often and completely dominating the meta game. This is because Seismitoad has the ability "Swift Swim," which doubles its Speed in the Rain from 74 to 148. When it Dynamaxes, it can set its own Rain with Max Geyser.

This, combined with the fact that Seismitoad can learn very strong coverage moves such as Grass-type Power Whip, Fighting-type Brick Break, which can break screens, and has a great STAB move in Earthquake, Seismitoad is a very dangerous sweeper and is also a great Zacian counter, which is arguably the most broken Pokémon of all time. Thus, despite Seismitoad being ranked as RU on Smogon, it is easily an Uber on Pokémon Sword and Shield. Thus, I wouldn't let the tier rankings of Pokémon on Smogon discourage you from using your favorites. As long as you use Pokémon for specific roles that they excel the best at, Electrode can definitely be a good Pokémon. Electrode used to be the fastest Pokémon in the game in the past and is still extremely fast despite the Speed stat power creep over the years. Electrode is great for setting up dual screens, which refer to Light Screen and Reflect because of its high Speed, and switching out with Volt Switch. This could be useful for both Singles and Doubles as well. To get a good understanding of how to build a competitive team, understand whether or not you want to play Doubles or Singles, as they both require a different approach to play. When you're playing Singles, the most important thing to consider is type matchups and Pokémon roles during battle. When you're playing Doubles, the most important thing is to consider Pokémon abilities, certain moves, and how they work with certain Pokémon.

Without further ado, here is the guide to building a good Singles team.

Pokémon Battle Roles

To get started with Singles battles, it is important to understand the different Pokémon roles that Pokémon have during battle. Such roles are physical sweepers, special sweepers, pivots, wallbreakers, stallbreakers, stallers, hazard setters, hazard removers, healers, revenge killers, weather setters, and so on. In case you are unaware of how Pokémon roles work during battle, I will explain each major role in detail.

Sweepers – These are Pokémon that have higher Speed and offensive stats than the average Pokémon, which allows them to out-speed most Pokémon and hit them hard enough to KO them in one hit. Their role is simply to be your main Pokémon on offense to knockout many of the opponent's Pokémon as possible. Sweepers can be physical sweepers or special sweepers. Physical sweepers are Pokémon that have high Attack along with high Speed and special sweepers are Pokémon that have high Special Attack and high Speed. Oftentimes, sweepers tend to have weak defenses, making them frail. However, they because they can often out-speed most Pokémon and hit hard, their frailty shouldn't be too much of an issue. A good example of a physical sweeper is Garchomp, as it has an Attack stat of 130 and a Speed stat of 102, and good example of special sweeper is Gengar, as it has a Special Attack stat of 130 and a Speed stat of 110.

Wallbreakers – These are Pokémon with massive attacking stats that enable them to do massive damage to Pokémon that stall or have high defensive stats. Without a good wallbreaker on your team, you would struggle to do major damage against your opponent if they using a stall strategy and/or have Pokémon that have powerful defensive stats. Like sweepers, wallbreakers can be physical or special. Unlike sweepers however, they are not required to have high Speed stats, as their goal is primarily to switch into an opponent's highly defensive Pokémon before switching out. Depending on whether or not they're physical or special attackers, they work best when holding items such as Choice Band or Choice Specs. Much like sweepers, wallbreakers can be either physical or special. A good example of a physical wallbreaker would be Kartana, a Pokémon with 181 base Attack (which can also be a good sweeper as well with 109 Speed), and a good example of a special wallbreaker would be Xurkitree, which has 171 base Special Attack. While I am aware that these Pokémon are not in Pokémon Brilliant Diamond or Shining Pearl, the goal is to look for Pokémon that have attacking stats that are higher than Pokémon with high defensive stats. The higher those stats, the better the wallbreaker.

Stallbreakers – Sometimes, you might be in a situation where your wallbreaker can't get the job done because it's not hitting hard enough or got knocked out. In that case, you use a stallbreaker. Stallbreakers are Pokémon that use chip damage to defeat Pokémon rather than all out attacks. More often than not, stallbreakers are stallers as well. A common stallbreaker tactic would be to use the old school tried and true combo of Toxic, Protect, and Recover. The more bulky the stallbreakers, the better it is. Stallbreakers could also use moves that prevent stallers from stalling, such as Taunt. A good example of a stallbreaker would be Cresselia, which has high defensive stats, can learn Toxic through TM (depending on the game), Protect, and Moonlight to recover health.

Hazard setters – These are Pokémon that are mainly chosen to lead the battle and setup your strategy by placing hazards on the field such as Spikes, Toxic Spikes, Sticky Web, or Stealth Rock. Spikes does damage to the opposing Pokémon that touch the ground and does more damage based on how many layers were set. Toxic Spikes poison Pokémon that switch in that touch the ground and if two layers of them are put in place, they badly poison the target. Sticky Web lowers the speed of Pokémon that switch that touch the ground by one stage. Stealth Rock damages all Pokémon that switch in and does more damage to types that are weak to the Rock-type. This is very useful in Singles. I would also use this category for setting dual screens as well, such as Light Screen and Reflect, to halve both special and physical damage respectively. A good example of a good dual screen setter would be Electrode, as mentioned before.

Hazard removers – These are Pokémon that can learn the moves Defog and Rapid Spin. Defog has the ability to remove all possible entry hazards and screens on both sides of the field and Rapid Spin has the ability to remove hazards such as Spikes, Stealth Rock, Sticky Web, and Toxic Spikes from your side of the field, as well as boost your Speed by one stage. The wisest thing would be to look for hazard removers that also can be your hazard setters at the same time.

Pivots – These are Pokémon that can learn a move that allows you to switch out by using a move rather than switching out the normal way. Some moves allow you to do damage before switching out such as Volt Switch, U-Turn, and Flip Turn. Others move simply allow you to switch out such as Teleport. Baton Pass allows you to switch out while passing that Pokémon's stat changes to the Pokémon you choose. Parting Shot allows you to lower the Attack and Special Attack stats of the target before switching out. These moves allow you gain or keep momentum as you switch. If the pivot is slower than the opponent, then you would move second, allowing your other Pokémon to switch in safely. A good example of an attacking pivot would be Electrode with Volt Switch. Chansey and/or Blissey is good for using Teleport. Umbreon could be a good bulky Baton Passer. Incineroar is great for using Parting Shot.

Revenge killers – These are Pokémon that you use to switch in to battle after the other Pokémon faints. Revenge killers often have good offensive stats and speed like sweepers, or, if they're not very fast, then they have moves with speed control, which refer to priority moves such as Aqua Jet, Quick Attack, ExtremeSpeed, Ice Shard, and so on. Good examples of revenge killers in this regard are Weavile and Mamoswine. However, Ditto with the ability Imposter is also a very good revenge killer, as it can instantly transform into the target Pokémon upon switching in. With a Choice Scarf, it would always out-speed its target and it can copy its stat changes. This would be great against a Pokémon that Ditto could instantly defeat. For example, if a Garchomp knocked out your Pokémon, if you switch into Ditto, you could instantly transform into it, attack first, and knock it out with its own Dragon-type attack.

Weather setters – These are Pokémon that can instantly set up weather conditions that can give you an edge in battle without having to waste a move such as Sunny Day, Rain Dance, or Sandstorm. Such Pokémon have abilities that instantly bring about such conditions. Of course, Rain boosts the power of Water-type attacks, Sun boosts Fire attacks, Sandstorm causes chip damage every turn to Pokémon that are not Rock, Ground, or Steel types, and Hail causes chip damage to Pokémon that aren't Ice-type and gives 100% accuracy to Blizzard. In addition, certain Pokémon abilities are activated depending on the weather. Also, the move Weather Ball changes type depending on the weather and gets more powerful. Examples of good weather setters are Politoed or Pelipper for Rain, Ninetales, Torkoal, or Groudon for Sun, Abomasnow for Hail, and Tyranitar for Sand.

Pokémon Cores

Furthermore, when building your team, you want to understand Pokémon cores. Cores basically refer to at least two or three types that work well with each other, either offensively or defensively. For example, the most common and well-known core is Water, Grass, and Fire. Each core works well defensively because you could switch into another Pokémon that resists its weakness. For instance, if a Fire-type is threatening your Grass-type, you can switch into your Water-type to save that Pokémon and mitigate the damage. Other cores that exist are Dark, Fighting, and Psychic, which function the same way that Water, Grass, and Fire can. When building your team, you can think of which cores can work better with the Pokémon that you choose. An effective way to use cores is to build them around synergy as well, which is mainly done by considering certain abilities. For example, a good ability to have is Flash Fire for your Fire-type Pokémon in your core, as it could not only completely negate the Fire-type attack that would KO your Grass-type, but it would also increase the power of its own Fire-type attacks. You can research and experiment different abilities to see what works together.

Different types of teams


Finally, before building your team, understand the different types of teams that you can build. Each type of team is based upon the roles and characteristics of the Pokémon you choose to be on your team. Such teams are balanced teams, bulky offensive teams, stall teams, Trick Room teams, and weather teams. If you're not sure about how these different teams work, I will explain the characteristics of each team.

Balanced teams – These are the most basic types of teams that you can build when playing Singles. Balanced teams have a combination of Pokémon that can perform each role that I listed previously. If built correctly, then a balanced team should be able to handle any situation that the opponent puts you in.

Bulky offensive teams – This team has Pokémon that have high attacking stats, but instead of being fast like sweepers, they also have high HP and defensive stats. These Pokémon very rarely attack first, but they are able to take hits and hit the opponent's Pokémon hard.

Stall teams – These are Pokémon that, instead of focusing on attacking that often, they attempt to wear down the opponent by using Pokémon with very high defenses and moves that do chip damage such as Toxic, as well as using moves such as Protect and Recover. If you don't have any good wallbreakers, then stall can be very hard to defeat.

Trick Room teams – These are teams that have Pokémon that do well under the conditions of the move Trick Room, which causes slower Pokémon to attack first. Naturally, the Pokémon that excel in Trick Room are those with very low Speed stats. Of course, a bulky offensive team can also be a good Trick Room team if the Pokémon are slow enough.

Weather teams – These are teams that have Pokémon that benefit from a certain weather condition. They are the same type as the type that the weather condition in question benefits and they have abilities that activate under such weather conditions. If your weather team is well-built, then you can get away with playing with a "gym leader style" whereas all or most of the Pokémon on your team are the same type.

Building your team

Now that we went over Pokémon roles, cores, and different teams that you could build, let's build our team. I'm going to show the process of how I build just a balanced team for tonight. I could give examples of how I build the other types another time if you want me to. When building your team, your first step is to select any Pokémon you like with a certain role. In my case, I like using Palkia a lot, so I choose her. Palkia is a Water/Dragon-type Pokémon with great stats because it's legendary. Its Speed is 100 and its best attacking stat is Special Attack, which is 150. In addition, pay attention to what type of moves a Pokémon can learn based upon its category. In Palkia's case, it learns a lot of powerful special attacks to go along with its high Special Attack. Thus, let's give Palkia the role of "special sweeper." Stats wise, I want it maxed out. Thus, I ensure that my Palkia has perfect 31 IVs in at least Speed and Special Attack so it can be fast as possible and hit hard as possible. Its EV spread should be maxed in the stats that it excels the best at. Regarding EVs, every Pokémon can have up to 508 useable EVs. In the case of Palkia, we are going to max her EVs in Speed, which is 252, another 252 in Special Attack, and the remaining 4 would go to Defense since its Defense is a little lower than its Special Defense. A Pokémon's "nature" is also important for stats. In this case, we're going to make Palkia's nature "Timid," which boosts Speed by 10%, but lowers Attack by 10%. That's fine because we don't use Palkia's Attack anyway. "Modest" could also work, which boosts Special Attack by 10%, but lowers Attack by 10%, but you risk Palkia being slower than what it normally could be with Modest. Thus, I would always pick "Timid" for a special sweeper. "Modest" would be better for special wallbreakers instead. As for a held item, Palkia would be holding a Lustrous Orb to boost her Dragon and Water attacks. Now, on to the next Pokémon.

At this point, it is important to keep cores in mind, as I mentioned earlier. In this case, I want to go for a Grass-type Pokémon to create a Water, Grass, and Fire-type core. Thus, I choose Kartana. Kartana is not in your game, but that's not the point. I am just giving you an example of how I build teams and the idea is for you to follow the model of what I'm doing, where you can choose your own Pokémon to fill the role that exists in your game. Because Kartana has 181 Attack and 109 Speed, it would make a great "physical sweeper." Also, because its Attack is very high, it could also be a great physical wallbreaker. When you have a Pokémon that can do two roles well, that's a great thing. Stat wise, we are going to max EVs in Kartana's Attack with 252, and Speed with 252. The remaining 4 can go to Kartana's Defense rather than Special Defense because it's horrible at 20. A good held item for Kartana could be anything to boost its attack power, such as a Life Orb or even a Muscle Band. You could also try an Assault Vest to boost its horrible Special Defense.

For our next Pokémon, we want a Fire-type Pokémon to complete the core. I will choose Heatran. Because Heatran has Special Attack of 130, but a Speed stat of 77, which is slightly below average, we can use it as a special wallbreaker since its too slow to sweep effectively. Still, to ensure that Heatran can hit first as often as it can, we're going to max its Speed with 252, and its Special Attack with 252. The last four can go to Special Defense. However, we want our wallbreaker to hit hard as possible, so instead of making Heatran Timid, let's make it Modest. A good item for Heatran is anything that can help it hit hard to wallbreak, such as Life Orb. I also chose Heatran because of its ability Flash Fire for synergy. Thus, whenever my Kartana would be threatened by Fire-type attack, which it is extremely weak to, I would switch into Heatran, negate that attack, and boost my own Fire-type attacks. When choosing your Pokémon, be mindful of their abilities and how well they work with your team. Now that we have our Fire, Grass, and Water core with each of their roles, let's choose our next Pokémon for our next role.

We need a staller now, perhaps one that can also be a stallbreaker. My choice would be Cresselia. She has 120 HP, 120 Defense, and 130 Special Defense. With those stats, she can pretty much wall anything. With that, we are going to teach her Toxic to badly poison the target for chip damage, Protect to protect Cresselia from attacks and make the poison worse, Moonlight to recover health to keep her in the game after she's attacked after Protecting, and Psychic to do some damage when it's time to attack. Stat wise, we want Cresselia to have maxed HP with 252, maxed Special Defense with 252, and 4 in Defense. Her Nature is best as Calm, which boosts Special Defense by 10%, but lowers Attack by 10%. A good held item for her is a Kee Berry, which would boost her Defense when hit by a physical move, or Leftovers, which gradually increases her health slightly every turn. As a result, her role would be both "staller" and "stallbreaker."

Next, we need a Pokémon in another role that can cover for Cresselia, which would also serve as another core in a way. Next, I would choose a Pokémon that be a good "pivot." In that case, I choose Umbreon. Umbreon is a good bulky defensive Pokémon that can learn a lot of good support, disruptive, and stallbreaking moves. However, Umbreon is also great at using Baton Pass, which is a move I love. Because Umbreon has 95 HP, 110 Defense, and 130 Special Defense, we are going to make Umbreon Calm like Cresselia, and max its HP and Special Defense, while putting the remaining 4 EVs in Defense. A great item for Umbreon would be Leftovers, Kee Berry, or a Rocky Helmet. Whenever Cresselia is threatened by a Dark-type move that it likely won't survive, Umbreon could be a great bulky switch-in to sponge the attack. On Smogon, Umbreon is in the RU tier, which, by their standards, means it's not that good. However, when doing a particular role on other platforms that don't follow Smogon rules or Smogon's Anything Goes (AG) tier, Umbreon does great on my team despite its tier ranking.

Lastly, we need a good lead Pokémon to open our battles. The best role for a lead Pokémon would be a good pivot, entry hazard setter, and/or entry hazard remover. In my case, I choose Landorus-T. Again, Landrous-T doesn't exist in your game, but the point is follow my model that I use to build my team to get good idea of how to build a balanced team. Select a Pokémon that performs the same role as Landorus in your own game. Landorus-T has the ability to set Stealth Rock for chip damage upon switching in, learn Defog to remove all other entry hazards and screens, U-Turn to pivot, and Earthquake as a powerful attack.

In your game, your favorite Pokémon Electrode could be used as a good lead as a dual screen setter rather than entry hazard setter though, but that's still good. Because of Electrode's speed, you want to max its Speed with 252 EVs because it's one of the fastest Pokémon of all time, max its HP with 252 EVs to ensure that it is bulky, and use the remaining 4 on Defense, since it's slightly worse than its Special Defense. You should also make sure that its nature is Timid to make it as fast as possible. A good item could be Light Clay to extend the duration of the screens from 5 turns to 8 turns. Its moves should be Thunderbolt/Foul Play, Volt Switch, Light Screen, and Reflect. That way, you can use your favorite Pokémon effectively without even considering its Smogon tier ranking.

Now, we've built our team. Again, although I've played Pokémon Brilliant Diamond, I barely play competitively on it, so I'm not 100% sure about how each Pokémon works on that game or exactly what's in it, but we can also do research and learn more. I just built the team that I use on Pokémon Showdown for Ubers (save Umbreon knowing Yawn instead of Baton Pass) and on Pokémon Sword for the Battle Stadium and Y-Comm. It also helped me reach Master Ball tier and obtain a relatively high rank in ranked Singles. Thus, next, we're going to pick our moves and summarize our team. It should look something like this:

(Just click the spoiler drop-down button to see the list)

Spoiler:
Physical sweeper/physical wallbreaker
Kartana @ Life Orb – Makes it hit harder
Ability: Beast Boost – Great ability that boosts its Attack every time it sweeps
EVs: 252 Atk / 4 Def / 252 Spe
- Leaf Blade – Strong STAB Grass-type attack with a high critical hit ratio
- Smart Strike – STAB Steel-type move that can never miss
- Sacred Sword – Good Fighting-type coverage that ignores a Pokémon's stat changes, which is good for damaging Pokémon that stall by boosting their defenses or raising their evasion
- Aerial Ace – Good coverage Flying-type move that never misses and is great for speed boosting when Dynamaxing and using Max Airstream (I know Dynamaxing doesn't exist in your game)

Special wallbreaker
Ovens (Heatran) (F) @ Life Orb
Ability: Flash Fire – Great for switching into Fire-type attacks
EVs: 252 SpA / 252 Spe / 4 SpD – Ensures that it hits quickly as it can
Modest Nature – Ensures that it can hit hard as possible to break walls
IVs: 0 Atk - Optional, but 0 Atk IVs ensures that it does less damage when attacking itself when confused
- Fire Blast – While everybody else prefers to give their Heatran Magma Storm, which does a lot of damage, traps the Pokémon, and does chip damage for four turns, I prefer Fire Blast because it's slightly more accurate. 75% accuracy is just too risky for me personally, but either one could do.
- Flash Cannon – Strong Steel-type STAB
- Earth Power – Good Ground-type coverage that could damage many types super-effectively
- Taunt – A good stallbreaking move that only makes it so the opponent could use attacking moves. This prevents stallers from using status moves, forcing them to either attack or switch

Special sweeper
Palkia @ Lustrous Orb – Boosts Palkia's Water-type and Dragon-type attacks
Ability: Pressure
EVs: 252 SpA / 4 SpD / 252 Spe - Ensures that Palkia can sweep
Timid Nature - Ensures that Palkia can move as fast as it possibly can
IVs: 0 Atk
- Spacial Rend - Strong STAB Dragon-type move with a high critical hit ratio
- Hydro Pump – Strong STAB Water-type move
- Aura Sphere – Good Fighting-type coverage that can hit a lot of Pokémon super effectively
- Fire Blast – Strong Fire-type coverage

Staller/Stallbreaker
Cresselia (F) @ Kee Berry
Ability: Levitate
EVs: 252 HP / 4 SpA / 252 SpD – Ensures that she can tank many hits
Calm Nature
IVs: 0 Atk
- Psychic – STAB Psychic-type attack
- Moonlight – Recovers HP to ensure that she can stall for a long time
- Toxic – Chip damage
- Protect – Keeps her in the battle longer

Baton Pass Pivot/Stallbreaker
Umbra (Umbreon) (F) @ Leftovers
Ability: Synchronize – Gives status the opponent the same status condition that it inflicted on it
EVs: 252 HP / 4 Def / 252 SpD – Ensures that Umbreon can tank hits
Calm Nature
IVs: 0 Atk
- Taunt – Disrupts Pokémon that stall and/or set up with status moves
- Work Up – Boosts Attack and Special Attack
- Baton Pass – Passes its Attack and Special Attack boosts from Work Up to one of your sweepers
- Foul Play – Allows Umbreon to attack the opponent using their own Attack stat to ensure that Umbreon can do some damage

Lead/Entry hazard setter/Entry hazard remover/Pivot
Landorus-Therian (M) @ Leftovers
Ability: Intimidate – Lowers the opponent's attack stat upon switch in
EVs: 252 HP / 164 Def / 92 Spe – Ensures that he can tank hits so that it can set up Stealth Rock, and also be slow enough to use his pivot move last, allowing you to switch your Pokémon in safely
- Earthquake – Strong Ground-type STAB attack
- Stealth Rock – Great for chip damage upon your opponent switching in
- U-turn – Helps you do damage and switch your Pokémon
- Defog – Removes all entry hazards and screens on the field

However, for your Electrode, it should look something like this:

Dual screens/Pivot
Electrode @ Light Clay – Increases the duration of your screens to 8 turns
Ability: Static – Has a good chance of paralysis the opponent if it makes contact
EVs: 252 HP / 4 SpD / 252 Spe – Ensures that Electrode remains bulky enough to stay alive, get off its screens, and hit and run with Volt Switch
Timid Nature
IVs: 0 Atk
- Volt Switch – The move that you would be using to hit and run
- Foul Play – Coverage Dark-type move that uses the opponent's Attack stat instead of its own. You could also use Thunderbolt too to do more STAB damage
- Light Screen – Halve the damage of special attacks for 5 turns
- Reflect – Halve the damage of physical attacks for 5 turns


If you're not too sure about how EVs and IVs work, or how to EV train your Pokémon, again, I could write up a guide for you if you need me to. All you have to do is let me know. Additionally, if you are interested in doing Doubles as well, again, let me know. I could write up a guide to help you with Doubles teambuilding too and Pokémon roles for Doubles. The style is different to Singles, as it mostly focuses on Pokémon abilities, moves, and how they work together with certain Pokémon rather than strict type matchups and cores like Singles. Writing that guide would also be shorter too because it's not that complicated, but still, just let me know. Also, keep in mind that I am well-aware that you might not have the same Pokémon that I chose to build this team in your game. However, you can still use the example team I built on Pokémon Showdown in Singles for Anything Goes (AG). You can also use it in Ubers as long as you remove Baton Pass from Umbreon and replace it with something like Yawn. However, the best way to develop your own teambuilding skills is simply to choose your own Pokémon, but follow my model to help you understand how to build your own team.

By the way, if you ever want to battle online on the Nintendo Switch, just let me know. If you're on Discord, you can hit me up there. My Discord name is Sweet Serenity #8131. My teams on Pokémon Brilliant Diamond are not that developed mind you, as I play on Pokémon Sword, but I can definitely get them situated for competitive so that we can battle if you want to. I can help you build some more teams too based on the other types of teams that I mentioned and give you more in-depth help. All you have to do is hit me up on here or Discord. I also I calculated and sorted the percentages that every possible type-combination can hit Pokémon super effectively with STAB and posted it as a blog here, which can view by clicking here. Maybe it can help you when considering what to use when building your team.

I hope this helped you a little bit, by the way.
Seen 2 Weeks Ago
Posted 2 Weeks Ago
7 posts
22 Days
Wow, I can hardly ask for a guide more complete than this. That surely gives me some food for thought to get started building a good team. I did knew about IV/EVs and wanted to go for Singles anyway so this covers just about any question I could've had.

And yes I would surely like to try the result against you sometime! (The moment I'm done breeding/training all of them, yes)

Thank you so much!

Sweet Serenity

Castelia City
Seen 1 Hour Ago
Posted 10 Hours Ago
509 posts
280 Days
Wow, I can hardly ask for a guide more complete than this. That surely gives me some food for thought to get started building a good team. I did knew about IV/EVs and wanted to go for Singles anyway so this covers just about any question I could've had.

And yes I would surely like to try the result against you sometime! (The moment I'm done breeding/training all of them, yes)

Thank you so much!
No problem! 😊 By the way, I wanted to say something in my post that was important. I thought I said it already, but I guess I misplaced it when I was editing my post. Notice how I said, in "Hazard setters," that I previously mentioned that Electrode was a good dual screen setter? Well, I actually didn't mention that at all before saying that because I lost the text that I was supposed to have put there when I was editing the guide. I must have cut it, pasted it somewhere else, and forgot to re-add it because I found it in another part of the document I was typing it in. lol

This is what I wanted to say:

Keep in mind that Smogon tier rankings do not always determine whether or not a Pokémon is good. For the most part, the tier lists on Smogon determine how well a Pokémon does on their battling platform, Pokémon Showdown, under their rules. Pokémon Showdown typically bans Pokémon that they believe are too powerful, certain moves and strategies, and often have many rules such as the "no sleep mod," which prevents more than one Pokémon from being asleep at a time, no Dynamaxing, and so on. Players must understand that Pokémon Showdown isn't the only place to play Pokémon competitively either. A good example of how the tier rankings aren't perfect involves the Pokémon Seismitoad. On Smogon, it is ranked RU, which means it's considered not that great. However, keep in mind that, on Pokémon Showdown outside of Anything Goes (AG), you're not allowed to Dynamax. If you played Singles on Pokémon Sword and Shield however, where moves, abilities, and strategies are not banned, you would notice Seismitoad being used a lot more often and completely dominating the meta game. This is because Seismitoad has the ability "Swift Swim," which doubles its Speed in the Rain from 74 to 148. When it Dynamaxes, it can set its own Rain with Max Geyser.

This, combined with the fact that Seismitoad can learn very strong coverage moves such as Grass-type Power Whip, Fighting-type Brick Break, which can break screens, and has a great STAB move in Earthquake, Seismitoad is a very dangerous sweeper and is also a great Zacian counter, which is arguably the most broken Pokémon of all time. Thus, despite Seismitoad being ranked as RU on Smogon, it is easily an Uber on Pokémon Sword and Shield. Thus, I wouldn't let the tier rankings of Pokémon on Smogon discourage you from using your favorites. As long as you use Pokémon for specific roles that they excel the best at, Electrode can definitely be a good Pokémon. Electrode used to be the fastest Pokémon in the game in the past and is still extremely fast despite the Speed stat power creep over the years. Electrode is great for setting up dual screens, which refer to Light Screen and Reflect because of its high Speed, and switching out with Volt Switch. This could be useful for both Singles and Doubles as well. To get a good understanding of how to build a competitive team, understand whether or not you want to play Doubles or Singles, as they both require a different approach to play. When you're playing Singles, the most important thing to consider is type matchups and Pokémon roles during battle. When you're playing Doubles, the most important thing is to consider Pokémon abilities, certain moves, and how they work with certain Pokémon.

I'll add it to the guide anyway as it was meant to be added there. I just wanted to post it here to show it you so you could know that I found it and get the alert for it.

Midnight Umbreon

Life is a conundrum of esoterica

Age 17
We/Them
Texas
Seen 1 Day Ago
Posted 1 Day Ago
950 posts
4.3 Years
To add to what Serenity said about smogon tiers, Pachirisu is a PU (Perfectly Useless) but I think we all saw what happened in 2014 XD

Like, I use an umbreon (pretty sure you don't see those too often but it's been a minute since I played online since I don't have a switch) that has toxic wish curse and protect. It's funny, and a pain, from what I understand XD
Seen 2 Weeks Ago
Posted 2 Weeks Ago
7 posts
22 Days
So I gave a dumb try at it and I think it's okay? First thoughts on it would be really nice!

Spoiler:

Espeon @ Light Clay
Ability: Magic Bounce
EVs: 4 HP / 252 SpA / 252 Spe
Timid Nature
IVs: 0 Atk
- Psychic
- Substitute
- Reflect
- Light Screen

Infernape @ Life Orb
Ability: Iron Fist
EVs: 4 HP / 252 Atk / 252 Spe
Adamant Nature
- Fire Punch
- Power-Up Punch
- Thunder Punch
- Mach Punch

Starmie @ Leftovers
Ability: Natural Cure
EVs: 128 Def / 252 SpA / 128 SpD
Modest Nature
- Scald
- Ice Beam
- Rapid Spin
- Recover

Gliscor @ Toxic Orb
Ability: Poison Heal
EVs: 128 Atk / 252 Def / 128 Spe
Adamant Nature
- Cross Poison
- Earthquake
- Stealth Rock
- Swords Dance

Drapion @ Life Orb
Ability: Keen Eye
EVs: 128 Atk / 128 SpD / 252 Spe
Careful Nature
- Agility
- Knock Off
- Iron Tail
- Toxic Spikes

Magnezone @ Quick Claw
Ability: Magnet Pull
EVs: 4 Def / 252 SpA / 252 SpD
Calm Nature
IVs: 0 Atk
- Thunderbolt
- Flash Cannon
- Volt Switch
- Thunder Wave