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Alinthea
June 18th, 2009, 04:26 AM
China to restrict Internet views pages

I am sick of all of these empty, discussion-less new articles flying around, so I found something that can give us a bit of discussion and opinions.

"From July, every PC sold in China was supposed to be supplied with the Green Dam Youth Escort software.
The software was created to stop people looking at "offensive" content such as pornographic or violent websites."
Article: China's Internet Block (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/8106526.stm)

What do you think about this?
Personally, I think that it is taking away peoples ability to look at what they want.
It is, in a way, restricting peoples ability to do as they like.

The Chinese government have always been big on "Protecting the country" from the harsh things on the Internet, but is it right?

Yes we can't do anything about it, but here can be the discussion on how you feel about it.

Edit:
Bahahaha, wrong forum ><'

Morkula
June 18th, 2009, 04:28 AM
This would be better suited for Comp/Tech~
*Moved*

Benadryl
June 18th, 2009, 05:42 AM
Pornography is a bit iffy, but there's really no reason at all for anyone to be looking at violent websites.

But they're not limiting the freedom of anyone. It is the choice of the computer owner whether they want to install it or not, and there is no legal punishment for not doing so.

twocows
June 18th, 2009, 08:20 AM
Censoring sites with pornographic content is stupid and encourages hostile alternatives such as rape or sexual assault.

"Violent" can be expanded to include something like the Tiananmen Square incident, and don't think China won't do it (they've been blocking anything about that for years). Alternatively, they could block sites about violent games, such as the recently-released Prototype.

This isn't that big of a deal now that it's not mandatory software, though (it was previously). People can just elect not to use it.

Alinthea
June 18th, 2009, 08:32 AM
I know it isn't that much of a big deal, but I wanted to spark some form of decent discussion instead of:

"OMG LOOK WHO DIED [insert stupid way]"

Has anyone had a website blocked in school or college or University?
I don't know about you but I always tried to get around it.
If a barrier is there, I find a way around it.
If it wasn't there, I would leave it.

twocows
June 18th, 2009, 08:45 AM
I know it isn't that much of a big deal, but I wanted to spark some form of decent discussion instead of:

"OMG LOOK WHO DIED [insert stupid way]"

Has anyone had a website blocked in school or college or University?
I don't know about you but I always tried to get around it.
If a barrier is there, I find a way around it.
If it wasn't there, I would leave it.

If they tried to block something at our university, I'd point it out to one of the more excitable people I know, and a bunch of noisy kids would be protesting it within a week. Me not included, because I'd just be using Tor (http://www.torproject.org/) to get around it.

Rukario
June 18th, 2009, 11:10 AM
and in related news, this just in:
China Says Its Okay For Users To Delete Its New Censorware
from the wasn't-expecting-that dept

Well, this is certainly something of a surprise. Earlier this month, China required new censorware be installed on all computers sold there. Of course, this upset a bunch of people and also raised serious security concerns. Still, we didn't expect the Chinese gov't to back down. However, a variety of lawsuits and public protests in China has resulted in at least some backing down by the government. The gov't is now saying that while the software will come installed on all new PCs, there's no requirement that it be used. Of course, it's not at all clear how easy it is to disable the software. The software is apparently uninstallable (or so the makers claim), but this new statement from the government makes it clear that there shouldn't be sanctions against those who do go through with the uninstall.
via Techdirt (http://www.techdirt.com/articles/20090617/0249305262.shtml)

twocows
June 18th, 2009, 11:13 AM
Not as surprising as you'd think, considering the myriad of problems that have already arisen with the software (security risks, stolen code, and uncooperative manufacturers for starters).

Alinthea
June 19th, 2009, 05:03 AM
It is rather interesting.
It isn't like a government to just say "Ok, you can pretty much ignore that."

It is good though, if England implemented something like that, I would be up in arms and I would most likely get rid of it anyway.

.inLOVE
June 19th, 2009, 08:07 AM
In a way, it's kind of messed up, because people should be allowed to view whatever they want. However, kids should not be looking at those types of websites anyways.

Alinthea
June 19th, 2009, 08:33 AM
However, kids should not be looking at those types of websites anyways.
I agree, but they will look at them anyway.
I think instead of a government ban, maybe it should be more on the parents to set a restriction if they feel they want to.

Again, it might not be much different from the government, but then it comes down to personal choice, instead of something been forced on them.

Though, it isn't forced anymore >.>

.Seth
June 21st, 2009, 02:00 AM
I expected China to do this, but to let people disable it? I was shocked.
Quick, eliminate all Chinese rulers, they must be robots.

Jokes aside, this is a bit unnecessary, as editing a HOSTS file within the computer, and locking and hiding it, and putting it where it can't be found is much simpler. But you'd have to list all the blocked sites, which is a lot.

Anyways, this seems like a good idea, only because of the "you don't have to" part.

twocows
June 21st, 2009, 02:49 PM
This would be better suited for Comp/Tech~
*Moved*
Seems more like a discussion about politics to me, unless s/he's asking what we think about the software in particular (I think it's unnecessary bloat that's full of security holes).

In a way, it's kind of messed up, because people should be allowed to view whatever they want.
I hope you don't live in the United States; it is illegal to own or view any material which violates US law here.


However, kids should not be looking at those types of websites anyways.Parents should decide this, not governments (provided the parents are fit to act as such). I guarantee parents know more about whether their child is mature enough to view something than the government.