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[Life] 🌳 Paradise: The Nature Club

How would you like the Nature Club to operate?

  • Include all natural life in one club (so incorporate wild animals into this thread)

    Votes: 4 57.1%
  • Keep this club for plants/insects and make a separate club for all other wild animals

    Votes: 2 28.6%
  • Separate animals and plants entirely into different clubs (with entomology transferred to a "wildlif

    Votes: 1 14.3%

  • Total voters
    7
  • Poll closed .
  • 9,726
    Posts
    8
    Years
    Anybody planning on sporting their sunglasses and observing the solar eclipse this Monday? Maybe a diy project of making a pinhole viewing box will be on your to-do list, or grabbing a filter/solar lens and photographing the big happening?

    North America is going to be in the path of totality, and I am told that from my part of the world we won't be able to see the shadow of the moon like this again for 20 years! While I am not in a place where I can see a total eclipse like some parts of America, Canada and Mexico will, and can't experience daytime darkness, what I can see from where I stand at 85% coverage still sounds like it will be beautiful with comparison to deep twilight and the sun resembling a crescent moon. The weather is expected to be clear and sunny, so I will go out in nature and appreciate what's happening.
     

    icycatelf

    Alex
  • 3,570
    Posts
    19
    Years
    We only got a partial eclipse here and it was really too cloudy to tell much of a difference. Looked out the window once and noticed a crescent-shaped reflection on the glass but that's about it.

    I did spot another White-Lined Black Moth while enjoying the shade though. Figured I'd take the opportunity to get a shot of it out in nature.
     

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    icycatelf

    Alex
  • 3,570
    Posts
    19
    Years
    Since I'm gonna be moving back soon, I'd thought I'd share a list of all the Lepidoptera my older brother has assembled the whole time we were here.
    Here are his observations.
    WOW @ the Imperial Fruit Sucking Moth, Horsfield's Tussock Moth, Frothers, Urapteroides astheniata, and Many-Plumed Moth! Love the Paracrama latimargo too (green moths ftw). So many cool moths!
     
  • 9,726
    Posts
    8
    Years
    I did get to see the eclipse. I was blessed to have mostly clear skies, and what I saw in the sky looked like a last quarter half moon at times and a waning crescent moon at others. It was super bright at first, but then it looked like early evening, though it was still afternoon, it was gray and the sun was really rosy and candlelight-colored, or at least that is how it appeared through the eclipse glasses. I am glad that I got to see it, It was breathtaking and I hope that others get to also enjoy what I was fortunate enough to be part of. I looked to see when and where some of the net total eclipses will be visible, and read that in 2028 Australia will one of the continents that get the honor!

     

    icycatelf

    Alex
  • 3,570
    Posts
    19
    Years
    Still nothing new, but here are some more nice repeat visitors from the past week or so: an American Lappet Moth, Dogwood Thyatirid, Blackberry Looper and, my first sphingid of the year, Walnut Sphinx. Might need to start saving my juiciticity for new ones though. My rechargeable batteries are DYING... Dx

    I also spotted some morels growing by the creek (might be a new species for me but I'm not 100%) and discovered a wild Hoppip.
     

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    Lavender

    No, your gonna face ME first!
  • 9,577
    Posts
    1
    Years
    Still nothing new, but here are some more nice repeat visitors from the past week or so: an American Lappet Moth, Dogwood Thyatirid, Blackberry Looper and, my first sphingid of the year, Walnut Sphinx. Might need to start saving my juiciticity for new ones though. My rechargeable batteries are DYING... Dx

    I also spotted some morels growing by the creek (might be a new species for me but I'm not 100%) and discovered a wild Hoppip.
    I have seen caterpillars of the american lappet moth! there pretty cool caterpillars that show red stripes when threatened!
     

    icycatelf

    Alex
  • 3,570
    Posts
    19
    Years
    I've yet to spot the caterpillar. Don't recall reading about the warning color previously. Neat!

    Bellsprout bellworts are up again (no pics). Spotted another adult male five-lined skink with that big red noggin as well as my first bagworm of the year! This species usually retreats into its bag when handled and won't come out until after it's put down but this one seemed particularly curious.

    redskink.jpg bag24_sml.jpg

    Also found my first new thing of the year: a side-swimmer (scud), I think? Amphipod in any case. Bad pics bc smol and wet.

    crust.png
     
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  • 9,726
    Posts
    8
    Years
    The top photo looks like a wild Salandit trying to hide!

    Adding some wildlife video for your weekend enjoyment. Just look at how these mountain goats scale those cliffs. I thought the video was edited at first! Awesome! Next time pokemon makes a goat-inspired monster it should be a dual flying type.

     

    icycatelf

    Alex
  • 3,570
    Posts
    19
    Years
    Makes me wonder if Skymin might pull inspiration from goats. In the movie, didn't Gracidea grow on top of a mountain?

    Missed the peak of the aurora night before last but was able to catch some pink behind the clouds a bit after midnight last night (pardon the dust and graininess).

    cloudy_aurora.jpg

    There seemed to be a little more action (in terms of dancing and pulsating) around 4am but I can't say for sure that it wasn't my eyes playing tricks on me from staying up all night. Batteries died while trying to sort out my camera settings, though it was probably too faint to capture with my camera's capabilities anyway.
     
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    icycatelf

    Alex
  • 3,570
    Posts
    19
    Years
    The Hebrew is actually named after the moth's black markings, some of which resemble Hebrew characters. And the preferred name of the Retarded Dagger is Maple Dagger now.

    One of the most amusing moth names to me (that I've personally encountered, at least) is the Yellow-Vested Moth, fitting as it is. They could've called it the Yellow-Based Moth or Yellow-Based Rectiostoma after its scientific name, but nope, someone had to go and make it the most adorable little construction worker. xD

    - - -

    Not sure how often I'll be getting out over the next bit. I've been getting eaten up by ticks even with repellent. Dx

    Here are some finds since my last post though: a Major Sallow, Pipevine Swallowtail caterpillar (including the reddish early instar, which I've seen compared to Wurmple), Lemon Plagodis (poorly marked but still pleasantly lemony), Pecan Leaf Casebearer, leaf-rolling weevil nidus (aka Sewaddle/Swadloon), very early instar Heterocampa caterpillar (possibly Wavy-Lined), Banded Olethreutes, Black and Red Sumac Leaf Beetle, and American Carrion Beetle.
     

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    Lavender

    No, your gonna face ME first!
  • 9,577
    Posts
    1
    Years
    The Hebrew is actually named after the moth's black markings, some of which resemble Hebrew characters. And the preferred name of the Retarded Dagger is Maple Dagger now.

    One of the most amusing moth names to me (that I've personally encountered, at least) is the Yellow-Vested Moth, fitting as it is. They could've called it the Yellow-Based Moth or Yellow-Based Rectiostoma after its scientific name, but nope, someone had to go and make it the most adorable little construction worker. xD

    - - -

    Not sure how often I'll be getting out over the next bit. I've been getting eaten up by ticks even with repellent. Dx

    Here are some finds since my last post though: a Major Sallow, Pipevine Swallowtail caterpillar (including the reddish early instar, which I've seen compared to Wurmple), Lemon Plagodis (poorly marked but still pleasantly lemony), Pecan Leaf Casebearer, leaf-rolling weevil nidus (aka Sewaddle/Swadloon), very early instar Heterocampa caterpillar (possibly Wavy-Lined), Banded Olethreutes, Black and Red Sumac Leaf Beetle, and American Carrion Beetle.
    The pipevine caterpillars are precious🥺
     
  • 9,726
    Posts
    8
    Years
    I was wondering if anyone is familiar with the research of Professor Gingko? He has been making some nice wildlife documentaries about the species of our planet in their natural habitats. Ready to venture with him into caves, marshes and swamps to find what dwells there?

     
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